Working Party
Working Party on General Safety
110th session | Geneva | 25-29 Apr 2016 Download Copy
Agenda Item 22. | New regulation on Advanced Driver Assist Systems (ADAS)
Documentation
GRSG-109-19 | Information on requirements for driver assistance systems for heavy goods vehicles addressing blind spot accidents (Germany)
GRSG-110-18/Rev.1 | Draft Regulation on driver assist systems to avoid blind spot accidents (Germany and BASt)
GRSG-110-19 | VRU collision avoidance and blind-spot detection (Israel and Mobileye)

60. The expert from Israel gave a presentation (GRSG-110-19) on the need and global support to develop new technical provisions for blind spot detection and warning systems as well as the installation of such collision avoidance systems on heavy duty vehicles. Referring to GRSG-109-19 presented at the previous session, the expert from Germany introduced GRSG-110-18-Rev.1 on the current status of development on test procedures for a new draft regulation on Advanced Driver Assist Systems (ADAS) to avoid such blind spot accidents through a driver information and warning system. He reported on the results of several test scenarios of a heavy goods vehicle with a proposed test dummy. He concluded that further investigations were still in progress. GRSG welcomed the presentations and noted a number of comments.

61. Following the discussion, GRSG decided to go forward in a two-step approach: (i) to develop new requirements for driver warning systems and (ii) to investigate subsequently the possibility to develop further requirements for automatic braking systems. GRSG agreed to resume consideration of this subject at its next session on the basis of first draft of the new UN Regulation on ADAS expected to be submitted by Germany.

Previous Discussion(s)

World Forum for the Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations | Session 167 | 10-13 Nov 2015

[Postponed until June 2016 session in order to integrate the contents with additional provisions under development within the GRSG.]

69. Agenda item 4.13.1, new Regulation on frontal impact, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/105, insert the following amendment to read:
Paragraph 5.2.8.2, amend the term “0.5 litres” to read “5.0 litres”.

[Postponed until June 2016 session in order to integrate the contents with additional provisions under development within the GRSG.]

Deleted from the agenda.

1. The World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29) held its 167th session from 10 to 13 November 2015, chaired by Mr. B. Kisulenko (Russian Federation). The following countries were represented, following Rule 1(a) of the Rules of Procedure of WP.29 (TRANS/WP.29/690 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/690/Amend.1 and Amend.2): Australia; Belgium; Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina; Canada; China; Czech Republic; Finland; France; Germany; Hungary; India; Italy; Japan; Kazakhstan, Latvia, Luxembourg; Netherlands; Norway; Pakistan; Poland; Portugal; Republic of Korea; Romania; Russian Federation; Serbia; South Africa; Spain; Sweden; Switzerland; Turkey; United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; United States of America; Representatives of the European Union (EU) participated. The following governmental organization was represented: International Telecommunication Union (ITU). The following non-governmental organizations were also represented: Association for Emission Control by Catalyst (AECC); Consumers International (CI); European Tyre and Rim Technical Organization (ETRTO); European Association of Automotive Suppliers (CLEPA/MEMA/JAPIA);1 the Foundation for the Automobile and Society (FIA Foundation);; International Automotive Lighting and Light Signalling Expert Group (GTB); International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC); International Motorcycle Manufacturers Association (IMMA); and International Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers (OICA).

2. The Chair of the World Forum welcomed Pakistan, which participated in WP.29 for the first time. The representative of Pakistan addressed the World Forum and highlighted investment opportunities in the automobile sector of Pakistan in view of economic growth, construction of motorways, other infrastructure projects including the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor and the establishment of numerous industrial estates in near future. He expressed his gratitude to the Government of Japan, Japanese Ministries, research organizations including JASIC and automobile producers for supporting Pakistan’s attendance at WP.29. He added that although Pakistan was an observer at this meeting, he hoped that later Pakistan could become a Contracting Party.

3. The secretariat gave an overview of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which had been adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in September 2015. Of the seventeen SDGs, five will directly and one indirectly involve transport and will be related to the work of the World Forum.

4. The secretariat also reminded the World Forum of the meeting of the Inland Transport Committee in February 2016 with special attention to its policy segment focusing on “Innovations for Sustainable Inland Transport with Special Attention to Information and Communication Technologies” and invited those interested to participate.

5. The provisional annotated agenda for the session (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1117) was adopted with the amendments below:
Addition of agenda items:
2.4 Decade of Action for Road Safety (2011-2020);
4.2.3 Transposition of WLTP into UN Regulations;
18.3b UN GTR No. 6 (Safety glazing).

6. The list of informal documents is reproduced in Annex I to this report.

7. The 119th session of WP.29/AC.2 was held on 9 November 2015, chaired by Mr. B. Kisulenko (Russian Federation) and was attended, in accordance to Rule 29 of the terms of reference and rules of procedure of WP.29 (TRANS/WP.29/690 including its Amends.1 and 2), by the Chairs of WP.29 (Russian Federation), GRB (France), GRE (Belgium), GRSP (United States of America), GRPE (Germany), GRRF (United Kingdom), GRSG (Italy), the Administrative/Executive Committees of the three agreements administered by WP.29 (Russian Federation (AC.1), Russian Federation (AC.4) and the United Kingdom (AC.3)), by the representatives of the European Union, Japan and the United States of America and by the Vice-Chairs of WP.29 (Italy), GRSG (Hungary), GRPE (India) and GRSP (Republic of Korea). Canada, as recently new elected Vice-Chair of GRSG, participated on invitation by the secretariat.

8. The Committee reviewed the draft agenda of the 167th session of the World Forum and recommended the amendments as indicated in paragraph 5 above. The Committee recommended that the Administrative Committee of the 1997 Agreement (AC.4) not convene. WP.29/AC.2 also reviewed the draft agenda for the 168th session of the World Forum, scheduled to be held in Geneva from 8 to 11 March 2016.

