World Forum
World Forum for the Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations
177th session | Geneva | 11-15 Mar 2019 Download Copy
Agenda Item 4.11. | Consideration of pending proposals for amendments to existing UN Regulations submitted by the Working Parties subsidiary to the World Forum
Document(s)
WP.29/2018/91/Rev.1 | UN R3: Proposal for the 03 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/92/Rev.1 | UN R4: Proposal for the 01 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/93/Rev.1 | UN R6: Proposal for the 02 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/94/Rev.1 | UN R7: Proposal for the 03 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/95/Rev.1 | UN R19: Proposal for the 05 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/96/Rev.1 | UN R23: Proposal for the 01 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/97/Rev.1 | UN R27: Proposal for the 05 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/98/Rev.1 | UN R38: Proposal for the 01 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/99/Rev.2 | UN R48: Proposal for Supplement 12 to the 06 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/100/Rev.1 | UN R48: Proposal for Supplement 13 to the 05 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/101 | UN R48: Proposal for Supplement 18 to the 04 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/102 | UN R48: Proposal for Supplement 6 to the 03 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/103/Rev.1 | UN R50: Proposal for the 01 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/104/Rev.1 | UN R53: Proposal for Supplement 2 to the 02 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/105 | UN R53: Proposal for Supplement 20 to the 01 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/106/Rev.1 | UN R69: Proposal for the 02 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/107/Rev.1 | UN R70: Proposal for the 02 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/108/Rev.2 | UN R74: Proposal for Supplement 11 to the 01 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/109/Rev.1 | UN R77: Proposal for the 01 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/110/Rev.1 | UN R86: Proposal for Supplement 1 to the 01 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/111 | UN R86: Proposal for Supplement 7 to the original series of amendments
WP.29/2018/112/Rev.1 | UN R87: Proposal for the 01 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/113/Rev.1 | UN R91: Proposal for the 01 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/114/Rev.1 | UN R98: Proposal for the 02 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/115/Rev.1 | UN R104: Proposal for the 01 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/116/Rev.1 | UN R112: Proposal for the 02 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/117/Rev.1 | UN R113: Proposal for the 03 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/118/Rev.1 | UN R119: Proposal for the 02 series of amendments
WP.29/2018/119/Rev.1 | UN R123: Proposal for the 02 series of amendments

WP.29-177 Discussion

111. The World Forum considered the draft amendments under items 4.11.1 to 4.11.3 and recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting.

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112. The Chair of GRE presented amendment proposal contained in ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/91/Rev.1 to ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/119/Rev.1, under agenda items 4.11.4 to 4.11.32, to amend UN Regulations Nos. 3, 4, 6, 7, 19, 23, 27, 38, 48, 50, 53, 69, 70, 74, 77, 86, 87, 91, 98, 104, 112, 113, 119 and 123. WP.29 noted that these proposals had been the result of intensive work of GRE and its IWG on Simplification of Lighting and Light-Signalling Regulations, as well as that further intensive work by the groups was expected towards finalizing the process of simplification of the relevant UN Regulations. The World Forum recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting, subject to the following modification to ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/105 (Proposal for Supplement 20 to the 01 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 53), agenda item 4.11.18:

Paragraph 6.2.1.2. (a), replace “Class D or E of UN Regulation No. 113” by “Class B, D or E of UN Regulation No. 113”.

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Previous Discussion(s)

Working Party on Lighting and Light-signalling | Session 79 | 24-27 Apr 2018

1. The Working Party on Lighting and Light-Signalling (GRE) held its seventy-ninth session from 24 to 27 April 2018 in Geneva, under the chairmanship of Mr. M. Loccufier (Belgium). Experts from the following countries participated in the work according to Rule 1 (a) of the Rules of Procedure of the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29) (TRANS/WP.29/690, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/690/Amends. 1 and 2):

  1. Austria
  2. China
  3. Czechia
  4. Finland
  5. France
  6. Germany
  7. Hungary
  8. India
  9. Italy
  10. Japan
  11. Latvia
  12. Luxembourg
  13. Netherlands
  14. Norway
  15. Poland
  16. Republic of Korea
  17. Spain
  18. United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (UK)
  19. United States of America
  20. Viet Nam.
An expert from the European Commission (EC) participated. Experts from the following non governmental organizations also took part in the session:
  1. European Association of Automotive Suppliers (CLEPA)
  2. International Automotive Lighting and Light Signalling Expert Group (GTB)
  3. International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC)
  4. International Motorcycle Manufacturers Association (IMMA)
  5. International Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers (OICA)
  6. Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE).

2. GRE considered and adopted the agenda (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/1), as reproduced in GRE-79-01 together with the informal documents distributed during the session. GRE also noted the running order proposed by the Chair (GRE-79-02).

3. The list of informal documents is contained in Annex I to the session report. The list of GRE informal groups is reproduced in Annex XII to the report.

4. GRE took note of the highlights of the November 2017 and March 2017 sessions of WP.29 and the official document submission deadline of 27 July 2018 for the October 2018 session of GRE (GRE-79-15).

5. Mr. W. Nissler, WP.29 Secretary and Chief, Vehicle Regulations and Transport Innovations Section, reported on the main results of the February 2018 session of the Inland Transport Committee (ITC) and of the March 2018 session of WP.29. He also briefed GRE on Resolution A/RES/72/271 “Improving global road safety” adopted on 12 April 2018 by the General Assembly of the United Nations as well as on the launch of the United Nations Road Safety Trust Fund.

6. The expert from GTB pointed out the growing interest in global harmonization of lighting and light-signalling norms, in particular in China and the United States of America. According to him, stage 2 of the ongoing process for Simplification of the Lighting and Light-signalling Regulations (SLR), which focused on technology-neutral requirements, could pave the way to developing of a new Global Technical Regulation (GTR). He also identified light-signalling functions of autonomous vehicles as a possible topic for a new GTR. The experts from the Netherlands, UK, EC, OICA and SAE supported this idea. The expert from the United States of America encouraged all stakeholders to start a dialogue on this issue.

7. No information was reported under this agenda item.

8. On behalf of the Informal Working Group on Simplification of the Lighting and Light-Signalling Regulations (IWG SLR), the expert from GTB reported on the finalization of stage 1 of SLR (GRE-79-28). He further provided a draft schedule for stage 2 which would include two steps. Step 1 would cover objectives which could be achieved by the end of 2019, such as introducing technology neutral and performance based requirements, as well as objectively testable provisions. Step 2 would start in 2020 with the aim to simplify the installation Regulations Nos. 48, 53, 74 and 86. As an additional task, he suggested harmonization with the applicable standards in China. GRE experts also proposed other issues for stage 2 of SLR.

9. The expert from GTB presented the full package of amendment proposals drafted by IWG SLR under stage 1 of SLR:

a) The three new simplified UN Regulations on Light-Signalling Devices (LSD), Road Illumination Devices (RID) and Retro-Reflective Devices (RRD) (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/2, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/3, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/4, GRE-79-10 and GRE-79-14);

b) Draft amendments to Regulations Nos. 48, 53, 74 and 86 that group the definitions and introduce references to the new simplified Regulations (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/6, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/7, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/8, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/9, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/10, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/12, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/13, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/14, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/15, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/17, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/30, GRE-79-08, GRE-79-09 and GRE-79-13);

c) Transitional provisions to “freeze” Regulations Nos. 3, 4, 6, 7, 19, 23, 27, 38, 50, 69, 70, 77, 87, 91, 98, 104, 112, 113, 119 and 123 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/11).

10. The expert from EC was not in a position to support the indefinite validity of type approvals granted under the frozen Regulations, as proposed in ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/11, because of the General Safety Regulation of the European Union. He proposed revised transitional provisions for these Regulations (GRE-79-31, part I), together with new transitional provisions for the installation Regulations Nos. 48, 53, 74 and 86 (GRE-79-31, part II). While several experts agreed in principle with part I, they were not in a position to support part II. The experts from Finland and UK made study reservations. The expert from OICA expressed the concern that the revised transitional provisions might be rejected by WP.29.

11. To not delay the submission of the whole package of amendment proposals that had been developed in stage 1 of SLR, GRE decided to provisionally adopt the transitional provisions in ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/11, but to put in square brackets the third transitional provision for each Regulation mentioned in the document. At the same time, GRE recognized the urgency of the issue raised by the expert from EC and requested all GRE experts, as well as IWG SLR, to carefully consider the EC proposals with a view to taking a final position at the next session.

12. The expert from IWG SLR proposed correcting minor errors and inconsistencies identified in the documents mentioned under para. 9 (a) above (GRE-79-14). GRE adopted these corrections, as laid down in Annex II.

13. The expert from IWG SLR also suggested rectifying minor errors and inconsistencies in the documents listed in para. 9 (b) above (GRE-79-13). GRE adopted these corrections, as laid down in Annex III, and decided to opt for the alternative wording (in square brackets) of paragraph 6.3.9. of different series of amendments to Regulation No. 48.

14. The expert from India suggested corrections to ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/2 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/3 (GRE-79-17-Rev.1 and GRE-79-18-Rev.1 new text). GRE adopted the corrections, as laid down in Annexes IV and V. The expert from India withdrew GRE-79-19, in order to first present it at the next session of IWG SLR.

15. The expert from IWG SLR recalled that all identical definitions should only be kept in Regulation No. 48. Thus, he proposed to review the definitions in Regulations Nos. 53 and 74 (GRE-79-08 and GRE-79-09, respectively). GRE adopted these modifications, as contained in Annex VI.

16. The expert from IWG SLR presented the concept of “change index” developed for the LSD, RID and RRD Regulations (GRE-79-12-Rev.1). He further introduced amendment proposals on the change index to Regulations Nos. 48, 53, 74 and 86 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/16, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/18 and GRE-79-11). GRE adopted these proposals, as amended by Annex VII). In addition, GRE agreed to include transitional provisions on the change index in the text of the LSD, RID and RRD Regulations (GRE-79-10 and Annex VIII). The expert from India pointed out that he would refer GRE-79-22 to IWG SLR.

17. Subject to the modifications mentioned in paras. 10–16 above, GRE adopted the package of amendment proposals drafted by IWG SLR and listed in para. 9 a) – c). The secretariat was requested to submit the amendments proposals to WP.29 and to the Administrative Committee of the 1958 Agreement (AC.1) for consideration and vote at their November 2018 sessions. GRE noted that any modification of the transitional provisions, mentioned in para. 11 above, that GRE might agree upon at the next GRE session in October 2018, would be submitted to the November 2018 session of WP.29 as corrigenda to the basic SLR package which otherwise would be issued in August 2018.

18. The expert of SAE proposed to keep Regulations Nos. 98, 112, 113 and 123 “alive” for the purpose of the recently updated Canadian Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (CMVSS) No. 108 (GRE-79-32-Rev.1). GRE referred this document to IWG SLR for consideration.

19. The expert from IEC proposed amendments to Regulations Nos. 37, 99 and 128 that aligned the approval code for light sources with the approval number as prescribed by Revision 3 of the 1958 Agreement (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/21 and GRE-78-18). GRE adopted the amendments and requested the secretariat to submit them to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration and vote at their November 2018 sessions.

20. On behalf of the Task Force on LED retrofits and substitutes (TF SR), the expert from Germany presented their status report (GRE-79-16). GRE supported the proposed two-step approach and mechanical interlock as a solution to avoid misuse of light emitting diode (LED) substitutes.

21. GRE recalled the earlier proposals by GTB to introduce LED substitutes and replaceable light sources into the new LSD and RID Regulations (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2017/14, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2017/15 and GRE-78-04) and noted that ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2017/15 had been incorporated in ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/3. GRE invited TF SR to update ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2017/14 and GRE-78-04.

22. The expert from GTB pointed out that the GTB guidelines for introducing and evaluating LED light source categories that were intended for forward lighting applications (GRE-77-04) should be published as a reference document on the GRE website. GRE agreed to this request.

33. The expert from IMMA presented amendments to Regulation No. 50 regarding inward geometric visibility requirements for rear position lamps, together with corresponding proposal for amendments to regulation No. 53 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/27 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/28). GRE generally supported these proposals, but recalled its earlier decision to “freeze” Regulation No. 50 which would be replaced by the new LSD regulation. Therefore, GRE invited IMMA to resubmit the proposals once the LSD Regulation would have entered into force.

23. The expert from GTB proposed to harmonize the switching requirements for side-marker and position lamps when mutually incorporated (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2017/24). GRE adopted this proposal and requested the secretariat to submit it to WP.29 and to the Administrative Committee of the 1958 Agreement (AC.1) for consideration and vote at their November 2018 sessions as a draft Supplement 11 to the 06 series of amendments to Regulation No. 48. The expert from France corrected the French text of the adopted amendment (Annex IX).