9. The representative of Japan reported on the progress of the Informal Working Group on International Whole Vehicle Type Approval (IWVTA-IG). He reported that IWVTA-IG would request WP.29 to extend the mandate of the group by 15 months, until June 2017. The representative of the United Kingdom reminded AC.2 that the extension of the mandate would affect the work of GRs, especially when preparing documents with transitional provisions that need to be aligned with the introduction of Regulation No. 0.

10. Following presentations from the secretariat, the Committee decided to continue discussions on the coordination work on ITS and revisions/recasts of UN regulations at the next AC.2 session in March 2016. The Committee noted concerns raised about the proposal tabled on market fuel quality.

11. The secretariat reminded GRs to inform the secretariat about any new abbreviations brought into use in their documents.

12. The secretariat informed GRs about the deadline of 7 December 2015 for the submission of documents for the 168th WP.29 (8-11 March 2016).

13. The Committee elected Mr. Boris Kisulenko (Russian Federation) as Chair of the AC.2 for the sessions of the year 2016.

14. The World Forum approved the draft programme of work and biennial evaluation (2016-2017) (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/112) and asked the secretariat to submit them to the next meeting of the Inland Transport Committee in February 2016. The secretariat presented the confirmed calendar of sessions for the year 2016 (based on WP.29-167-01). The World Forum agreed with the calendar as reproduced in Annex II to this report. The World Forum noted WP.29‑167‑03 on the chairmanships of WP.29.

15. The representative of the United Kingdom, and Chair of the IWG on ITS/AD, summed up the outcome of the IWG session that took place from 2.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m. on 11 November 2015 and reported that the work of the informal group had progressed well. He informed the World Forum about the items discussed at the meeting of the November 2015, including the relationship with WP.1 and how the 1968 Vienna Convention could be amended to ensure that automated driving systems were brought safely to the market. He added that the IWG would also discuss software and software security with special attention to ‘over-the-air’ software-updates.

16. The secretariat gave a status report to the World Forum on UNECE activities in the area of automated vehicles (WP.29-167-04). He informed WP.29 that (i) GRRF had discussed Automated Commanded Steering Functions (ACSF), Remote Control Parking systems (RCP) and cyber security issues, (ii) GRSG had focused on Event Data Recorders (EDR), (iii) that the amendment to Articles 8 and 39 of the 1968 Vienna Convention of Road Traffic would enter into force on 23 March 2016 and (iv) that WP.1 had established an informal group to deal with automated vehicles and the cooperation with WP.29.

17. The representative of ITU made an announcement on the “Future of the Networked Car Symposium” that is going to be co-organised with UNECE on Thursday, 3 March 2016 at the Geneva Auto Motor Show. The Symposium will focus on the area of software security and cyber-security.

18. The secretariat presented the midterm results of the World Forum on the development of UN Regulations and UN GTRs (WP.29-167-06) to make vehicle safer, in the framework of the Decade of Action for Road Safety. WP.29 adopted WP.29-167-06 and requested the secretariat to reproduce it as Annex III to this report and to transmit it to the Inland Transport Committee.

19. The World Forum recalled the oral report of the Chair of GRE given during the 166th session (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1116, paras. 23-25) and approved the report.

20. The World Forum recalled the oral report of the Chair of GRSG given during the 166th session (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1116, paras. 26-28) and approved the report.

21. The World Forum recalled the oral report of the Chair of GRSP given during the 166th session (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1116, paras. 29-34) and approved the report.

22. The World Forum recalled the oral report of the Chair of GRPE given during the 166th session (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1116, paras. 35-40) and approved the report.

23. The GRB Chair reported on the results achieved by GRB during its sixty-second session (for details, see the report of the session ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRB/60), in particular, the adoption of a draft Regulation on Quiet Road Transport Vehicles (QRTV) under the 1958 Agreement.

24. He further informed the World Forum that GRB agreed to continue its work on QRTV with a view to address concerns raised by the World Blind Union (WBU) and to finalize a UN GTR on QRTV. To this end, GRB requested the extension of the mandates of both IWG for a QRTV Regulation and IWG on QRTV for a UN GTR until December 2016. WP.29 gave its consent for both mandate extensions, subject to confirmation by AC.3 for the mandate extension of the IWG on QRTV for a UN GTR.

25. WP.29 noted that GRB had re-elected Mr. S. Ficheux (France) as Chair and Mr. A. Bocharov (Russian Federation) as Vice-Chair for the year 2016.

26. The Chair of GRRF, Mr. B. Frost (United Kingdom), informed the World Forum about the results achieved by GRRF during its eightieth sessions (for more details see the report of the session ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRRF/80).

27. The GRRF chair informed WP.29 about the submission by GRRF of the revised Terms of Reference and Rules of Procedures of the informal group on Automatically Commanded Steering Functions (ACSF) as reproduced in the annex of the session’s report.

28. The representative of OICA wondered why the IWG on ACSF was prioritizing its work on the complex Category E ACSF systems instead of starting with the more basic categories, and using the experience so gained to develop the requirements for the higher categories. The Chair of GRRF answered that the IWG had chosen a top down approach, starting with the provisions for the Category E to make sure that the relevant requirements cascade down through the other ACSF Categories. The representative of Germany added that no delay was expected because of the approach chosen and that with this approach, all ACSF categories would be addressed.

29. WP.29 noted that GRRF had re-elected Mr. B Frost (United Kingdom) as Chair and Mr. A. Murai (Japan) as Vice-Chair for the year 2016.

30. The GRSG Chair informed WP.29 about the results achieved during the 109th session of GRSG (for more details see the report of the session ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRSG/88 and Add.1).

31. The GRSG chair recalled that GRSG had already adopted at its previous session in May 2015 a new 02 series of amendments proposing provisions on a directional discharge of the pressure relief devices of CNG containers (submitted as ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/90 to the November 2015 session of WP.29). He added that GRSG had just adopted another amendment removing the provisions on welded cylinders and raising again the stringency of Regulation No. 110. Instead of adopting that amendment as a further new series of amendments, GRSG had agreed to remove ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/90 from the WP.29 agenda in November 2015 and to submit a new draft 02 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 110, incorporating both proposals (directional discharge and removal of welded cylinders) for consideration at the March 2016 session of WP.29.

32. The GRSG chair added that GRSG had considered the results of a study carried out by Germany on blind spot accidents of heavy goods vehicles and that GRSG had agreed on the need to develop a new regulation on the installation on heavy goods vehicles of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) to avoid such blind spot accidents.

33. The GRSG chair reported that GRSG had adopted a minor amendment to the Terms of Reference of the IWG on Panoramic Sunroof Glazing (PSG) to clarify the current scope of UN GTR No. 6.

34. As the mandate of the IWG on AECS was limited to October 2015 and due to the delay in the development of the new Regulation, the GRSG Chair sought the endorsement of WP.29 on the extension of the mandate of IWG by one year. WP.29 gave its consent to extend the mandate. The representative of the Russian Federation, chairing the informal group, reported on the progress made by the IWG. He pointed out that the IWG was working on new items. He did not exclude that other issues would arise. Such questions should be discussed at the stage of the work of IWG to avoid their consideration in the later stages in GRSG or WP.29. The representative of OICA underlined the urgent need to finalize the draft Regulation and to conclude consideration of the remaining open issues, without continuously adding new ones.

35. WP.29 noted that GRSG had re-elected Mr. A. Erario (Italy) as Chair and Mr. K. Hendershot (Canada) as Vice-Chair for the year 2016.

36. GRSG learned that Mr. Matyas Matolcsy (Hungary) was retiring at the end of this year and thanked him for his considerable contributions to the activities of GRSG over the last four decades and his dedication since 2001 as Vice-Chair of GRSG.

37. The Chairman of GRE reported on the results of the seventy-fourth session of GRE (for details, see the report of the session ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/74).

38. The GRE chair informed WP.29 about the ongoing activities of GRE on simplifying lighting and light-signalling Regulations, bearing in mind the guidance provided by WP.29 and the United Nations Office for Legal Affairs (OLA). The representative of IEC presented WP.29-167-19 recalling the approach proposed for the simplification of light sources regulations and the guidance provided by OLA. He invited WP.29 to reconfirm its earlier mandate (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1112, para. 42) to prepare a repository (resolution) on light sources and asked whether this repository could be in English only. The World Forum reconfirmed the approach for simplification of light source regulations but insisted on the need for the repository to be available in the three official languages English, French and Russian.

39. The Chair of GRE reported that at the last GRE session, Japan reported on its study of daytime running lamps (DRL) which did not identify negative effects of DRL on road traffic and informed the World Forum that these activities had started with the aim to include Regulation No. 48 into IWVTA.

40. WP.29 noted that GRE had re-elected Mr. M. Loccufier (Belgium) as Chair and Mr. D. Rovers (Netherlands) as Vice-Chair for the year 2016.

41. The secretariat informed the World Forum about the latest update of the status of the 1958 Agreement (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/343/Rev.23) containing the information received by the secretariat until 23 October 2015.

42. The secretariat reported on the efforts of the GRs to provide transparency when considering reference to a private standard in a Regulation. He invited the representative of Germany, Chair of the IWG on the of the three-dimensional “H” point machine (3-D H machine) to report on the negotiations with SAE regarding the use of SAE standards in the development of the 3-D H machine in June 2015. The representative of Germany informed the World Forum that the SAE J826 standard had been reviewed based on the information provided by SAE to be used for the WP.29’s purpose to determine what information would be needed. A table listing the parts of the standard needed for the purpose of the work of the IWG had been drafted and would be sent by the secretariat to SAE for review. He announced that, thanks to this progress, the IWG would be likely in the position to draft an Addendum to the Mutual Resolution No. 1 reproducing the specifications of the 3-D H machine.

43. No new material was presented under this agenda item.

44. The representative of the EU presented WP.29-167-20 detailing the following two possible routes for transposing the UN GTR on WLTP into a UN Regulation:

(a) UN Regulation on WLTP would fully reflect EU legislation, whereas non-EU Contracting Parties would need to draft their own national legislation. In this case, the UN Regulation would be drafted so that individual parts of it could be easily referred to in national legislation;

(b) With the second proposed route, a UN Regulation on WLTP would be developed in a hierarchical manner with different levels of stringency. The top level would correspond to the most stringent combination of regional requirements, whereas the levels below would correspond to a specific national or regional legislation in terms of emission limits and region-specific technical and administrative requirements. Non-EU Contracting Parties, such as Japan, having so far different emission legislation could apply the UN Regulation on WLTP. In this case, each Contracting Party applying the UN Regulation on WLTP would only have to accept type approval according to the top level but could also accept those corresponding to its own national or regional level of stringency. The Contracting Parties could issue type approval according to all levels.

45. The representative of the EU highlighted the advantages and drawbacks of each possible route. He expressed the preference of EU for the second option, since it could foster global harmonization at the mid- and long-term and would probably allow the inclusion of the UN Regulation on WLTP into the International Whole Vehicle Type Approval (IWVTA). He sought the view and opinion of WP.29 on the two routes.

46. The representatives of Japan and Switzerland expressed their support for the second route, as it was the best one towards global harmonization despite of its complexity. The representative of OICA also agreed in principle, taking into account the apparent compatibility of route two with IWVTA.

47. WP.29 agreed to transpose the WLTP UN GTR into a UN Regulation according to the second route proposed by the representative of the EU.

48. The representative of Germany, Chair of GRPE, confirmed that GRPE would start work according to the second route at its January 2016 session.

49. The expert from OICA, however, informed WP.29 of the challenges related to route two, given the fact that experts had difficulties in determining worst-case scenarios due to the modular concept of WLTP. The EC representative replied that a hierarchy would only exist between the top level and the regional level alternatives. It was not the intention of route two to introduce hierarchy of testing or of test limits between the regional alternatives. The Chair of GRPE confirmed the complexity of the new UN Regulation following route two. Therefore, GRPE needs to start the work on the transposition of WLTP into a UN Regulation with consideration for the scope and structure.