24. The expert from OICA introduced a revised proposal which defined and described the operation of the external status indicator for vehicle alarm systems, alarm systems and immobilizers, as contained in Regulations Nos. 97 and 116 (GRE-77-25-Rev.2). Following an in-depth discussion, GRE adopted this proposal, as contained in Annex X, and requested the secretariat to submit it to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration and vote at their November 2018 sessions as a draft Supplement 11 to the 06 series of amendments and a draft Supplement 12 to the 05 series of amendments to Regulation No. 48.

25. The expert from GTB proposed correcting errors and discrepancies in the text of the 05 and 06 series of amendments to Regulation No. 48 (GRE-78-05). GRE adopted the proposals, as contained in Annex XI, and requested the secretariat to submit them to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration and vote at their November 2018 sessions as a draft Supplement 11 to the 06 series of amendments and a draft Supplement 12 to the 05 series of amendments to Regulation No. 48. GRE also requested GTB to verify whether or not these amendments are relevant for the 03 and 04 series of amendments to Regulation No. 48 and to report back to GRE at its next session in October 2018.

26. The experts from the Task Force on Headlamp Switching (TF HS) and from SAE introduced alternative proposals which corrected and clarified the requirements for Daytime Running Lamps (DRL) (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/20, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/22 and GRE-79-26). The expert from Japan commented on the proposals (GRE-79-03-Rev.1). Following a brief exchange of views, GRE invited the Co-Chairs of TF HS to prepare a consolidated proposal for consideration at the next session.

27. The expert from Czechia proposed to correct and clarify the requirements for DRLs in conjunction with rear position lamps (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2017/23). GRE invited the Co-Chairs of TF HS to take these proposals into account when preparing a consolidated document.

28. The experts of Germany and Italy proposed a new series of amendments to Regulation No. 48 to clarify the DRL switching-off conditions and/or light intensity reduction when DRL and front direction indicators were totally or partially reciprocally incorporated and when the distance between them was equal or less than 40 mm (GRE-79-25). The expert from OICA submitted a counter-proposal (GRE-79-30). GRE invited the proponents to prepare a consolidated document for the next session.

29. The expert from Poland provided a summary of initial aiming and levelling tolerance issue (GRE-79-23, GRE-79-24). The experts from Italy and the Netherlands briefly introduced GRE-79-29 as a discussion paper for the possible introduction of new requirements for headlamp levelling, in particular on the vertical inclination in relation to the dipped-beam headlamp mounting height. GRE agreed to keep GRE-79-29 as a reference document for the next session.

30. GRE noted the slow progress in the work of the Informal Working Group on Visibility, Glare and Levelling (IWG-VGL). To advance the topic, the expert from GTB proposed to bring together various experts on glare and levelling issues for a one-day event, in conjunction with the next session of GRE. GRE supported this idea.

31. GRE took note that WP.29 had extended the mandate of IWG VGL for the year 2018 and recalled its request to IWG VGL to revise its Terms of Reference. The expert from Poland presented his proposals (GRE-79-33). Due to the late availability of GRE-79-33, GRE decided to revert to this issue at the next session. Some experts were of the view that IWG VGL had completed phase I of its mandate and that phase II should be taken over by IWG SLR to avoid duplication in the work of the two IWGs. The Chair invited IWG SLR to address this issue at the next sessions.

32. On behalf of the Task Force on Electromagnetic Compatibility (TF EMC), the expert from OICA presented a status report (GRE-79-04) and revised amendment proposals to Regulation No. 10 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/5 and GRE-79-05). The expert from India suggested a minor modification (GRE-79-21). The expert from France proposed to extend paragraph 2.12. on immunity-related functions with the aim to cover new car systems recently introduced by other Regulations (GRE-79-27). The expert from EC was of the view that the transitional provisions in ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/5 should be checked for consistency. He further pointed out the need to align the provisions on charging with the new GTR on safety of electric vehicles. The expert from the United States of America called for cooperation between TF EMC and IWG on Electric Vehicle Safety. The expert from OICA invited all interested parties to take part in the next TF EMC meeting in May 2018 (GRE-79-34) and/or provide their written comments to TF EMC before July 2018, to facilitate preparing revised amendment proposals for consideration at the next session of GRE.

34. On behalf of the Special Interest Group for DRL of L-category vehicles, the expert from Japan proposed a new requirement for automatic switching from DRL to the headlamp for L3 category (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/19). The expert from India suggested deletion of the wording “passing beam” from the text (GRE-79-20). Some GRE experts supported in principal ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/19, but expressed concerns about the proposed introduction of a new category of daytime running lamps with the maximum luminous intensity of 700 cd. GRE invited experts to send their comments to the Special Interest Group and agreed to continue consideration of the proposal at the next session.

35. The expert from IMMA proposed to clarify that direction indicators may be activated to show the vehicle status when the engine is stopped (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/25). The experts from Finland, Italy and Netherlands recalled that Regulation No. 48 in similar situations makes clear references to Regulations Nos. 97 and 116. The Chair invited IMMA to consider its proposal in line with the logic of Regulation No. 48.

36. The expert from IMMA introduced a revised proposal which allowed the use of different stop lamp activation methods and aligned the stop lamp provisions with those applicable for four-wheelers (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/29). GRE adopted the proposal and mandated the secretariat to submit it to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration and vote at their November 2018 sessions as a draft Supplement 20 to the 01 series of amendments to Regulation No. 53 and as a draft Supplement 2 to the 02 series of amendments to Regulation No. 53.

37. The expert from IMMA presented a proposal on exterior courtesy lamps (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/26). The experts from Austria and Netherlands asked for clarification under which motorcycle rest positions (main and/or side) the courtesy lamps would be activated. GRE agreed to revert to this issue at the next session.

38. The expert from IMMA proposed to align the text of Regulation No. 53 with Regulation No. 48 and to correct a mistake in the past amendment process (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2017/26). GRE adopted the proposal and mandated the secretariat to submit it to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration and vote at their November 2018 sessions as a draft Supplement 20 to the 01 series of amendments to Regulation No. 53 and as a draft Supplement 2 to the 02 series of amendments to Regulation No. 53.

39. The expert from India presented GRE-78-24, which replaced GRE-77-08, with the aim to make, under certain conditions, the front position lamp optional for L3 category of vehicles. The experts from Austria, Italy, Finland and Netherlands pointed out the need to study this proposal in more detail. The Chair invited the expert from India to submit an official document for consideration at the next session.

40. GRE noted that GRE-77-09, GRE-77-17 and GRE-78-22, which had not been addressed at the previous sessions due to lack of time, had been superseded by other proposals considered at this session.

41. The expert from the Netherlands briefly presented ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/23 to initiate a discussion on the possible mandatory installation of direction indicators on mopeds. The Chair invited experts to provide their comments to the expert from the Netherlands before the end of May with a view to preparing a revised proposal for consideration at the next session.

42. The expert from Czechia proposed to clarify the requirements of driving and passing beam headlamps for mopeds (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/24). GRE adopted the proposal and requested the secretariat to submit it to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration and vote at their November 2018 sessions as a draft Supplement 10 to the 01 series of amendments to Regulation No. 74.

43. The Secretary of the Global Forum for Road Traffic Safety (WP.1) briefed GRE on the outcome of the March 2018 session of WP.1. In particular, WP.1 had nearly finalized considering the amendment proposals to Article 32 and Chapter II of Annex 5 on lighting and light-signalling (ECE/TRANS/WP.1/2017/1 ). A summary of the WP.1 discussions could be found in the session’s report (ECE/TRANS/WP.1/163, paras. 10-12 ). According to the WP.1 Secretary, the Global Forum would finalize the amendment proposals at its next regular session in September 2018. He also pointed out that, in May 2018, WP.1 would hold an extraordinary meeting to consider a Draft resolution on the deployment of highly and fully automated vehicles in road traffic (ECE/TRANS/WP.1/2018/4/Rev.1 ). The Chair invited GRE experts to review ECE/TRANS/WP.1/2017/1 and to provide their comments, if any, to the secretariat.

44. GRE recalled the developments in field of road safety mentioned in the opening statement (para. 5).

45. GRE noted that UN Regulation No. 0 on the International Whole Vehicle Type Approval (IWVTA) had been adopted at the November 2017 sessions of WP.29 and AC.1 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2017/108) and was expected to enter into force in July 2018.

46. No information was reported on this topic.

47. The experts of France and Germany initiated a discussion on how to treat lamps with apparent surfaces in the form of a company logo or other brand-identifying figures (GRE-78-03). The experts from Finland, France, Italy Netherlands, Poland, Spain and UK reported on their national experiences on the subject. GRE noted that, in many countries, specific illuminated advertisement on vehicles was prohibited. However, no clear restrictions existed for lamps which otherwise met the requirements of lighting and light-signalling Regulations, and particularly of Regulation No. 48. GRE was also informed about optional additional lamps that were allowed in some countries for the purposes of road safety, for example, additional direction indicators for trucks in the form of a cyclist. The experts from France and Germany pointed out that they would distribute a questionnaire to GRE experts to solicit detailed information on relevant national practices. In addition, the expert from the Netherlands suggested establishing a task force. GRE agreed to revert to this issue at the next session, based on the outcome of the survey.

48. The expert from SAE informed GRE about the recent changes of the national regulation on motor vehicle lighting and light signalling in Canada and of the associated technical standard document (GRE-79-06 and GRE-79-07). GRE took note of this information.

49. The expert from GTB briefed GRE on the issues that had been addressed at the GTB forum on lighting for automated vehicles in February 2018 (GRE-79-35 and GRE-79-36). GRE noted that this topic would also be raised at the June 2018 session of the WP.29 IWGs on Intelligent Transport Systems and Automated Driving.

50. GRE provided no guidance on the provisional agenda for the next session.

Working Party on Lighting and Light-signalling | Session 80 | 23-26 Oct 2018

1. The Working Party on Lighting and Light-Signalling (GRE) held its eightieth session from 23 to 26 October 2018 in Geneva, under the chairmanship of Mr. M. Loccufier (Belgium). Experts from the following countries participated in the work according to Rule 1 (a) of the Rules of Procedure of the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29) (TRANS/WP.29/690, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/690/Amends. 1 and 2): Belgium, China, Czechia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Republic of Korea, Serbia, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (UK). An expert from the European Commission (EC) participated. Experts from the following non governmental organizations also took part in the session: European Association of Automotive Suppliers (CLEPA), International Automobile Federation (FIA), International Automotive Lighting and Light Signalling Expert Group (GTB), International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), International Motorcycle Manufacturers Association (IMMA), International Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers (OICA), Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE).

2. GRE considered and adopted the agenda (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/31), as reproduced in GRE-80-01 together with the informal documents distributed during the session. GRE also noted the running order proposed by the Chair (GRE-80-11).

3. The list of informal documents is contained in Annex I to the report. The list of GRE informal groups is reproduced in Annex V to the session report.

4. GRE took note of the highlights of the June 2018 session of WP.29 and the official document submission deadline of 18 January 2019 for the April 2019 session of GRE (GRE-80-15).

28. On behalf of the Special Interest Group for DRL of L-category vehicles, the expert from Japan presented a revised proposal that introduced a new requirement for automatic switching from DRL to the headlamp for L3 category in UN Regulation No. 53 as well as a corresponding amendment to the new LSD UN Regulation (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/50). The expert from India proposed to delete references to “passing beam” (GRE-80-25). The experts of Germany, Netherlands, UK and EC were not in favour of deleting “passing beam” and supported the original proposal. GRE adopted the proposal and requested the secretariat to submit it to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their June 2019 sessions as draft 03 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 53 and draft Supplement 1 to the original LSD UN Regulation, subject to the following amendments:

Paragraphs 5.11.1.1., 5.11.1.2. and Annex 7 (twice), replace “headlamp [(passing beam)]” with “passing beam”.

Paragraphs 11.8. and 11.10., remove square brackets around 2023.

29. The expert from India proposed making optional the fitment of front position lamps, due to the introduction of auto headlamp switching, and alternatively DRL provisions in UN Regulation No. 53 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/47 and GRE-80-26). The experts of Finland, Germany and UK expressed doubts. The Chair concluded that there was not enough support for the proposal and proposed to revert to this issue at the next session. He also invited the expert from India to try to convince the experts in doubt before the next session.

30. The expert from IMMA proposed to clarify the use of direction indicators to show the status of the device for protection of a vehicle against unauthorised use (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/45). GRE adopted the proposal and requested the secretariat to submit it to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their March 2019 sessions as draft Supplement 3 to the 02 series and draft Supplement 21 to the 01 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 53.

31. The expert from IMMA presented a revised proposal on exterior courtesy lamps (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/46). GRE adopted the proposal and requested the secretariat to submit it to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their March 2019 sessions as draft Supplement 3 to the 02 series and draft Supplement 21 to the 01 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 53, subject to the following modification:

New paragraph 6.15.19.3., second indent, delete “…one or more of…”.