50. The representative of OICA pointed out that, according to the IWVTA concept, only the highest level of stringency, covering all other levels, would be applicable for universal international whole vehicle type approvals once the new UN Regulation on WLTP is established and included in Annex 4 to UN Regulation No. 0. He, therefore, suggested that this matter needed very careful consideration in order to ensure that the highest level remained feasible in view of the IWVTA development.

51. The representative of Japan, on behalf of the co-Chair of the IWG on IWVTA, reported on the work progress made in the subgroup for the 1958 Agreement and the subgroup for Regulation No. 0 (WP.29-167-09). He reported that the subgroup for the 1958 Agreement still had to further review the general guideline document, and had considered some editorial issues and clarified the difference between revision and version. He also reported that the subgroup on Regulation 0 had agreed on almost all issues, except for the definition of vehicle type. He informed WP.29 that the subgroup had agreed to conduct a pre-testing of UN Regulation No. 0. He presented a document with questions and answers (WP.29-167-10), which aimed at promoting the understanding of UN Regulation No. 0 and IWVTA among existing and potential Contracting Parties to the 1958 Agreement. He sought the consent of WP.29 to extend the mandate of the IWG on IWVTA by fifteen months, until June 2017 (WP.29-167-11). The World Forum endorsed the extended terms of reference and rules of procedures, and agreed to extend the mandate.

52. The representative of OICA informed the World Form that the IWG had reviewed the proposal presented by the representative of the Russian Federation (WP.29-167-08) and considered that the issue raised had multiple implications. He added that the IWG, therefore, preferred to address the concerns of the Russian Federation in the above-mentioned question and answer document, in order to ensure that all possible scenarios are duly taken into account.

53. WP.29 recalled the work related to draft Revision 3 to the 1958 Agreement and the position of a number of Contracting Parties to increase the majority-voting threshold from two-thirds to four-fifths. The representative of EU gave an update on the progress of deliberation within the EU on the voting issue. She reported that the work at the EU level had progressed and that the draft proposal had entered in the decision-making process in the Council. She expected that a final position on this issue would be presented in March 2016.

54. The representative of the Russian Federation re-iterated his position in favour of the four-fifths voting threshold.

55. The World Forum agreed to seek, at its forthcoming session in March 2016, unanimity by the Contracting Parties to the 1958 Agreement on the final text of draft Revision 3. For that purpose, the secretariat was requested to prepare a final document, taking into account the editorial correction adopted by the IWG on IWVTA.

56. The representative of Germany reported on the progress of the DETA Informal Working Group on behalf of the Chair of the Group. He reported that the Group had convened on 4 November 2015 and discussed the different attributes and data formats for the database, taking into account Regulation No. 0 and IWVTA specifications of the Declaration of Conformance (DoC). He added that the discussion on rights and obligations of users had started. He reminded the World Forum that there was a testing version available, for which the Secretary of the Group would be available to provide login information. The next meeting of the Group would take place on 2 March 2016 in Paris.

57. The secretariat informed WP.29 that there were no specific relevant precedent cases for gaining extra regular budget and that the official budgetary procedures have to be followed. He added that, given the preference of WP.29 to opt for funding by the regular budget, the initiative should be taken by the Contracting Parties to request additional regular budget for the hosting and operation of DETA at UNECE.

58. The World Forum considered the draft amendments under agenda items 4.6.1 to 4.6.3 and recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting.

59. The World Forum considered the draft amendments under items 4.7.1 to 4.7.8 and 7.9.10 to 4.7.11 and recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting subject to the corrections of para. 60. below.

60. Agenda item 4.7.4, Regulation No. 58, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/85, insert the following amendment to read:
Paragraph 31.4., correct the wording “of to the Regulation” to read “of the Regulation”.

61. The consideration of ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/90 tabled under agenda item 4.7.9 was deferred to the March 2016 session of WP.29 (see para. 31 above).

62. The representative of OICA raised concerns on the amendments to Regulations Nos. 97 and 116 on vehicle alarm systems (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/87 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/91). He added that some further amendments to Regulation No. 48 were needed to fully clarify the purpose of these proposals. The representative of the EU saw no need to delay the vote and was in favour of going ahead with the adoption of both documents. The representative of Germany volunteered to prepare, together with the experts from OICA, a proposal for such amendments to Regulation No. 48 for consideration at the next GRE session.

62. The representative of OICA raised concerns on the amendments to Regulations Nos. 97 and 116 on vehicle alarm systems (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/87 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/91). He added that some further amendments to Regulation No. 48 were needed to fully clarify the purpose of these proposals. The representative of the EU saw no need to delay the vote and was in favour of going ahead with the adoption of both documents. The representative of Germany volunteered to prepare, together with the experts from OICA, a proposal for such amendments to Regulation No. 48 for consideration at the next GRE session.

63. The World Forum considered the draft amendments under items 4.8.1 to 4.8.8 and recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting.

64. The World Forum considered the draft amendments under items 4.9.1 to 4.9.4 and recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting.

65. The World Forum considered the draft amendment under item 4.10.1 and recommended its submission to AC.1 for voting.

66. No corrigenda were submitted under this agenda item.

67. No pending proposal remained under this agenda item.

68. The World Forum considered the draft amendments under items 4.13.1 and 4.13.2 and recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting, subject to the correction of para. 69. below.

70. No proposal for amendments was submitted under this agenda item.

71. WP.29 agreed that agenda items 5.1 to 5.5 should be considered by AC.3.

72. The representative of the Russian Federation presented WP.29-164-07 on the federal law on standardization. WP.29 noted that it would come into force in 2016.

73. The representative of India presented WP.29-164-25 on the National Automotive Testing and R&D Infrastructure Project (NATRIP) that is creating state of the art testing facilities both for vehicle and component certification as well as for vehicle inspection.