27. The expert from OICA, on behalf of the Task Force on Electromagnetic Compatibility (TF EMC), presented their progress report (GRE-80-12-Rev.1) and revised proposals for the 06 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 10 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/43 and GRE-80-13). For L-category vehicles, the expert of IMMA proposed to limit the scope of this UN Regulation to categories L6 and L7 only (GRE-80-31). GRE supported the IMMA proposal. The expert of Japan proposed to exclude agricultural vehicles (categories T, R and S) from the scope (GRE-80-24). Following a discussion, the expert from Japan was in a position to accept categories T, R and S in the scope. Finally, GRE adopted the amendment proposals, as amended by Annex IV, and requested the secretariat to submit them to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their March 2019 sessions as a new 06 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 10.

32. The expert from the Netherlands presented an updated proposal that required the mandatory installation of direction indicators on mopeds. (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/52). Following a brief discussion, GRE invited the proponent to redraft the transitional provisions and to submit a revised document for consideration to the next session.

5. GRE noted that, in the future, a new UN Global Technical Regulation (UN GTR) could be developed under stage 2 of the simplification of the lighting and light-signalling UN Regulations (SLR) (see para. 7 below) or as a result of consideration of light-signalling functions of automated/autonomous vehicles (see para. 40 below).

6. No information was reported under this agenda item.

7. The Secretary of the Informal Working Group “Simplification of the Lighting and Light-Signalling UN Regulations” (IWG SLR) presented their progress report (GRE-80-30) and proposed revising its Terms of Reference (GRE-80-14). Following an in-depth discussion, GRE agreed that stage 2 of IWG SLR should take over the outcome of the Informal Working Group on Visibility, Glare and Levelling (IWG VGL), and so, adopted the revised Terms of Reference and Rules of Procedure of IWG SLR, as laid down in Annex II. GRE mandated its Chair to seek the consent of WP.29, at its November 2018 session, to extend the mandate of IWG SLR until the end of 2022. At the same time, GRE agreed not to extend the mandate of IWG VGL beyond 2018.

8. GRE was informed that the full package of amendment proposals drafted by IWG SLR under stage 1 of SLR, including the three new simplified UN Regulations on Light-Signalling Devices (LSD), Road Illumination Devices (RID) and Retro-Reflective Devices (RRD), in August 2018 had been submitted to WP.29 and to the Administrative Committee of the 1958 Agreement (AC.1) for consideration at their November 2018 sessions. GRE noted that the SLR package, if adopted, would be scheduled to enter into force at the end of May – beginning of June 2019. Therefore, under the above assumption, the June 2019 sessions of WP.29 and AC.1 would provide for the very first opportunity to introduce amendments to the new LSD, RID and RRD UN Regulations.

9. GRE recalled that, at its previous session, it had provisionally adopted transitional provisions to “freeze” UN Regulations Nos. 3, 4, 6, 7, 19, 23, 27, 38, 50, 69, 70, 77, 87, 91, 98, 104, 112, 113, 119 and 123 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/11), with square brackets around the third transitional provision on the validity of existing type approvals, and had agreed to take a final decision at this session (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/79, paras. 11 and 17). The Secretary of IWG SLR presented the revised transitional provisions (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/34) which propose the deletion of the third transitional provision for all concerned UN Regulations. The expert from OICA expressed concerns that this deletion might lead to different interpretation among type approval authorities and that some of them might question the validity of existing type approvals (GRE-80-21). GRE confirmed that the revised transitional provisions, as proposed in ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/34, do not affect the validity of type approvals already granted pursuant to the UN Regulations concerned.

10. Upon this understanding, GRE adopted ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/34 and requested the secretariat to submit it to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their November 2018 sessions as corrigenda to the original SLR package. GRE also expressed a hope that, in spite of the late submission of these modifications, contracting parties would be in a position to take them into consideration and to vote for the complete updated SLR package in November 2018.

11. The Secretary of IWG SLR introduced the first proposals for amendments to the original versions of the LSD, RID and RRD UN Regulations (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/36, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/37 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/38). GRE adopted these proposals and noted that some of these amendments were essentially corrections of errors in the original SLR package while others were improvements. GRE stressed the need to rectify the discovered errors, such as the correction of Table 9 in the RID UN Regulation (as proposed in ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/37) and the correction of Annex 7 of the RRD UN Regulation (as proposed in ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/38) and requested the secretariat to submit these corrections to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their November 2018 sessions as corrigenda to the original SLR package. The “improvement” amendments would be submitted to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their June 2019 sessions, as explained in para. 8 above.

12. The experts from IWG SLR and IMMA proposed to amend the inboard visibility angle for rear position lamps in pairs in the new LSD UN Regulation (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/33 and GRE-80-32). GRE adopted the proposal and requested the secretariat to submit it to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their June 2018 sessions as draft Supplement 1 to the original LSD UN Regulation. GRE also recalled that this modification should be submitted together with the corresponding proposal to amend UN Regulation No. 53 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/28), which had been agreed upon at the previous session, and requested the secretariat to submit it to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their June 2019 sessions as draft Supplement 4 to the 02 series and draft Supplement 22 to the 01 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 53.

13. The expert from IMMA proposed a modification to the presentation on change index (GRE-79-12-Rev.1). GRE adopted the modification and requested the secretariat to publish the revised presentation as a reference document on the GRE website.

14. The expert of SAE presented collective amendments to UN Regulations Nos. 98, 112, 113 and 123 for the purposes of the recently updated Canadian Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (CMVSS) No. 108 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/32). GRE adopted the proposals and requested the secretariat to submit them to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their June 2019 sessions as draft Supplement 1 to the new 02 series of amendments of UN Regulation No. 98, draft Supplement 1 to the 02 series of amendments of UN Regulation No. 112, draft Supplement 1 to the 03 series of amendments of UN Regulation No. 113 and draft Supplement 1 to the 02 series of amendments of UN Regulation No. 123.

15. The expert from IMMA proposed amended definitions for UN Regulation No. 53 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/35 and GRE-80-05). GRE adopted the proposals and requested the secretariat to submit them to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their June 2019 sessions as draft Supplement 4 to the 02 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 53.

16. GRE was informed about the progress of the Task Force on Substitutes and Retrofits (TF SR) (GRE-80-23). GRE noted that TF SR had prepared proposals on the use of light emitting diode (LED) substitute light sources for light-signalling applications (see below) and would continue with LED substitutes for front-lighting applications.

17. On behalf of TF SR, the expert from Germany introduced amendment proposals to UN Regulation No. 128 for the use of LED substitute light sources (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/39) as well as corresponding amendments to the Consolidated Resolution on the common specification of light source categories (R.E.5) (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/40). GRE adopted the proposals and requested the secretariat to submit them to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their March 2019 sessions as draft Supplement 9 to the original version of UN Regulation No. 128 and as draft amendment 3 to R.E.5. GRE noted that both amendments are part of the same package and should enter into force on the same date.

18. To introduce requirements for LED substitute light sources in the installation UN Regulations, the expert from Germany presented collective amendments to UN Regulations Nos. 48, 53, 74 and 86 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/41). The expert from OICA submitted comments (GRE-80-19). GRE adopted the proposals unamended and requested the secretariat to submit them to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their June 2019 sessions as draft Supplement 12 to the 06 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 48, draft Supplement 4 to the 02 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 53, draft Supplement 11 to the 01 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 74 and draft Supplement 2 to the 01 series of amendments of UN Regulation No. 86.

19. The expert from Germany also introduced equivalence criteria for LED substitute light source categories which substitute the corresponding filament light source categories (GRE-80-02), as well as the interlock solution, for the BA15-cap system developed by IEC (GRE-80-03). GRE decided to keep GRE-80-02 as a reference document and took note of GRE-80-03.

20. GRE also considered a parallel proposal by TF SR which introduced requirements for the use of LED substitute light sources in the new LSD UN Regulation (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/42). GRE adopted the proposal, as amended by Annex III, and requested the secretariat to submit them to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their June 2019 sessions.

21. The expert of SAE delivered a presentation on standardization of technical requirements for forward lighting LED replacement light sources (GRE-80-34) and offered to organize a live demonstration at the next session of GRE. The expert from FIA highlighted the advantages of using LED retrofits for front lighting application of vehicles in use and argued in favour of developing regulations in this area (GRE-80-33). He suggested that TF SR should prepare proposals. In this regard, some GRE experts expressed doubts whether this issue could be solved by UN Regulations and felt that it should be treated within national law. Those experts were also of the view that TF SR should finalize LED substitutes for front-lighting applications and then stop its activities without addressing LED retrofits. GRE decided to revert to this discussion at the next session and requested TF SR to continue its work in the interim.

22. The expert of GTB introduced amendment proposals that modified light source category LR4 in UN Regulation No. 128 and in the Consolidated Resolution R.E.5 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/48, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/49 and Add.1). GRE adopted the proposals and requested the secretariat to submit them to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their March 2019 sessions as draft Supplement 9 to the original version of UN Regulation No. 128 and draft amendment 3 to R.E.5. GRE noted that both amendments are part of the same package and should enter into force on the same date.

23. The expert from GTB introduced amendment proposals with the aim to reduce discomfort glare from rear signalling lamps when viewed at close proximity in slow moving traffic (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/51). The expert from OICA suggested further improvements (GRE-80-20). Following an exchange of comments, GRE invited GTB, OICA and other interested parties to produce a revised document for consideration at the next session.

24. GRE considered a proposal for a new 07 series of amendments prepared by the former Co-Chairs of the Task Force on Headlamp Switching (TF HS), which updated the requirements for headlamps and daytime running lamps (DRL) (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2018/44, GRE-80-09 and GRE-80-10). The experts from EC and Japan, Russian Federation, OICA and SAE commented on the proposal (respectively, GRE-80-22, GRE-80-29, GRE-80-18 and GRE-80-07). Separately, the expert from EC proposed a new requirement of mandatory presence of emergency stop signal (ESS) on all categories of motor vehicles and trailers (GRE-80-08) and the expert from SAE submitted an amendment proposal on side retro-reflectors (GRE-80-17).

25. Following a brief exchange of views on the above proposals, GRE noted that each of them would require a new series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 48 with its own transitional provisions. To avoid amending this UN Regulation too many times and practical complications, GRE was of the view that all proposals should be consolidated into a single new 07 series of amendments. The expert from OICA offered to host in December 2018, at their premises in Paris, a special meeting of interested parties with a view to drafting a consolidated proposal for the next session of GRE.

26. The expert of GTB reported on the outcome of the Forum on Glare and Visibility that had been organized by GTB on 22 October 2018. GRE noted that all presentations from the Forum would be published on the GRE website and requested IWG SLR to take them into account when considering stage 2 of the SLR process.

33. GRE noted that the Global Forum for Road Traffic Safety (WP.1), at its recent session in September 2018, continued considering the amendment proposals to Article 32 and Chapter II of Annex 5 on lighting and light-signalling (ECE/TRANS/WP.1/2017/1/Rev.1) and is expected to finalize this activity in March 2019. At its next session, GRE may expect an oral report from the WP.1 Secretary.

34. GRE was briefed on the recent developments in field of road safety at the ECE level.

35. GRE noted a request by IWG on the International Whole Vehicle Type Approval (IWVTA) to amend approval numbering in UN Regulations Nos. 37, 99 and 128 to align it with Schedule 4 of the revised 1958 Agreement (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1139, para. 67). GRE recalled that, at its previous session, it had already adopted the necessary amendments which were subsequently submitted to the November 2018 session of WP.29 as documents ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/83, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/89 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/90.

36. The expert from Germany briefly mentioned draft amendments to the LSD Regulation on the sun load impact (phantom effect) (GRE-80-27) and stated that a formal proposal would be submitted to the next session of GRE.

37. The experts of France and Germany presented the preliminary results of their questionnaire on national treatment of evocative, suggestive or figurative apparent surfaces (GRE-80-28). GRE noted that the reported results seemed to indicate the need to harmonize national regulations on the issue. GRE decided to continue this discussion at the next session, based on a more detailed document to be prepared by the experts from France and Germany.

38. Due to lack of time, GRE decided to consider GRE-80-06 at the next session.

39. GRE noted that Mr. V. Genone (Italy), who had participated in GRE activities since 1984, would no longer attend its sessions, due to his imminent retirement. GRE gave him a standing ovation for his dedication and extensive contributions to the work of GRE and wished him success in the future.

40. The expert from GTB introduced a brainstorming paper on signalling requirements for automated/autonomous vehicles (AVs) (GRE-80-16-Rev.1). The secretariat also informed GRE about the establishment, at the June 2018 session of WP.29, of a new Working Party “Groupe de Rapporteurs pour les Véhicules Autonomes” (GRVA) and that coordination between GRVA and other WP.29 Working Parties (GRs) would be done at the WP.29 level. GRE discussed at length how to pursue considering the signalling requirements for AVs, and came to a conclusion that a task force (TF) would be most appropriate for this purpose. The expert from Germany, who was leading TF SR, also agreed to take the lead in the new TF. The experts from UK, GTB and OICA expressed their support to TF. GRE agreed that TF should evaluate and report on the safety needs for AVs to signal their status and communicate their next intended actions using visual or audible signals or a combination of both.

41. GRE agreed to delete the agenda item on IWVTA and to include a new agenda item on international events in the field of automotive lighting of interest to GRE.

42. In compliance with Rule 37 of the Rules of Procedure (TRANS/WP.29/690 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/690/Amend.1), GRE called for the election of officers. The representatives of the contracting parties, present and voting, elected unanimously Mr. M. Loccufier (Belgium) as Chair and Mr. D. Rovers (Netherlands) as Vice-Chair for the sessions of GRE scheduled in the year 2019.

World Forum for the Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations | Session 176 | 12-16 Nov 2018

1. The World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29) held its 176th session from 13 to 16 November 2018, chaired by Mr. A. Erario (Italy). The following countries were represented, following Rule 1 of the Rules of Procedure of WP.29 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/690/Rev.1): Algeria, Australia, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Czechia, Egypt, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Hungary, India, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Morocco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Republic of Moldova, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunisia, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (United Kingdom), United States of America, Uruguay and Uzbekistan. Representatives of the European Union participated. The following international organization was represented: International Telecommunication Union (ITU). The following intergovernmental organization was represented: EuroMed Transport Support Project. The following non-governmental organizations were also represented: Association for Emissions Control by Catalyst (AECC), European Association of Automotive Suppliers (CLEPA/MEMA/JAPIA)1, Consumers International (CI), European Tyre and Rim Technical Organization (ETRTO), FIA Foundation for the Automobile and Society, Global New Car Assessment Programme (Global NCAP), International Automotive Lighting and Light Signalling Expert Group (GTB), International Motor Vehicle Inspection Committee (CITA), International Motorcycle Manufacturers Association (IMMA), International Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers (OICA), Recreation Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA) and World Blind Union (WBU). Other non-governmental organizations were represented following Rule 1(d): American Automotive Policy Council (AAPC), Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA) and World Bicycle Industry Association (WBIA). Other non-governmental organizations, private sector entities, independent experts and observers were represented: Motor and Equipment Manufacturers Association (MEMA), and U.S. Tire Manufacturers Association.

2. The Chair of the World Forum welcomed the representatives to the 176th session of World Forum and introduced the opening speakers: Mr. Yuwei Li, Director of the UNECE Sustainable Transport Division, Mr. Jean Todt, United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Road Safety and His Excellency Mr. Ulugbek Lapasov, Permanent Representative of Uzbekistan to the United Nations.

3. The Director, Mr. Li welcomed the participants to the World Forum. He underlined the magnitude of impact that the work of the World Forum has in implementing the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda, particularly, in the goals related to good health and well-being, climate change mitigation and sustainable urban development. He highlighted the link between the work on automated and autonomous vehicles with Sustainable Development Goals related to industrial development and innovation.es in intergroup collaboration.

4. The Director reminded participants that efforts in the international harmonization of vehicle regulations and the domestic application of United Nations vehicle regulations have been identified as key actions for achieving progress in vehicle safety. As a pillar of the United Nations Decade of Action for Road Safety, 2011-2020, this imparts towards meeting recommendations contained in numerous United Nations General Assembly resolutions, that were adopted in recent years and call for concerted global and domestic efforts to improve road safety.

5. Mr. Li recalled the establishment in 2018 of the United Nations Road Safety Trust Fund and its Global Framework Plan that targets the development of national road safety systems. He emphasized that vehicle regulations are an important component of national road safety systems, and that the World Forum’s work on developing and harmonizing vehicle regulations is indispensable for designing sound national road safety systems.

6. The Director commended the World Forum for being a pioneer in ECE when it opened its agreements for global membership and started providing global services. He underlined the goal of the Inland Transport Committee (ITC) in its 2030 strategy to open other agreements under its purview for global membership as part of the effort of the international community to improve the safety, efficiency and environmental performance of transport systems. He underlined that the ITC 2030 strategy is a platform through which the World Forum can expand its regional and global membership.

7. Mr. Li highlighted the potential of the World Forum to address challenges in the global road transport industry, particularly, the severe shortage of professional drivers. He stressed that this is a strain on the industry and negatively impacts economic development worldwide. He said that the activities on automated vehicles are considered as promising for tackling the challenges stemming from the shortage of professional drivers.

8. The Director further added that the World Forum’s activities in vehicle automation also may contribute to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals related to climate change, pollution and road safety by setting relevant and sound technical standards for road vehicles. He stressed the potential of automation to improve road safety but cautioned that automated vehicles may entail risks. He thus identified the most important role of the World Forum in ensuring road safety in the context of vehicle automation, namely assisting contracting parties and the industry, by developing regulations which ensure that automated vehicles realize their potential for positively contributing to road safety and simultaneously remedying risks carried by applications of vehicle automation technology.

9. In conclusion, Mr. Li called for continuing cooperation between Global Forum for Road Traffic Safety (WP.1) and WP.29 in developing technical standards and legal provisions for automated vehicles. Cooperation in vehicle automation would enable the development of technical standards for applicable technologies and their deployment on roads, and positively impact the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.

10. The Chair of the World Forum thanked the Director for his statement. He summarized the main activities of WP.29, especially the scope of work for improving vehicle safety and environmental performance, and the activities in vehicle automation, which require the dedicated attention of the World Forum. The Chair stressed the importance that the World Forum dedicates to activities directed at improving the safety and environmental performance of vehicles, as well as matters related to the developing field of vehicle automation. The Chair of WP.29 also echoed the position of the Director on the importance of cooperation between WP.1 and WP.29 in traffic rules and vehicle automation. He highlighted the results achieved thus far in the spirit of good cooperation between the two groups, i.e. the amendments to respective legal instruments that pave the way for further regulatory progress in vehicle automation. He also described the steps taken to secure continued positive cooperation, i.e. the establishment of the joint Executive Task Force for Vehicle Automation, the aim of which is, inter alia, to secure productive cooperation and positive solutions in the face of possible challenges in intergroup collaboration.

11. The United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Road Safety, Mr. Todt greeted the participants of the World Forum and expressed his gratitude for the opportunity to again address the World Forum. He praised the delegates and experts from all over the world for their work and continuing commitment to the safety and security of vehicles. He alerted delegates that statistics that are expected to be released by the World Health Organization in the coming months would not reflect a decrease in the number of road fatalities, as aimed for in the United Nations Decade of Action, 2010-2020, but rather an increase to 1.36 million lives lost each year. He stressed, in this context, that as the deadlines of the Decade and Goal 3.6, to halve the number of road fatalities and injuries by 2020, loom closer, the vehicle safety-related activities of WP.29 are becoming evermore essential.

12. The Special Envoy described his mission, to promote coordinated action towards improved road safety at global, regional and national levels, including accession to and implementation of the 1958, 1997, and 1998 Agreements as part of his core message to high-ranking government officials. He commended a number of actions in the work of the World Forum on improving road safety. The Special Envoy highlighted the proposed amendment to UN GTR No. 9 of the 1998 Agreement, which is on the agenda of the Executive Committee (AC.3), for increasing the effectiveness of pedestrian safety protection. He stressed that 270,000 pedestrians lose their lives on the world’s roads each year, accounting for 22 per cent of the total road traffic deaths. The Special Envoy underlined that this amendment was a step forward in making cars safer, with the ultimate aim that the most likely consequence of accidents, which UN GTR No. 9 aims to mitigate the impacts of, in the future, be limited to minor injuries. Moreover, he asserted that this amendment would provide further regulatory convergence that will result in improving trade.

13. The Special Envoy acclaimed the increased accession to United Nations legal instruments serviced by the World Forum by countries in Africa and Asia. He applauded the collaboration of WP.29 with his secretariat in their joint efforts in Latin America to facilitate subregional dialogue on improved vehicle safety, with consideration of the 1958, 1997 and 1998 Agreements and more specifically, Revision 3 of the 1958 Agreement. He also commended Uruguay for its leadership in that initiative. He cautioned nevertheless that Latin America remained largely unengaged and that it should be considered a priority region for promoting United Nations agreements on vehicle construction in the following two years, which could help address the major issue of poor vehicle safety in the region and consequently, the high levels of road casualties.

14. The Special Envoy stated that the challenge to reduce road traffic fatalities is growing alongside increasing motorization rates and the evolution of the automotive industry, and that support and commitment from the industry is very much needed to achieve milestones in improving road safety. He recalled informal document WP.29-170-28, prepared for the 170th session of WP.29, on consultations to establish an automotive industry voluntary commitment, which advocated for the voluntary commitment of manufacturers to minimum standards for vehicle safety. He called on the automotive industry to consider that approach because adopting minimum safety standards would mean that their consumers around the world would benefit from an internationally endorsed minimum level of vehicle safety. He stressed that such a commitment would be better in the long-term for business and would save lives on the road. He called on the industry to step up its efforts towards establishing such a voluntary commitment. The Special Envoy stressed that only by aligning the efforts of all stakeholders and through complementing each other’s activities can progress towards the shared responsibility of securing a safe and sustainable future be accelerated. He strongly expressed his commitment to continue working alongside ECE and other partners to internationally promote United Nations vehicle agreements.

15. In conclusion, the Special Envoy informed delegates about the recently established United Nations Road Safety Trust Fund, which aims to support government efforts to strengthen national road safety systems. He encouraged governments, international organizations, NGOs and the industry to support the fund.

16. The Chair of the World Forum thanked the Special Envoy for his participation in the session of the World Forum and for his intervention and expressed the gratitude of the World Forum for promoting its work and its vehicle agreements throughout the world.

17. The representative of the Republic of Korea, Vice-Chair of GRSP, expressed appreciation for the Special Envoy’s efforts in improving road safety at a global level. He described his country’s experience and road safety performance in the last 30 years, a period marked by rapid economic growth and motorization. In 1991, the number of traffic death reached 13,429, but then continuously decreased to 4,185 in 2017. The country’s road traffic death rate per 100,000 persons had decreased from 31 to 8.1, a 75 per cent reduction. He explained that the Republic of Korea had, since joining the 1958 and 1998 Agreements, improved many practices. One of the main factors behind the significant reduction in road traffic fatalities in the country during the preceding 20-year period was that UN Regulations and UN GTRs, such as frontal impact, side impact, pedestrian safety, Electronic Stability Control, and Advanced Emergency Braking System, had been applied since the Republic of Korea joined WP.29. He underlined that, given that the share of pedestrian fatalities in road traffic accidents was nearly 40 per cent, the Republic of Korea was the one of the first countries to introduce a pedestrian safety standard in December 2008, just after the establishment of UN GTR No. 9.

18. The representative of the Republic of Korea further informed delegates that his country had joined the United Nations Road Safety Trust Fund as a member of the Advisory Board and expressed his support for the Secretary General’s Special Envoy’s closing remark, inviting governments, organizations and industries to support the United Nations Road Safety Trust Fund.

19. The Special Envoy on Road Safety thanked the representative of the Republic for Korea for his statement and the information about his country’s improvement in road safety. He encouraged the Republic of Korea to share their positive experiences and practices that have led to a significant improvement in the country’s road safety performance for the benefit of countries in the region.

20. The representative of South Africa thanked Mr. Todt. He stated that South Africa aspired to adopt all other UN Regulations under the 1958 and 1998 Agreements that had not been adopted upon its accession to the agreements, and to ensure that the country comprehensively participates in activities of the World Forum and its subsidiary groups. He invited the Special Envoy to visit South Africa and to support a comprehensive application of the 1958 Agreement, which would also allow the country’s administration and industry to fully apply the E47 mark. He mentioned that the neighbouring countries, Botswana, Mozambique and Zimbabwe, could also benefit from becoming signatories to the United Nations vehicle agreements, and invited the Special Envoy and the World Forum to support them in the process.

21. The Special Envoy stated that South Africa had a key role in promoting United Nations vehicle regulations throughout the African continent, and shared information about ongoing contacts of his secretariat with the highest officials in the country to prepare his visit in 2019.

22. The Permanent Representative of Uzbekistan to the United Nations, H.E. Mr. Lapasov thanked the ECE Sustainable Transport Division for assisting Uzbekistan in acceding to the 1998 Agreement. He reaffirmed the willingness of Uzbekistan to work with all interested parties towards the successful implementation of the objectives set out in the agreement, and especially to establish a global process for developing UN GTRs on safety, environmental, energy efficiency and anti-theft performance of wheeled vehicles, equipment and parts. He informed the World Forum that the Uzbek Agency for Standardization is the contact point for issues related to the agreement. H.E. Mr. Lapasov invited countries that are not yet contracting parties to the agreement to accede. Moreover, he expressed gratitude to the Special Envoy for the work done and admiration for the achievements of the secretariat of the Special Envoy during its mandate. His Excellency stressed that an enormous amount of work has yet to be done in improving global road safety and stated that Uzbekistan will work with the secretariat of the Special Envoy and other relevant stakeholders towards these goals. His Excellency concluded by extending an invitation from his Government to the Special Envoy to visit Uzbekistan.