74. The secretariat recalled the consolidated document (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/ 1074/Rev.5) on the status of the Agreement including the status of the UN Rules annexed to the Agreement, the list of the Contracting Parties to the Agreement and of their Administrative Departments.

75. The representative of the Netherlands notified the World Forum that the IWG on Periodical Technical Inspection (PTI) had started its work. He noted that the second meeting of the Group would be held on 18 November 2015 and invited the participants of WP.29 to join the meeting.

76. The representative of the Russian Federation, Co-chair of the IWG, presented WP.29-167-13 on the development of Agreement Concerning the Adoption of Uniform Conditions for Periodical Technical Inspections of Wheeled Vehicles and the Reciprocal Recognition of such Inspections, done in Vienna on 13 November 1997. He formulated principles for development of the Agreement based on the provisions of the international standards on quality and risk management, that allow improvement of the efficiency and quality of periodical technical inspection, to harmonize requirements and make the agreement attractive to a larger number of countries. It was also noted that the IWG on PTI would consider the principles and requirements for conformity of PTI system, including requirements for its technical and administrative support.

77. The World Forum agreed to defer consideration of this item, awaiting the outcome of the work of IWG on PTI.

78. The World Forum agreed to defer consideration of this item, awaiting the outcome of the work of IWG on PTI.

79. The representative of the European Commission (EC) expressed the extreme concern on what media refer to as the Volkswagen (VW) case. She informed WP.29 about the course of action taken by the EC. She reported that the EC had offered to coordinate the flow of information regarding national investigations, and had requested EU Member States (MS) to provide information on measures they planned to undertake or had already undertaken. She added that based on input from MS, the Joint Research Centre (JRC) would develop a common testing method and that the JRC had offered its services to MS who would request it. She informed WP.29 that the EU had already engaged in legislative and regulatory work before the case was revealed, including work on Real Driving Emissions (RDE) and work to reinforce the type approval system (revision of the framework Directive 2007/46/EC).

80. The representative of the United States of America reported that the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (WP.29-167-31) had sent two Notices Of Violation (NOV) to VW alleging that vehicles sold in the United States included software that circumvent EPA regulations. He gave details on how the violation was committed, how much the emission level exceeds the limit values and the estimated number of vehicles concerned. He recalled the five key components of the compliance programme of EPA. He added that all manufacturers have been informed that, as a result of these alleged violations, EPA had increased their testing programme. He informed the World Forum about the outstanding collaboration with EPA of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and Environment Canada.

81. The representative of Canada added that they also had opened investigations on the issue and were closely collaborating with EPA.

82. The representative of Germany reported that an internal commission had been set up to investigate the VW situation in Germany and Europe. He added that a test procedure had been developed by the German type approval authority, Kraftfahrt-Bundesamt (KBA), to identify whether a vehicle contained prohibited defeat device systems, including Type 1 tests in laboratories, Type 1 tests replicated on a test track with portable emission measurement systems, variations in the test cycles as well as RDE tests. So far, of the more than 50 tests that had been planned, half have been finalized, and evaluation of the test results was ongoing. He informed WP.29 that KBA decided officially on an additional assignment to the type approval, which will force VW to recall the vehicles. A software update for the vehicles equipped with 1.2L and 2.0L diesel engine and hardware and software update for vehicles equipped with 1.6L diesel engines, which would start in beginning of 2016 would be performed by the manufacturer and be supervised by KBA in Germany. He also informed WP.29 that the recently revealed issue of CO2 emissions was still under investigation. He concluded that these events might have an impact on WP.29, especially since approvals according to UN Regulations Nos. 83 and 101 were concerned.

83. The representatives of the Russian Federation announced the current status of internal activities dealing with the VW situation in the Russian Federation. He noted the importance of international information exchange and also the cooperation of VW with the Russian administration on the situation.

84. The representative of the UK explained his Government’s approach to testing vehicle emissions in response to the VW issue. He said that they had started a test programme investigating a range of Euro 5 and Euro 6 specification vehicles representing top selling products in the UK market from a number of manufacturers. He mentioned that his experts were in close contact with the German authorities to discuss test procedures and to coordinate their programmes where possible. The UK welcomed the European Commission’s coordination activities and involvement of JRC. He stressed that the testing would be done without manufacturer involvement by the UK approval authority (the Vehicle Certification Agency) at independent laboratories and on-road testing, and this could delay results until early 2016. He would provide information to the Working Party as soon as results would be published. He concluded by confirming that VW had engaged constructively with their UK agency handling the recall.

85. The representative of France reported on the initiated test programme which, in total would cover 100 vehicles representative of vehicle fleet in France. These tests were aimed at determining whether the fraud is limited to a few models of the Volkswagen group or if it extends to all models and other manufacturers. France has committed to publishing the test results. The test protocol would be implemented in France by the Union Technique de l’Automobile du motocycle et du Cycle (UTAC) under the control of the French authorities. He concluded that France considers that the VW case was an opportunity to improve the procedure and address past suspicions.

86. The representative of Australia noted that the VW case had revealed a gap in the international regulatory regime and that as it is an international problem, it could only be addressed internationally through a UN Regulation or UN GTR. He sought continued discussion of the issue at WP.29. The representative of Japan expressed his support for this view.

87. The representative of Spain also reported on the intention of his country to test vehicles according to the test procedure defined by Germany.

88. The representative of Italy informed the World Forum that testing had already started in his country in close cooperation with Germany and the European Commission.

89. The representative of OICA recalled that his organization represented the global automobile industry through the various national (or even regional) auto industry associations. He added that in this capacity OICA cooperates with Contracting Parties to develop and clarify regulatory requirements and test procedures so that they are clear, representative, scientific and reproducible. He stated that OICA could not and was not meant to verify whether and how manufacturers comply with the legislative acts, since this is the responsibility of individual manufacturers. He added that the ongoing particular issue should not be used as a pretext to cast suspicion on the entire automotive sector or on a particular technology. He concluded that OICA fully supports the activities in the various countries to solve this important ongoing issue.