23. The Special Envoy thanked His Excellency and took due note of the invitation.

24. The Chair of the World Forum thanked the representative of Uzbekistan for his statement.

25. The representative of Global NCAP expressed appreciation for the support and efforts of FIA and the ECE secretariat to help and support the work of his organization. He also appreciated the leadership to achieve a voluntary industry commitment. Moreover, he expressed hope that a commitment would include front and side impact occupant protection (UN Regulations Nos. 94 and 95), Pedestrian Protection (UN Regulation No. 127 and UN GTR No. 9) and Electronic Stability Control (UN Regulation No. 140 and UN GTR No. 8) provisions.

26. The Special Envoy thanked the representative of Global NCAP, supported his comments about the need to work with automotive manufacturers, and to advocate for their voluntary commitment to safety standards concerning equipment in vehicles, especially in the countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America where road safety performance is unsustainable. He urged government representatives at the World Forum to implement more stringent standards for vehicles, and for their engagement and support in advocacy efforts to secure the voluntary commitment of automotive manufacturers to safety standards.

27. The representative of OICA stated that a voluntary commitment would be difficult to achieve due to reasons of competition and economy. He stressed that manufacturers focus on mandatory national requirements for the construction of vehicles. The representative mentioned discussions on the possibility of developing a United Nations resolution on establishing mandatory national requirements in countries that have not enacted such legislation. He emphasized the readiness of the industry to support a process of establishing national mandatory requirements, provide input and to develop a clear roadmap of requirements that should be put in place.

28. The Special Envoy reiterated his position that it is the responsibility of the industry to produce and sell vehicles in accordance with minimum safety standards, and that existing discrepancies in the safety equipment in vehicles sold in Europe or in the United States of America with the same vehicle models of the same manufacturers sold in Africa, Asia or Latin America are unacceptable.

29. The Chair of the World Forum concluded the opening session by recalling the recent revision of the 1958 Agreement. The revision allows flexibility for the contracting parties in applying regulations under this agreement without mandating application of the latest series of amendments: initial access would be to a minimum level of stringency in safety and emission standards — a level that corresponds to the circumstances of a contracting party — while providing the possibility for subsequently increasing stringency towards the state of the art.

30. The annotated provisional agenda was adopted.

31. The list of informal documents is reproduced in Annex I to the session report.

33. AC.2 discussed the draft programme of work (ECE/TRANS/2018/1/Rev.2), with special focus on the recently established GRVA. AC.2 highlighted the need for a more strategic approach on how priorities are being defined for the work under the 1958 Agreement and the 1998 Agreement. For this, input should be sought from the GR Chairs and Vice-Chairs. This would require discussions at the GR level on the priorities of the activities within the groups.

34. In view of the coordination of the work of GRs on automated vehicles, AC.2 recommended that regular meetings of GR Chairs and Vice-Chairs were convened, notably during the weeks of the three WP.29 meetings each year.

35. AC.2 reviewed a proposal from the Chair of GRVA to cluster the activities on automation into the following groups: (a) data management, (b) functional requirements, (c) visualisation systems and (d) vehicle safety assessment. AC.2 noted the proposal but decided that this issue should be discussed by WP.29 as part of the broader discussion on priorities for GRVA under item 2.3. of the agenda (see WP.29-176-28).

36. AC.2 reviewed and adopted the provisional agenda of the 176th session of the World Forum and reviewed the draft agenda of the 177th session of the World Forum, scheduled to be held in Geneva from 12 to 15 March 2019.

37. A part of the work of the former IWG on ITS/AD had been taken over by the newly established GRVA. AC.2 recommended that the activities of the former IWG that had not been integrated into GRVA were continued, i.e. to provide an inclusive platform for exchange and cooperation on intelligent transport systems with other international organization such as the ITU, the International Road Federation (IRF) and ITS bodies.

38. AC.2 agreed that the IWG on ITS would not convene during the week of the 176th session of WP.29. Instead, AC.2 recommended WP.29 delegates to attend the ITS flagship event on 4 December 2018 and the Future Networked Car event, planned to take place on 7 March 2019, during the Geneva Motor Show.

39. AC.2 noted that the coordination between WP.1 and WP.29, as requested in Decision No.13 of the eightieth session of the Inland Transport Committee (ITC), had materialized by the setting up of a WP.1-WP.29 Executive Task Force (ETF). Inter alia, ETF is preparing a joint WP.1-WP.29 event on the occasion of the eighty-first session of ITC, on 18 February 2019.

40. AC.2 welcomed the work done by the Task Force on Cyber Security/Over-the-Air software updates and recommended extending its mandate.

41. AC.2 recommended postponing the vote on the amendment proposals under agenda items 4.6.4 and 4.6.5 and to keep those as pending proposals in the WP.29 agenda, awaiting amendments to UN Regulation No. 78.

42. AC.2 recommended postponing the vote on proposed amendments under agenda items 4.6.9 to 4.6.37 and deferred their consideration as revised proposals to the March 2019 session of WP.29.

43. AC.2 recommended postponing the vote on proposed new UN Regulations under agenda items 4.12.1 – 4.12.3 and deferred their consideration as revised proposals to the March 2019 session of WP.29.

44. AC.2 reviewed the proposed calendar of meetings for 2019.

32. The 128th session of WP.29/AC.2 (12 November 2018) was chaired by Mr. A. Erario (Italy) and was attended, in accordance to Rule 29 of the terms of reference and rules of procedure of WP.29 (TRANS/WP.29/690/Rev.1) by the Chairs of GRBP (France), GRE (Belgium), GRPE (Netherlands), GRVA (United Kingdom), GRSG (Italy), the Vice-Chair of GRSP (Republic of Korea), the Chair of the Executive Committee (AC.3) of the 1998 Agreement (Japan), the Vice-Chair of WP.29 (Russian Federation), and by the representatives of Canada, Germany, United States of America and European Union.

45. The Secretary of WP.29 presented the programme of work with a strategic introduction on the main priorities of the WP.29 work, which are related to vehicle automation and environmental protection. He stated that the areas of work of the six GRs were of equal importance. He introduced Real Driving Emissions (RDE) as a new area of work under the GRPE. The priorities would include further development in implementing the 1958, 1997 and 1998 Agreements, the main horizontal activities and the main topics addressed by the subsidiary bodies of WP.29 following the transformation of GRRF into GRVA. He further explained that the part of the document with tables for each of the bodies was needed as a legacy document providing for the mandates for internal administrative activities (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/1/Rev.2).

46. The representative of the European Union recalled the need for a more strategic approach in defining the future programmes of work under the 1958 Agreement, the 1997 Agreement and the 1998 Agreement, and called upon GR Chairs to identify their priorities as a basis for future updates of the programme of work.

47. WP.29 adopted the revised programme of work based on document ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/1/Rev.2.

48. The World Forum considered and adopted the amendments to the Rules of Procedures of WP.29 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/166).

49. The World Forum took note of the list of Working Parties and Chairs (WP.29-176-01) and the draft 2019 calendar for WP.29 and its subsidiary bodies (WP.29-176-02).

50. The 2019 calendar and the list of Working Parties, Informal Working Groups (IWG) and Chairs are reproduced in Annexes II and III to the session report.

51. The Chair of GRVA introduced WP.29-176-28 which sets out the priority areas on which GRVA should focus. He explained that the document was based on WP.29-175-29 submitted jointly by Japan and the European Union. He reminded the World Forum of his consultation with the WP.29 delegations and explained that document WP.29-176-28 was an attempt to summarize the responses into strategic issues. He described several detailed topics such as cyber security and automated steering where discussions were well advanced but also mentioned ongoing discussions on the functional requirements of automated vehicles and consideration of a new approach to assessing their performance. He invited delegates to provide comments on his proposed list by mid-December 2018.

52. The representative of the Netherlands noted that WP.29-176-28 did not provide a general framework but that it specifically addressed GRVA activities. The Chair of WP.29 confirmed that the framework does indeed contain activities beyond those of GRVA.

53. The representative of CLEPA presented WP.29-176-24. He expressed full support to the new structure and encouraged WP.29 to effectively discuss the organization of automated vehicle related work. He stressed the need to complete the work of the IWG on Automatically Commanded Steering Function (ACSF).

54. The representative of the Russian Federation, Co-Chair of the IWG on Periodic Technical Inspection (PTI), proposed to note that work items related to requirements for automated vehicles in use, including PTI are important. The Chair confirmed that WP.29 considered this work as important and noted the activities, e.g. in IWG PTI.

55. The representative of ITU stated the need to consider the interaction of conventional vehicles with automated vehicles in traffic. The Chair of GRVA confirmed that GRVA was already considering it.

56. The representatives of Japan, the United States of America and the European Union thanked the Chair of GRVA for his proposal. They considered the general approach was appropriate, but advised that the World Forum should return to this issue in March 2019 once GRVA had considered this item again at its second session in January 2019. The delegate from China explained that he could not formally confirm his Government’s support for the proposals but would consult his experts. He sought clarification on how he could contribute before the December deadline. WP.29 welcomed a proposal from the secretariat to collate delegation’s contributions provided they are received by Friday 15 December 2018 (send to francois.guichard@un.org). Thereafter, as proposed by the GRVA Chair, a videoconference would be held before the end of 2018, involving those delegation which had contributed written comments. WP.29 noted that the objective was to prepare a document for consideration at WP.29 and at AC.3 in March 2019 following review by GRVA at its second session.

57. The representative of China presented the position of his country on the organization and future work planning of GRVA reflected in WP.29-176-30, which was well received by WP.29.

58. The representative from Japan introduced WP.29-176-29 presenting Japan’s position on how to consider innovative validation method for safety of automated vehicle. He presented the outline of the Japanese guideline for safety technology for automated vehicles as well as considerations on how the safety evaluation should be discussed at GRVA. WP.29 noted with interest this presentation.

59. The representative of the World Blind Union stated the importance of the work on driverless vehicles as it could change the lives of millions of visually impaired persons. He mentioned the potential of these products: these vehicles could open new transport options and increase employment, education, or conditions of living of blind persons, etc. He highlighted the possible activities that would address the needs of the vision impaired community: appropriate human machine interface for interactions, including in case of emergency situations, or in case of events outside of the vehicle causing the vehicle to stop. He mentioned that, as these vehicles would likely park themselves, a means of helping to find the vehicles would be necessary. WP.29 noted the importance of considering these aspects in due time due to the huge potential for increasing individual mobility for impaired people.

60. The representative of the United Kingdom, Co-Chair of the IWG on ITS, recalled the outcome of the discussion at AC.2. WP.29 supported his proposal to prepare terms of reference for consideration at the March 2019 session of WP.29. He mentioned the activities of the UNECE secretariat together with the International Road Federation (IRF) and separately with the ITU on the preparation of the UNECE-IRF event on 4 December 2018 and the UNECE-ITU Future Networked Car event on 7 March 2019. WP.29 accepted his volunteering to coordinate the activities of WP.29 and to propose a WP.29 delegation at both events. He indicated the he would seek participation from all CPs, and thanked India and the United States of America for their interest in these activities.

61. Due to lack of time, WP.29 could not review documents WP.29-176-16 and WP.29-176-17. The representative of OICA proposed that the documents are reviewed at the next session of GRVA.

62. The World Forum recalled the report of the Chair of GRE on its seventy-ninth session (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/79) and approved the report.

63. The World Forum recalled the report of the Chair of GRSG on its 114th session (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRSG/93) and approved the report.

64. The World Forum recalled the report of the Chair of GRSP on its sixty-third session (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRSP/63) and approved the report.

65. The World Forum recalled the report of the Chair of GRPE on its seventy-seventh session (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/77) and approved the report.

66. The GRBP Chair reported on the results achieved by GRBP during its sixty-eighth session (for details, see the report of the session ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRB/66).

67. In particular, the GRBP Chair mentioned that GRBP had adopted new series of amendments to UN Regulations Nos. 9 (Noise of three-wheeled vehicles) and 92 (Replacement exhaust silencing systems for motorcycles).

68. The GRBP Chair also requested WP.29 to extend the mandates of IWG on ASEP until September 2020 and of IWG on QRTV GTR until December 2019. WP.29 agreed.

69. The GRBP Chair also sought the views of WP.29 on the scope of a new draft resolution on road surface labelling. WP.29 encouraged GRBP to consult the road construction industry, to continue work on this, and to report back to WP.29 in due course. WP.29 noted that, at this stage, it would be premature to anticipate the eventual legal form of this resolution which, for example, could be kept as a reference document.