90. The World Forum decided to keep this item on its agenda and continue discussions in upcoming sessions.

91. The Secretary of the Working Party on Road Traffic Safety (WP.1) reported on the entry into force on 23 March 2016 of the amendments to Articles 8 and 39 of the 1968 Vienna Convention and that a similar amendment was proposed for the 1949 Geneva Convention on Road Traffic. He also reported on the progress during its recent session, held on 5-7 October 2015, on substantive issues on the amendment to align the provisions on lighting and light-signalling with those of the 1958 Agreement. He informed the World Forum about the document tabled by the experts from Belgium and Sweden exploring the role of the driver in a vehicle with high levels of automation. He added that WP.1 discussed whether the Convention allows testing of autonomous vehicles on public roads and that the expert from Belgium volunteered to prepare an amendment to the Convention to clarify this issue. He concluded his report, informing WP.29 of the recent establishment of an IWG dealing with automated vehicles.

92. WP.29 recalled its wish to avoid task overlap and duplication between groups. The Chair informed the Secretary of WP.1 that the IWG on ITS/AD had elected the representative of Finland to act as ambassador between ITS/AD and the informal group of experts of WP.1. WP.29 decided that the IWG on ITS/AD would be mandated by WP.29 to be the interface with the informal group of experts of WP.1.

93. The representative of CONCAWE presented WP.29-167-27 to express the view of the International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association (IPIECA) and CONCAWE on the proposal to amend R.E.3 on market fuel quality (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/111). She stated that these organizations disagreed with the proposal since it included fuel properties not related to the proper functioning or durability of vehicles or after-treatment systems. She questioned whether R.E.3 was the right place for this purpose. She referred to WP.29-167-26 submitted by the African Refiners Association (ARA) which also supporting this position. She requested WP.29 to withdraw ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/111 from the agenda and to continue the work at GRPE to reach consensus for a proposal acceptable to all stakeholders.

94. The Chair of GRPE clarified that GRPE had discussed and considered the concerns of CONCAWE and IPIECA at the last June 2015 session. He mentioned that the Contracting Parties to the 1958 Agreement endorsed the proposal and it had been then submitted to the November 2015 session of WP.29 for further consideration. He doubted that further technical discussion would lead to a consensus. The representatives of the Netherlands, Sweden and EU agreed with the Chair of GRPE and supported the vote on the proposal.

95. The representative of CONCAWE reiterated the position of CONCAWE and IPIECA and strongly disagreed with the need to push the proposal forward. She expressed the fear of stakeholders that including this proposal in the framework of the 1958 Agreement would eventually lead to its introduction into the framework of the 1998 Agreement. The Chair of GRPE responded that given the position of Contracting Parties to the 1998 Agreement, he did not expect proposals to amend Special Resolution No. 1 (S.R.1) under the 1998 Agreement.

96. WP.29 adopted ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/111 without objections or abstentions as an amendment to R.E.3.

97. The Chair of GRPE presented ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/110 on a new Mutual Resolution on vehicle propulsion system definitions. He underlined that the new Mutual Resolution would serve a basis for harmonization of definitions and terminology in all UN GTRs and UN Regulations. He clarified that the proposed M.R.2 would be further developed and could serve as a repository for definitions.

98. WP.29 adopted ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/110 without objections or abstentions and passed the proposal to AC.3 for voting.

99. The secretariat introduced the document WP.29-167-15, listing the proposals adopted by WP.29 at its March 2015 session and the situation of their entry into force.

100. The representative of the World Blind Union introduced WP.29-167-23 and WP.29-167-28 presenting the concerns of his organization on the recent proposal for a new Regulation on QRTV adopted by GRB in September 2015. He kindly requested further consideration related to the provisions on Audible Vehicle Alerting System (AVAS) sound pressure levels, optional installation of AVAS pause switches and sound emissions when stationary.

101. The representative of the United States of America informed WP.29 about the finalization of national legislation and recalled the current work on a UN GTR on QRTV which would provide a basis for global harmonization in this area.

102. The Chair of WP.29 recalled the decision to extend the mandates of both IWGs (see paras 24. and 139.). Therefore, WP.29 agreed to consider the draft proposal for a Regulation on QRTV at its March 2016 session and also agreed to consider later amendments addressing the concerns raised.

103. WP.29 expressed its gratitude for the work done by the representative of Australia, Mr. Robert Hogan, the representative of Hungary, Mr. Matyas Matolscy and the representative of ETRTO, Mr. George Dimitri.

104. In compliance with Rule 37 of the Rules of Procedure (TRANS/WP.29/690 as amended by ECE/TRANS/WP.29/690/Amends. 1 and 2), the World Forum called for the election of officers on 11 November 2015. At the proposal of the representative of EU, WP.29 unanimously elected Mr. B. Kisulenko (Russian Federation) as Chair and Mr. A. Erario (Italy) as Vice-Chair of the World Forum for 2016.

105. The World Forum adopted the report and its annexes on the basis of a draft prepared by the secretariat. The report includes the sections related to the Administrative Committee of the 1958 Agreement and to the Executive Committee of the 1998 Agreement.

106. Of the fifty-one Contracting Parties to the Agreement, thirty-nine were represented and established AC.1 for its sixty-first session held on 11 November 2015.

107. AC.1 invited Mr. B. Kisulenko, Chair of WP.29, to chair the session.

109. The forty-fifth session of the Executive Committee (AC.3) was held on 12 November 2015 and chaired by the representative of the United Kingdom. The representatives of 11 of the 35 Contracting Parties to the Agreement attended: Australia, Canada, the European Union (representing Cyprus, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom), India, Japan, Kazakhstan, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, South Africa, Turkey and the United States of America.

108. The results of the voting on the documents submitted can be found in the voting table of the session report.

110. The representative of the United States of America recalled the discussion on the trilateral white paper submitted by the representatives of Japan, the United States of America and the EU. He informed AC.3 that the original trilateral paper (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/108) had not changed since the June session of AC.3. He added that the comments received on the document were summarized in informal document WP.29-167-24 and that the authors of the trilateral white paper had addressed the comments received. AC.3 started considerations on the responses from the trilateral group to the comments presented in the informal document.