70. WP.29 noted that GRBP had re-elected Mr. S. Ficheux (France) as Chair and Mr. A. Bocharov (Russian Federation) as Vice-Chair for the year 2019.

71. The Chair of GRVA, Mr. B. Frost (United Kingdom) reported to WP.29 on the results of its first session (for more details see the report of the session ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRVA/1).

72. WP.29 noted the readiness of GRVA to work on items related to active safety, Advanced Driver Assistant Systems (ADAS), automation and connectivity. The Chair of GRVA referred to the discussions under agenda item 2.3.

73. WP.29 invited GRVA to envisage follow-up activities for the Task Force on Cyber Security and Over-the-Air issues, and to present them at the March 2019 session of WP.29.

74. WP.29 agreed to extend the mandate of the IWG on Advanced Emergency Braking Systems (AEBS) by one year, until September 2019.

75. WP.29 noted the election of Mr. Frost as Chair for the GRVA session in 2019. WP.29 agreed that GRVA would proceed with the election of Vice-Chair(s) in January 2019.

76. The GRSG Chair reported on the results achieved during the 115th session of GRSG (for more details see the report of the session ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRSG/94). He said that GRSG had adopted amendments to 11 UN Regulations as well as a new draft UN Regulation on Blind Spot Information Systems (BSIS). The new Regulation and these amendments will be submitted to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their March 2019 sessions.

77. GRSG questioned the need for an ambassador on the International Whole Vehicle Type Approval (IWVTA) and preferred to nominate a new GRSG ambassador on vehicle automation to ensure, in future, a good exchange of views and coordination under this new agenda item.

78. The Chair of GRE reported on the results of the eightieth session of GRE (for details, see the report ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/80).

79. The GRE Chair briefed WP.29 about corrections to the extensive package of amendment proposals in the framework of Simplification of Lighting and light-signalling Regulations (SLR) that had been submitted to WP.29 and AC.1 in August 2018. In this context, WP.29 recalled the recommendation of AC.2 to consolidate the SLR package and to postpone its adoption to the March 2019 session (see paras. 42-43 above).

80. The Chair of GRE pointed out that now the GRE Informal Working Group on “Simplification of the Lighting and Light-Signalling UN Regulations” (IWG SLR) would start the second stage which would focus on introducing technology-neutral and performance-based requirements and that, to this end, GRE had revised the Terms of Reference of IWG on SLR. He sought the consent of WP.29 to extend the mandate of IWG on SLR until the end of 2022. WP.29 agreed to this request.

81. WP.29 noted that GRE considered and adopted a set of amendment proposals on the use of LED substitute light sources for light-signalling applications and would continue considering LED substitutes for front-lighting applications. WP.29 was also informed that GRE had adopted new series of amendments to UN Regulations Nos. 10 (Electromagnetic compatibility) and 53 (Installation of lighting and light-signalling devices for L3 vehicles).

82. The Chair of GRE added that GRE had established a task force to evaluate the need for signalling requirements for automated/autonomous vehicles to signal their status and communicate their next intended actions using visual or audible signals or a combination of both. He committed himself to keep the World Forum informed about this work.

83. WP.29 noted that GRE had re-elected Mr. M. Loccufier (Belgium) as Chair and Mr. D. Rovers (Netherlands) as Vice-Chair for the year 2019.

84. The secretariat informed the World Forum about the latest update of the status of the 1958 Agreement, based on ECE/TRANS/WP.29/343/Rev.26, as corrected, that contains the information received by the secretariat up to 20 October 2018, available on the WP.29 website. WP.29 noted that contracting parties should notify the secretariat about any amendments needed to the status document via the new established online database only.

85. WP.29 noted the introduction of a new layout for the ECE/TRANS/WP.29/343/Rev.26 document. Only Part II and Annexes II and III would be issued for the June and November sessions. Part I and Annex I were accessible online via a website application. The full document would be issued at each March session.

86. The secretariat reported on the development of an extension for information on applications of former versions of UN Regulations by contracting parties of the web-based application on the exchange of information on nominated Technical Services and Type Approval Authorities.

87. The expert from IMMA welcomed the development of this application and asked whether it could be extended to provide information on the minimum level of stringency applicable in the territory of the contracting parties.

88. The secretariat confirmed that the extension under development was aimed to provide information relevant for limited IWVTA (L-IWVTA) and hoped that it could be available online by the end of 2018.

89. No information was provided under this agenda item.

90. WP.29 welcomed the publication of ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1044/Rev.2 on general guidelines for regulatory procedures and transitional provisions in UN Regulations.

91. The representative of OICA introduced WP.29-176-25, and referred to the discussion of WP.29 at its previous session on the difficulties for obtaining extensions to existing type approvals. He recalled the decision of WP.29 to grant a transitional provision to a number of UN Regulations (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1139, paras. 64-65). He explained that some GRs had already drafted amendments to insert the new transitional provision covering the period until the date of 31 December 2019. He concluded that such amendments were not necessary as they are covered by the decision of WP.29 and that these amendments were unlikely to enter into force by the end of 2019.

92. WP.29 confirmed this interpretation and that amendment proposals prepared by GRSG for introducing those transitional provisions would not need to be put forward for adoption by WP.29. On this occasion, WP.29 recalled that as of 1.1.2020, the new guidelines under Revision 3 of the 1958 Agreement must be applied to all UN Regulations.

93. The representative of Japan, Chair of the IWG on IWVTA, reported on the progress at the twenty-eighth meeting of the IWG on IWVTA held in Geneva in November 2018 (WP.29-176-19). He highlighted the submission of ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/82 containing the draft 01 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 0. He introduced WP.29-176-20 on a proposed roadmap for IWVTA Phase 2 (2018-2022) and WP.29-176-21, proposing candidate items for technical regulations applicable to that phase. The World Forum endorsed the roadmap and requested the secretariat to circulate WP.29-176-21 to all GRs for prioritization of the candidate items and report back to the IWG on IWVTA.

94. The World Forum agreed to resume consideration and possible vote in AC.1 of ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/82 at the forthcoming session in March 2019.

95. The representative of Japan, Chair of the IWG on IWVTA, informed WP.29 about the proposed amendments to Schedule 4 on the numbering of UN type approvals allowing the use of a four to six-digit sequential number (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/165). He reported on the recommendation of the group that GRVA should resume consideration of the proposals to align the provisions on approval numbering in UN Regulation No. 90. He introduced WP.29-176-22 proposing to insert in ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2017/131 a new question and answer entry clarifying how the new approval number format should be reflected in the communication form with regard to the extension number. WP.29 endorsed the proposal and requested the secretariat to circulate WP.29-176-22 as ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2017/131/Add.1.

96. The World Forum agreed to resume consideration of ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/165 at its next session in March 2019.

97. The representative of the European Union, on behalf of the Chair of the IWG on DETA, presented informal document WP.29-176-23. He mentioned that the expert from CITA offered to fund the development of the Declaration of Conformance (DoC) functionality in DETA as it may offer a platform for exchanging information about permissible vehicle software (including version numbers and integrity validation data) for various use cases and stakeholders including PTI and also for providing type approval information for the benefit of the PTI process as stated in WP.29-176-18.

98. The representative of OICA stated the highly confidential nature of documents stored in DETA and highlighted the need to create access rights that would respect their intellectual property and confidentiality. He proposed that WP.29 clarify who would be able to access the documents in DETA. The representative of Germany offered that IWG on DETA explore the possibility to organize a WebEx meeting to work on this issue and proposed that only type approval authorities should have access to the DETA, in a first stage.

99. The representative of France sought clarification whether the starting date for the use of DETA in its productive phase is meant to have an optional or mandatory nature.

100. The representative of Tunisia highlighted the importance to have secured and reliable access to trustworthy type approval documentation in the shortest time frame possible to allow the verification of authenticity of type approval documentation.

101. The representative of Spain requested further information on the status of the availability of a manual detailing the protocol to access and use DETA.

102. The representative from EuroMed mentioned that access to DETA was critical for all EuroMed countries and requested information on the ways to access to DETA.

103. The representative of Global NCAP explained, as an example, that South American countries envisaged applying United Nations regulations as an interim measure until they potentially accede to the 1958, 1997 and 1998 Agreements. He stated that these countries, not yet contracting party to the agreements would need access to DETA and that it might accelerate the adhesion process.

104. The secretariat invited the heads of delegations to provide the secretariat with the Single Point Of Contact (SPOC) on the designation of type approval authorities and technical services that would receive credentials for accessing the application for introducing new or changes to existing information.

105. The representative from CITA introduced a proposal for a next evolution of DETA by presenting WP.29-176-18 on individual vehicle specific information on permissible vehicle software. This would support the process of Periodic Technical Inspection (PTI) of modern vehicles, which is an important factor for road safety.

106. CITA confirmed its financial contribution for the development of the Document of Conformity (DoC) module of DETA without any preconditions.

107. The representative of the United Kingdom expressed, in principal, his agreement to the availability of software information (RxSWIN) for the purpose of PTI, nevertheless, questions on confidentiality and data security need to be solved first.

108. The representative of OICA recalled ongoing work in the Task Force on Cyber security, where software information is handled as software identifier RxSWIN, and introduced as part of the type approval certificate.

108 bis. The representative from the Netherlands supported this. The WP.29 Chair expressed the need for coordination between the Task Force on Cyber Security and the IWG on DETA on this issue.

109. Addressed by the WP.29 Chair on financial contributions to the further development of DATA for the module of the Unique Identifier (UI):

  1. CLEPA stated that a budget had been reserved and awaited the outcome of Executive Committee (EXCOM) discussions on the ECE budget proposal, an anticipated funding was envisaged for 2019;
  2. ETRTO confirmed its commitment to contribute to funding UI; and
  3. OICA reiterated their willingness to contribute to developing UI, if CLEPA, ETRTO and other stakeholders would do so.

110. The World Forum considered the draft amendments under agenda items 4.6.1 to 4.6.3 and 4.6.6 to 4.6.8 and recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting.

111. For the amendment proposals under agenda items 4.6.9 – 4.6.37, WP.29 agreed with the view of AC.2 (see para. 42 above) and recommended postponing the vote and deferring their consideration to the March 2019 session of AC.1.

112. WP.29 recalled the recommendation of AC.2 not to vote on the amendment proposals to UN Regulation No. 53 under agenda items 4.6.4 and 4.6.5 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/86 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/87), and to keep those items as pending proposals awaiting amendments to UN Regulation No. 78. The representative of IMMA pointed out that, apart from amendments on stop lamps which required corresponding modifications to UN Regulation No. 78, the amendment proposals UN Regulation No. 53 also contained corrections of errors. He proposed to extract those corrections from ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/86 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/87 and to submit them for consideration to the March 2019 sessions of WP.29 and AC.1. WP.29 supported IMMA and requested the secretariat to revise the documents accordingly.

113. The World Forum considered the draft amendments under agenda items 4.7.1 to 4.7.3 and recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting.

114. The Chair of GRSG presented proposals on ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/123 to ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/126 under agenda items 4.7.4 to 4.7.7, to amend UN Regulations Nos. 46, 67, 105 and 110. The World Forum recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting.

115. The representative of OICA presented document WP.29-176-03, containing a proposed correction to ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/134.

116. The World Forum considered the draft amendments under agenda items 4.8.1 to 4.8.14 and recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting, subject to the following corrections:

In ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/134, page 2, for “4 December 2010” read “4 December 2012.”

117. The representative of the United States of America presented proposals on ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/141 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/142 under agenda items 4.8.15 and 4.7.16, to amend UN Regulations Nos. 16 and 17. The World Forum recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting.

118. The World Forum considered the draft amendments under items 4.9.1 to 4.9.9 and recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting, subject to the following corrections:

In ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/147, paragraph 14.3., amend to read:
“14.3. Alternative procedure …
The road load coefficients to be used shall be those for vehicle low (VL). If VL does not exist then the VH road load shall be used. VL and VH are defined in point 4.2.1.1.2. of Annex 4 of Amendment 4 to UN GTR No. 15. The dynamometer…”

In ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/148, paragraph 14.3., amend to read:
“14.3. Alternative procedure …
The road load coefficients to be used shall be those for vehicle low (VL). If VL does not exist then the VH road load shall be used. VL and VH are defined in point 4.2.1.1.2. of Annex 4 of Amendment 4 to UN GTR No. 15. The dynamometer…”

In ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/148, Appendix 6, paragraph 1., for “Annex” read “Appendix”.

119. The World Forum considered the draft corrigenda under items 4.10.1 to 4.10.5 and recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting.

120. WP.29 noted that no document had been submitted under this item.

121. The World Forum considered the proposals for new UN Regulations on Light Signalling Devices (LSD), on Road Illumination Devices (RID) and on Retro-Reflective Devices under items 4.12.1 to 4.12.3. The World Forum agreed with the view of AC.2 (see para. 43 above) and recommended postponing the vote and deferring their consideration to the March 2019 session of AC.1.