111. The representative of OICA welcomed the responses of the trilateral group to their comments. He suggested that items where mutual agreement existed could be reflected in the final document. He further noted that in practice the 98 Agreement and its UN GTRs do not offer the guarantee that products, complying with the UN GTR, are duly accepted in the markets of Contracting Parties, when the latter have not fully incorporated the UN GTR into their national law, as mandatory or alternative requirement.

112. AC.3 also considered WP.29-167-12 from MEMA/CLEPA/JAPIA. The representative of the three organizations made suggestions to define the programme of work, encouraged Contracting Parties to use domestic regulatory processes to communicate and share information for the sake of full transparency and public participation, such as “Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking” in the United States of America. She also reiterated a recommendation to WP.29 and AC.3 to establish basic criteria to identify priorities to address the development of UN GTRs and identify possible barriers in developing them.

113. The Chair of AC.3 summed up the discussion by highlighting the fundamental aspects that can improve the good functioning of the 1998 Agreement: (i) negotiation capacity in order to reach harmonization of regulations is essential, (ii) the process of negotiation must be inclusive and (iii) impact assessment studies and related difficulties in a Country (Contracting Party) should not stop other Contracting Parties from proceeding further.

114. Based on his experience in chairing development of UN GTR No.14, the representative of Australia stressed the need for negotiation and compromise in the UN GTR and 1998 Agreement process.

115. AC.3 discussed the use of modules and options within UN GTRs. In addition to alternatives for testing procedures, the use of options and modules in the UN GTR may sometimes be needed on a case by case basis but should be avoided as much as possible in order to safeguard maximum global harmonization and to permit to have a single product that complies with the UN GTR. The expert from ETRTO, based on his experience with the Tyre UN GTR, stated that when starting to develop a UN GTR, Contracting Parties need to deal with existing, different level of technologies that may not be solved at an early stage of the UN GTR development. He added that removing the possibility of modules or options in future UN GTRs may create difficulties. The representative of OICA considered that, while modules may be acceptable in some cases in order to reach acceptable levels of harmonization, contradictory options at the choice of the Contracting Parties should be avoided as much as possible and, if unavoidable for the adoption of the UN GTR, should eventually be solved in a second phase aimed at having unique harmonized vehicle design worldwide.

116. AC.3 also emphasized the need to improve the transposition of UN GTRs in national legislation, which is one of the main points of the trilateral paper.

117. The representative of the EU, announced that considerations on comments received from Transport and Environment (T&E) will be handled bilaterally and reported to AC3 at the March 2016 session.

118. AC.3 decided to keep WP.29-167-12, WP.29-167-24 and WP.29-167-30 on the agenda and to form a drafting group with representatives of OICA, CLEPA/MEMA/JAPIA, the Chair of AC.3 and other interested parties, to review the trilateral white paper.

119. No new information was provided for this agenda item.1

120. The proposed Mutual Resolution No. 2 (M.R.2) (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/110) was submitted for consideration and vote, and was adopted on 12 November 2015 by consensus vote of the following Contracting Parties present and voting: Australia, Canada, European Union (voting for Cyprus, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom), India, Japan, Kazakhstan, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, South Africa, Turkey and the United States of America.

121. No new information was provided for this agenda item.

122. No new information was provided for this agenda item.

123. The representative of the EU, on behalf of the Chair of the IWG on Environmental and Propulsion Performance Requirements (EPPR) for L-category vehicles, summarized the work progress of the group. He noted that progress had been made in two of the three priority subjects identified. He announced that EPPR IWG had submitted ECE/TRANS/GRPE/2016/2 on a new UN GTR on evaporative and crankcase emissions for consideration at the next GRPE session in January 2016. He added that this proposal would be submitted to the June 2016 session of AC.3, if adopted by GRPE in January 2016. He underlined that the IWG was already working on a new UN GTR on On-Board Diagnostics systems (OBD) with the intention to submit a first daft at the next GRPE session. He informed AC.3 that work on revising UN GTR No.2 would be resumed in 2016. He recalled the agreement by AC.3 at its last session with the extension of the mandate of the EPPR IWG until December 2020 as reproduced in ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/113.

124. The representative of EU announced that Mr. P. Åsman would step down as Chair of EPPR IWG as of 18 November 2015. He expressed his gratitude to Mr. Åsman for his commitment and excellent work. He informed AC.3 that Mr. A. Perujo from the Joint Research Centre would be the candidate to replace Mr. Åsman.

125. The representative of IMMA expressed her support for the updated mandate and welcomed Mr. Perujo as the new Chair of EPPR IWG. She thanked Mr. Åsman for the excellent work done and assured AC.3 that IMMA would continue to support the work of EPPR IWG. She recalled the priority on two-wheeled vehicles, whereas progressively other vehicles categories could be considered to be included.

126. AC.3 adopted ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2015/113 and requested the secretariat to convert it into an official AC.3 document.

127. The representative of Italy reported that an amendment to UN GTR No.3. had been adopted by AC.3 in March 2015. He announced that the activities on Regulation No. 78 would begin in GRRF. The secretariat added that informal discussions started on various subjects such as a scope extension, provisions for an ABS pause switch and the provisions for Emergency Stop Signal for motorcycles and that GRRF would have to come back to AC.3 to request authorization to amend UN GTR No. 3 as soon as the technical discussions became more substantial.

128. The representative of Germany, Chair of GRPE, reported that work was completed and that the amendment to UN GTR No. 4 had already been adopted by AC.3. AC.3 agreed to delete this agenda item and to continue technical discussion at the GRPE level as needed.

129. The representative of the Republic of Korea reported on the activities of the IWG on Panorama Sunroof Glazing (PSG) and announced that the next meeting of IWG would be held in February 2016 in Brussels.

130. AC.3 noted the report on the recent GRSG session (para.30) and agreed to endorse the revised Terms of Reference for the IWG together with the report of GRSG, at its March 2016 session.