123. The World Forum agreed that agenda items 5.2 to 5.5 should be considered in detail by the Executive Committee of the 1998 Agreement (AC.3) under agenda item 13.

124. The World Forum agreed to keep this item on its agenda awaiting additional presentations.

125. WP.29 noted the consolidated document (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1074/Rev.11) on the status of the agreement, including the status of the UN Rules annexed to the agreement, the list of the Contracting Parties (CP) to the agreement and of their administrative departments. WP.29 took note that Nigeria had acceded to the 1997 Agreement.

126. The CPs were reminded to notify the secretariat of any relevant update.

125. WP.29 noted the consolidated document (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1074/Rev.11) on the status of the agreement, including the status of the UN Rules annexed to the agreement, the list of the Contracting Parties (CP) to the agreement and of their administrative departments. WP.29 took note that Nigeria had acceded to the 1997 Agreement.

126. The CPs were reminded to notify the secretariat of any relevant update.

127. The representative of the Russian Federation, Co-Chair of the IWG on PTI, updated the World Forum on the work of the group. He reported to the World Forum that the document review had been completed by the Government of the Russian Federation. The document was currently being processed by appropriate services at the United Nations Headquarters in New York. The representative of the Russian Federation stated that the official notification on the approval and entry into force of the documents would be provided to the World Forum shortly.

128. No proposals for amendments or updates to UN Rules Nos. 1 and 2 were submitted under this agenda item.

129. The Chair of WP.29 recalled the presentation at the 173rd WP.29 session by the representative of the Russian Federation, Co-Chair of the IWG on PTI, of ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2017/135 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/70 that propose the establishment of a new Rule on PTI of motor vehicles with electric and hybrid-electric propulsion systems and a new Rule on PTI of motor vehicles using Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) and/or Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) in their propulsion system that would be annexed to the 1997 Agreement.

130. He recalled that WP.29 had recommended the submission of the two proposals to AC.4 for voting.

131. The representative of the Russian Federation, Co-Chair of the IWG on PTI, updated the World Forum on the work of the group. He recalled that the Terms of Reference of the IWG on PTI had been adopted at the 175th session of WP.29 in June 2018. The IWG on PTI had not convened since. He announced that the IWG on PTI would meet on 15 November 2018 at 2.30 p.m. and invited interested delegates to attend. He informed the World Forum that discussion items would include PTI of highly automated and autonomous vehicles, the draft guidelines on road side inspection, addressing issues related to unauthorised modifications in vehicles, as well as other components of the Terms of References.

132. The representative of the Russian Federation reported on the efforts of the Russian Government to eradicate the sale of falsified parts on the market, including falsification based on fake approval communications. He highlighted cases of missing feedback by administrative bodies of contracting parties to the 1958 Agreement to requests of their Russian counterparts, particularly from the Dutch (Rijksdienst voor het Wegverkeer, RDW) and the Irish (National Standard Authority of Ireland) bodies. He drew attention to Article 5 of the 1958 Agreement, stipulating the rules on the exchange of type approval documentation.

133. The Chair of the World Forum thanked the representative of the Russian Federation for providing an update on the actions taken to prevent the circulation of non-compliant vehicle equipment and parts. He stated that the World Forum had taken note of the situation with the unrequited request for information described by the representative of the Russian Federation, emphasizing the importance of international cooperation and information sharing to eradicate non-compliant vehicle parts and equipment.

134. The Secretary of WP.1 informed WP.29 about activities of mutual interest for the WPs. He provided information on the progress in harmonizing lighting provisions in the 1968 Vienna Convention and the UN Regulations on lighting annexed to the 1958 agreement, stating that relevant amendment proposals would be ready for adoption by the March or September 2019 sessions of WP.1.

135. The representative of the WP.1 informed the World Forum about the adoption of the “Global Forum on Road Traffic Safety (WP.1) Resolution on the deployment of highly and fully automated vehicles in road traffic” (ECE/TRANS/WP.1/2018/4/Rev.1).

136. The Secretary of WP.1 further informed WP.29 about two papers that are expected to be completed and presented at the March 2019 session of WP.1, providing advancement on:

  1. Issues dealing with situations when the driver operates the vehicle from outside;
  2. Activities other than driving, in automated vehicles of level three and higher.

137. He recommended WP.29 to consult WP.1 informal document No. 9 (2018) submitted by the European Transport Safety Council, titled “Literature Review on the Impact of Task Activity on Takeover from Automated Driving”.
138. He further informed WP.29 that the Secretary of WP.1 recognized the need for additional amendments to the 1968 Convention related to the use of highly automated vehicles.
139. He informed WP.29 that WP.1 had celebrated the 50-year anniversary of the 1968 Agreement on 8 November 2018.

140. He mentioned the activities of ECE related to the United Nations Trust Fund on Road Safety, that $15 million had been contributed thus far, and invited delegations and stakeholders that would wish to make contribution to the fund to contact him or the Director of the Sustainable Transport Division.

141. The representative of Finland, as the Ambassador of WP.29 to WP.1 recommended that WP.29 review the WP.1 resolution to avoid inconsistencies between WP.1 work and WP.29 activities. He explained that he would no longer attend WP.29 or WP.1 for the time being and that WP.29 may wish to consider a successor.

142. The World Forum thanked and commended Mr. E. Asplund for his dedicated work.

143. The WP.1 secretary invited members of the World Forum to actively participate in the joint WP.1-WP.29 event on 18 February 2019 (see para. 39 above)

144. No proposals for amendments or updates were submitted under this agenda item.

145. No proposals were submitted under this agenda item.

146. The secretariat reported on actions taken in the framework of the responsibilities of the World Forum on the third pillar “Safer vehicles” (WP.29-176-06).

147. The secretariat presented WP.29-176-13 introducing the objective and draft content of the proposed publication on "Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA) of Applying United Nations Vehicle Regulations for Road Safety ".

148. The representative of Malaysia expressed support for the initiative of the secretariat to develop the publication. The representative offered to share the Malaysia Automotive Institute’s experience and to prepare CBA reports as support to this activity of the secretariat.

149. The World Forum supported this activity of the secretariat as a useful tool to develop future regulatory initiatives in the framework of the three agreements under the purview of WP.29 and invited interested parties to assist the secretariat in this endeavour.

150. WP.29 welcomed the revised draft of the “Blue Book” prepared by the secretariat (WP.29-176-07). WP.29 noted some comments to and general support of the document. The secretariat was requested to insert the decisions of WP.29 reached during the week (mainly those related to the 1997 Agreement) and to go forward with the publication of the fourth edition of the “Blue Book” in the six official languages of the United Nations (Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish).

151. The representatives of EuroMed introduced the latest updates on the EU-funded project involving five North African countries (WP.29-176-32): Algeria, Egypt, Libya (currently inactive), Morocco and Tunisia and five Middle East countries: Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, State of Palestine, and Syrian Arab Republic (currently inactive). The project had already been introduced at the November 2017 session of WP.29 (WP.29-173-24 and WP.29-173-25). The project had been recently extended until 2022.

152. The EuroMed project had identified thirteen agreements, including the three vehicle agreements administered by WP.29 on which the work is focusing on. The resulting accessions to the UN agreements are progressing slowly, as administrative reform in the project countries is time consuming.

153. The EuroMed representative highlighted the added value of collaboration with OICA and CITA and was looking forward to a strengthened collaboration with IMMA.

154. IMMA expressed support for the initiative and was looking forward to a closer collaboration with the EuroMed project.

155. The EuroMed representative reported on the implantation progress of the 1958 and 1997 agreements, objects of the work held in the region, and highlighted the collaborations between technical services in Europe and in the EuroMed countries. The representatives of Morocco, Israel, Jordan, Algeria, Tunisia and the State of Palestine (statement delivered by the representative of EuroMed) presented their national situation on vehicle certification and PTI (Informal Documents WP.29-176-33 to 38).

156. The representative of EuroMed presented the draft Road Maps on the accession to and implementation of the United Nations 1958 and 1997 Agreements (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/163).

157. The representative of USA noted that the 1998 Agreement is lacking in the EuroMed report that is focusing mainly on the implementation of the 1958 and 1997 Agreements. He wondered if information on the 1998 Agreement could also be added to the EuroMed report.

158. The Secretary of WP.29 emphasized that all three vehicle agreements were treated on an equal footing in the World Forum and that roadmaps to accede the three agreements have been prepared by the EuroMed team and the secretariat (WP.29-176-08 and WP.29-176-26). The secretariat then presented document WP.29-176-13, the draft Road Map for accession to and implementation of the United Nations 1998 Agreement, which could become an integral part of the Road Maps publication.

159. The representative of EuroMed confirmed that their scope of work only included the 1958 and 1997 Agreements and that they would seek consent for including information on acceding to the 1998 Agreement (WP.29-176-13) in their Road Maps publication from the responsible department of the European Commission.

160. WP.29 welcomed a complete Road Maps publication, covering all three agreements.

161. The representative of CITA thanked EuroMed for the activities held in the region and for the example that such project represents for other countries in the world.

162. The Chair of WP.29 was pleased with the project outcomes and praised such initiatives as best practice examples that could be replicated in other developing regions.

163. The representative of Global NCAP presented Informal Document WP.29-176-39 highlighting the unsatisfactory results of crash tests of certain vehicle models sold in South Africa.

164. The representative of South Africa pointed at the fact that the vehicle model showing poor crash performance was one of a different vehicle category, not subject to frontal impacts regulatory requirements.

165. In accordance with the terms of reference and the rules of procedure, the World Forum elected Mr. B. Kisulenko (Russian Federation) as Chair and Mr. A. Erario (Italy) as Vice-Chair for the year 2019.

166. The representative of OICA informed the World Forum about the challenges of representatives of their organization to participate in the work of IWGs due to meeting-room size constraints at venues other than the Palais de Nations.

167. The secretary of WP.29 highlighted that participation in WP.29, its subsidiary bodies and in IWGs should be inclusive and IWGs should follow their Terms of References and Rules of Procedures. He welcomed the proposal to host meetings of IWGs in Geneva, subject to availability of rooms. He noted that the Conference Services requested lead time for their planning of meeting room allocation and meeting room availability would be limited due to construction works at the Palais.

168. Learning that Mr. L. Kincl (Czechia), Mr. E. Asplund (Finland) and Mr. P. Troppmann (European Commission) would no longer attend the sessions of WP.29, the World Forum acknowledged their continued support and highly valuable contributions during the years of their participation in WP.29 and wished them all the best in their future activities.

169. The World Forum adopted the report on its 176th session and its annexes based on a draft prepared by the secretariat. The report included sections related to the seventieth session of the Administrative Committee (AC.1) of the 1958 Agreement, to the fifty-fourth session of the Executive Committee (AC.3) of the 1998 Agreement and to the eleventh session of the Administrative Committee (AC.4) of the 1997 Agreement.

170. Of the 55 contracting parties to the agreement, 42 were represented and established AC.1 for its seventieth session on 14 November 2018.

171. AC.1 invited the Chair of WP.29 to chair the session.

172. The results of the voting on the documents submitted, following the rules of procedure of Article 12 and the appendix of Revision 3 to the 1958 Agreement, can be found on this page of the GAR website.

173. The fifty-fourth session of the Executive Committee (AC.3) was held on 14 and 15 November 2018 and chaired by the representative of Japan. The representatives of 16 of the 37 contracting parties to the agreement attended: Australia, Canada, China, the European Union (representing Cyprus, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom), India, Japan, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Norway, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, San Marino, South Africa, Tunisia, the United States of America and Uzbekistan.

174. AC.3 noted the information, as of 5 November 2018, on the status of the Agreement of the Global Registry and of the Compendium of Candidates (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1073/Rev.23), the status of the priorities of the 1998 Agreement (based on WP.29-176-04 as reproduced in annex II to this report) and items on which the exchange of views should continue. AC.3 noted that notifications and the mandatory reports on the transposition process through their Permanent Missions in Geneva to the secretariat, are publicly accessible on the UN website. AC.3 agreed to always send the above-mentioned reports and notifications through their Permanent Missions in Geneva and directly to the secretariat (Edoardo Gianotti) to ensure updating of the status document, which is the monitoring tool of the agreement. Finally, AC.3 requested to its representatives to provide the secretariat with the coordinates of their corresponding focal points to the agreement, appointed in their capitals to draft the reports and notifications to keep them informed in the exchange of information through the above-mentioned website.

175. No new proposals for were submitted under this agenda item.

176. Submitted for consideration and vote, the proposal for Amendment 2 to UN GTR No. 9 on pedestrian safety (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/160, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/161 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/AC.3/31) was adopted on 14 November 2018 by consensus vote of the following contracting parties present and voting: Australia, China, the European Union (representing Cyprus, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom), India, Japan, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Norway, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, San Marino, South Africa and Uzbekistan.