131. The representative of Japan gave a status report of the work of the IWG. He reported that IWG had met on two occasions and had held one WebEx meeting to discuss primary injury criteria. He noted that the Group was waiting for output from Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHS) studies conducted by NHTSA. He added that this work would help establish pass/fail criteria. He added that the study performed by NHTSA had provided good data on the reproducibility and repeatability of the Bio Rear Impact Dummy (BioRID), but it has not been possible to determine the correlation between the dummy and PMHS. Work would therefore, be needed to establish statistical significance. He also informed AC.3 that the IWG was pursuing a more empirical approach to determine biomechanical criteria and that alternative approaches were under study. He reported that the IWG has transmitted an updated draft amendment to the UN GTR to GRSP for discussion at its December 2015 session and that the details of the proposal would be refined during a WebEx meeting before December 2015. He added that he expected a final proposal in May 2016 on UN GTR No. 7 and M.R.1 and that these would be brought to WP.29 in November 2016.

132. The representative of Germany, Chair of the IWG on Phase II of the UN GTR, reported that the situation remains unchanged since the June 2015 session of AC.3. He added that the Group was still waiting for information from the United States of America. The representative of the United States of America confirmed that new information on cost benefit analysis on the “legform” would be available by the December 2015 GRSP session. AC.3 decided to continue discussion on this item at its March 2016 session.

133. The representative of Germany, Chair of GRPE, reminded AC.3 that UN GTR No. 15 had been adopted in March 2014 (Phase 1a) and since then GRPE had been working on delivering a proposal for the first amendment (Phase 1b). He reported that the IWG on WLTP had submitted ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2016/3 corresponding to Phase 1b of its mandate for consideration at the next GRPE session in January 2016. He added that this proposal would be submitted to the June 2016 session of AC.3, if adopted by GRPE in January 2016. He presented WP.29-167-29, submitted by the representatives of Japan and EU as technical sponsors, requesting an extension of the mandate specifically for Phase 2. He informed AC.3 that this document had been endorsed at the last GRPE session in June 2015 and some minor amendments to the document were added.

134. AC.3 adopted WP.29-167-29 so that the IWG on WLTP can start Phase 2 activities immediately. AC.3 requested the secretariat to convert WP.29-167-29 into an official document for the March 2016 session of AC.3.

135. The representative of the Russian Federation informed AC.3 about the progress made by GRRF experts on the Phase 1b of the development of UN GTR No. 16 and that the goal was to complete work by November 2016.

136. The representative of the United States of America reported on the progress of the work by IWG on EVS (WP.29-167-21). He reminded AC.3 that this mandate was unique since four Contracting Parties to the Agreement have sponsored it. He underlined that the IWG faced difficulties on critical issues and areas where research was still ongoing. He explained that these issues include: (i) battery management system functionality, the water immersion test, the long-term fire resistance test, drop and rotation tests, the toxicity and corrosiveness of vented gas, thermal propagation in battery system, vehicle safety requirement during charging and scope expansion to the heavy duty vehicles. He added that, to complete this work and accomplish the original mandate, IWG had split the work into two phases. He explained that the Group would deliver what had been achieved so far in Phase 1 and would include the outcome of long-term research and future improvement in Phase 2. He finally asked AC.3 to grant extension of the mandate of the IWG until December 2016 to confirm the already scheduled work plan of the IWG which consists of three meetings in 2016 to complete Phase 1.

137. AC.3 endorsed the extension of the mandate and requested the secretariat to distribute WP.29-167-21 with an official symbol at its March 2016 session of AC.3.

138. The representative of France, as the Chair of GRB, reminded AC.3 that the mandate of the IWG on QRTV would expire at the end of November 2015. He asked for an extension of the mandate, so that the Group would have the opportunity to take in consideration the content of United States Rules that were expected to be published soon.

139. AC.3 adopted the proposal of the Chair of GRB to extend the mandate of the Group by one year.

140. No new information was provided for this agenda item.

141. No new information was provided for this agenda item.

142. AC.3 decided to remove this item from the agenda.

143. The representative of the United States of America informed AC.3 about the work progress of the IWG on this subject. He informed AC.3 about the change of the Chair of the IWG and about the issue of availability of specification of parts of the “5th percentile” female dummy and asked AC.3 for a further extension of the mandate.

144. AC.3 adopted the extension of the mandate of the IWG until December 2016 to allow completion of the IWG work plan.

145. No new information was provided for this agenda item.

146. The representative of Canada reported on the work progress made by the IWG on EVE in the following areas: (i) method of stating energy consumption led by China, (ii) battery performance and durability provisions led by Canada and the United States of America and (iii) determination of the power of electric vehicles led by Germany and the Republic of Korea. He informed AC.3 that the IWG had met on 19-20 October 2015 in Ottawa and will meet again in Geneva in January 2016. He underlined the good progress made by the IWG on EVE according to Part A of its mandate and noted that no guidelines were requested at this stage.

147. The representative of Germany, Chair of GRPE, clarified that guidelines will be requested from AC.3 in the future on the basis of the outcome of the investigation currently being carried out under Part A. He underlined the need to ensure a proper coordination between the IWGs on EVE and WLTP under GRPE to avoid any overlap of issues related to durability of vehicles and batteries.

148. The representative of Germany reminded AC.3 about the discussion held during WP.29 (see para. 42 above) and recommended to keep this agenda item in the March 2016 session of AC.3 for exchange of information.

149. No new information was provided for this agenda item.

150. No new information was provided for this agenda item.

151. No new proposal was raised.

152. No new information was provided for this agenda item.

154. Following the recommendation of WP.29, the Administrative Committee AC.4 did not convene (see para. 8 above).

153. No new information was provided for this agenda item.

155. No supplementary information was provided beyond agenda item 7.2. (see para. 77 above).

156. No supplementary information was provided beyond agenda item 7.2. (see para. 78 above)

157. No subject was raised under this item.