177. The representatives from Canada, Tunisia and the United States of America abstained from voting.

178. No corrigenda were submitted for consideration and vote by AC.3

179. No documents were submitted for consideration and vote by AC.3 under this agenda item.

180. Contracting parties did not, at this time, request guidance under this agenda item.

181. AC.3 considered ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/164 (superseding ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/34) aimed at providing an updated overview of the priorities of the Programme of Work (PoW) of the development of UN GTRs or amendments to the existing ones. AC.3 endorsed ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/164, (corrected at page 4 by adding square brackets around the expected date for finalizing the RDE GTR to reflect the anticipated need for additional time for completion and corrected at page 6 concerning UN GTR No. 12 by replacing GRE with GRSG) and requested the secretariat to keep it as a reference for further update at its next sessions.

182. The representative of Japan introduced WP.29-176-31, which incorporates the comments of other contracting parties into former WP.29-175-29 that was distributed at its June 2018 session, concerning the priorities on new items, particularly those to be developed by GRVA (see agenda item 2.3, paras. 51-61 of this report).

183. The representative of the European Union, as technical sponsor for these activities, informed WP.29 about the status of work of the IWG on Environmental and Propulsion Performance Requirements (EPPR). He reported that a consensus was still being sought on the scope of UN GTR No. 2, on vehicle categories. He predicted that the official proposal for new amendments to UN GTR No. 2 would be submitted for consideration to the GRPE session in May 2019. The “correspondent group” recorded progress as expected on amending UN GTR No. 18, with both amendments developed in parallel to meet some contracting parties tight deadlines.

184. He noted that most contracting parties involved in the EPPR activities agreed to concentrate resources on durability once the work on amendments to UN GTR No. 2 and No. 18 had been delivered. He also shared the interest raised by the Republic of Korea to work on propulsion unit performance requirement in the near future.

185. The representative of Italy reported on the progress of work on harmonizing the provisions of UN GTR No. 3 and UN Regulation No. 78 according to the mandate (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/AC.3/47). He mentioned that, at the first session of GRVA, a formal document had been proposed by Italy, but that discussion was postponed until January 2019 since there was a need identified by technical services to improve language in the proposal to ensure a harmonized interpretation of the Antilock Braking System (ABS) related provisions, in specific cases.

186. The representative of the Republic of Korea reported on the progress of work of the IWG on Panoramic Sunroof Glazing (PSG) in developing an amendment to UN GTR No. 6. He informed AC.3 that that further research and testing activities on ceramic printer areas of glazing material had not started and that the IWG had preferred to adopt, in the meantime, a recommendation on ceramic printer areas. The representative of the United States of America confirmed that in absence of supporting data out of research, suitable performance requirements could not be agreed.

187. The representative of India introduced ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/167, the request for authorization to develop an amendment to UN GTR No.6 on Safety Glazing and the optional use of laminated-glass panes with improved mechanical properties especially for front, exterior, forward-facing glazing of the upper deck of a double-deck vehicle. The representative of the United States of America supported this initiative under the sponsorship of India and invited other contracting parties to sponsor other items under the 1998 Agreement.

188. AC.3 adopted ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/167 and requested the secretariat to prepare the corresponding AC.3 document.

189. The representative of Japan, technical sponsor of Phase 2 of UN GTR No. 7 on head restraints, informed AC.3 that IWG had submitted an official proposal of amendments, based on empirical data, to the UN GTR and a parallel one to UN Regulation No. 17 at the December 2018 session of GRSP. The representative from the United Kingdom confirmed that such proposals would be eventually complemented at the above-mentioned GRSP session or at its May 2019 session by: (a) the final status report by the IWG, and (b) a proposal of Addendum 1 to the Mutual Resolution No. 1 to incorporate drawings and specifications of the Bio Rear Impact Dummy.

190. Referring to the proposal of Amendment 3 revising the testing procedure of the head impact test, the representative of the United States of America informed AC.3 that his Administration previously had planned to issue a Notice of Proposed Rule-Making (NPRM) to get public comments to inform the IWG’s work. However, he added that given higher priorities and that his country does not have a regulation on this subject, it is not likely that national regulatory actions would be concluded by his Administration, but he indicated that his country would continue to follow the work in GRSP.

191. The representative of the Republic of Korea reported on the progress that the IWG on Deployable Pedestrian Protection Systems (IWG-DPPS) had achieved to design provisions covering active deployable systems in the bonnet area (Amendment 4 to the UN GTR) and introduced the Terms of Reference (ToR) of IWG (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/162). The representative of the United States of America clarified that the IWG had developed a table of issues and that his country had provided inputs and managed to solve some of them at the last IWG meeting (5-7 September 2018).

192. Finally, AC.3 adopted the ToR of IWG-DPPS (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/162).

193. The expert from the United States of America, on behalf of the Co-Chair of the IWG on the UN GTR No. 13 – Phase 2, informed AC.3 about the group’s progress. He reported that the last meeting of the IWG was held from 9 to 11 October 2018, in Brussels. He added that more than sixty participants from contracting parties, industry, standardizations organizations and academia attended the meeting. He added that the focus had mainly been on requirements for heavy duty vehicles and buses, material compatibility, tank stress rupture, fire test parameters and clarification of test procedures of the Phase 1 of the UN GTR. He added that work was carried out by five task forces on:

  1. heavy duty vehicles and buses,
  2. fuelling receptacle requirements,
  3. recommendations for test procedures,
  4. fire test and
  5. recommendations from standardizations organizations.
He finally informed AC.3 that the next meeting of the group was scheduled for March 2019 in North America.

194. The representative of the European Union, as technical sponsor, informed AC.3 that work was progressing according to schedule. He announced that the fifth amendment to UN GTR No.15 had been submitted as a working document for the January 2019 session of GRPE. He highlighted that the work on the transposition of UN GTR No. 15 into a UN Regulation remained a challenge, for example, with the topics of durability that might be excluded from the scope of the UN Regulation on WLTP, and would remain an element of the eighth Series of Amendments to UN Regulation No. 83.

195. The representative of the Netherlands, Chair of GRPE, introduced informal documents WP.29-176-14 and WP.29-176-27 presenting the impact on resources of developing a standalone UN GTR on determination of electrified vehicle power, and a draft request for authorization to develop a new UN GTR on determination of electrified vehicle power. He highlighted that both IWGs involved in drafting the regulatory provisions on the determination of electrified vehicle power considered that no or a very limited amount of extra resources are needed to develop a standalone UN GTR on the topic. He requested AC.3 to agree on developing a standalone UN GTR on determination of electrified vehicle power.

196. The representative of Japan highlighted that their delegation had agreed to such a standalone UN GTR during the last meeting of IWG EVE in Ottawa in October 2018.

197. AC.3 authorized the drafting group working on developing the procedure to determine the electrified vehicle power to develop a standalone UN GTR.

198. Consequently, the Chair of GRPE announced that the secretariat would prepare a working document to request authorization to develop a new UN GTR for consideration by AC.3 at its March 2019 session. AC.3 also requested to confirm that working document firstly by GRPE at its January 2019 session.

199. The representative of the Russian Federation, on behalf of the Chair of the IWG on Tyre GTR, recalled the activities on Amendment 2 to UN GTR No. 16 (Tyres), and reported on the results of the recent meetings held in Geneva (10-11 September 2018) and Brussels (30-31 October 2018). He commended the experts from Canada, the United States of America and their tyre industry for their substantial contributions. He further recalled the decision of WP.29 to pass tyre-related activities from the former GRRF to GRBP and presented an addendum to the authorization to develop Amendment No. 2 to UN GTR No. 16 to reflect this change (WP.29-176-15). He pointed out that the IWG on Tyre GTR should submit an official proposal for Amendment 2 to the September 2019 session of GRBP and recalled that the current mandate of IWG would expire November 2020. AC.3 supported WP.29-176-15 and invited the Russian Federation to submit this proposal as an official document for adoption at the March 2019 session.

200. The representative of the United States of America, on behalf of the Chair of the IWG on EVS UN GTR No. 20, Phase 2 and of GRSP, informed AC.3 on the work progress of the group. He said that the IWG had met in Sweden from 11 to 13 September 2018, had been attended by fifty experts, and that topics such as thermal propagation, water immersion, long-term fire resistance test, Rechargeable Electrical Energy Storage System vibration profile had been discussed. He announced that a full report of this meeting would be presented at the December 2018 session of GRSP. He finally announced that the next meeting of the IWG was planned from 23 to 24 January 2019, in Detroit, United States of America.

201. The expert from the United States of America, Chair of IWG on Quiet Road Transport Vehicle GTR (QRTV GTR), recalled his statement at the previous session of AC.3 and reported that a comparison report between UN Regulation No. 138 on QRTV, the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) on Minimum Sound Requirements for Hybrid and Electric Vehicles, as well as of other regional (European Union) or national (Canada, Japan, Republic of Korea) regulations in this area had been presented to the session of GRBP in September 2018. He pointed out that GRBP experts had been requested to review the comparison report, with a view to continuing policy discussions at the next GRB session in January 2019.

202. The representative of the United States of America recalled the earlier agreement of WP.29 to extend the mandate of IWG QRTV GTR until December 2019 (see para. 68 above) and suggested an extension for one more year. AC.3 endorsed the extension of the mandate of the IWG on QRTV until December 2020.

203. The representative of Canada provided an update on the latest activities of the Electric Vehicles and Environment (EVE) IWG on behalf of the EVE leadership. He noted that the EVE Informal Working Group had met since the last WP.29 session at a two-day working group meeting and a one-day drafting group meeting held in Ottawa from 16 to 18 October 2018. He noted that EVE continues to progress on its three assigned areas of work as described below.

204. The representative of Canada stated that the group had developed a first draft of a UN GTR on the determination of electrified vehicle power, and had conducted the first round of validation testing. Preliminary testing results had been presented in Ottawa. IWG EVE planned to continue developing the UN GTR as a standalone document in line with the acceptance in principal for this approach by AC.3 (pending an official revision of the authorization that would be submitted at the next session of AC.3 in March 2019, see item G).

205. The representative of Canada noted that EVE members had also presented research on battery durability. Efforts to model Electric Vehicle (EV) durability were led by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and validated using long-term EV testing results from Canada.

206. The representative of Canada explained that, in late September, the Secretary of the EVE had presented to the Group of Experts on Cleaner Electricity Production (CEP), the prospect of assuming leadership of the work to develop a method of stating the upstream emissions of electrified vehicles. CEP would consider taking on this work. He noted that EVE appreciated the assistance provided by the Secretary of GRPE in facilitating the interaction with CEP.

207. The representative of Canada noted that IWG EVE continues to work closely with IWG WLTP to ensure that the work of the two groups is complimentary and avoids duplication of efforts. He informed the Committee that IWG EVE would next meet at a half-day session concurrent with GRPE in January, and at a three-day working group and drafting group meeting in Stockholm in early April 2019.

208. The representative of the European Union, as technical sponsor, informed the Committee about the first meeting of the newly formed IWG on RDE, held on 11 and 12 September 2018. Experts from Canada, Japan, United States of America, European Union, OICA, AECC, International Council on Clean Transport (ICCT) and numerous European Union member States participated actively to the event. He noted that the tasks were more demanding than initially expected, and therefore the initial timeline had been reconsidered during the meeting. He announced that the new timeline would be discussed during the next GRPE session in January 2019.

209. He also welcomed the engagement of all parties which have declared interest in the work during the last session of GRPE in June 2018 and encouraged more involvement from China and India.

210. The representative of India reiterated their interest in participating and expressed her willingness to present the ongoing research in India on adapting RDE to the local context once this work had been finalized.

211. The representative of the United States of America informed AC.3 that they had withdrawn as Chair of the IWG. AC.3 noted that a solution to proceed with the IWG work would be sought at the December 2018 session of GRSP.

212. No subject was raised under this agenda item.

213. No new information was provided under this agenda item.

214. No subject was raised under this agenda item.

215. Of the 14 contracting parties to the agreement, nine were represented and established AC.4 for its twelfth session held on 14 November 2018.

216. Mr. B. Kisulenko from the Russian Federation was elected as Chair of AC.4.

217. No further supplementary information was provided beyond agenda item 7.2.
(see para. 128 above)

218. Submitted for consideration and vote, the proposed UN Rule No. [3] (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/70) was adopted on 14 November 2018 by consensus vote of the following contracting parties present and voting: Bulgaria, Finland, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Netherlands, Russian Federation and San Marino. Hungary and Romania abstained from voting.

219. Submitted for consideration and vote, the proposed UN Rule No. [4] (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2017/135) was adopted on 14 November 2018 by consensus vote of the following contracting parties present and voting: Bulgaria, Finland, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Netherlands, Russian Federation and San Marino. Hungary and Romania abstained from voting.

220. The representative of Romania stated that his country was not in the position to vote on UN Rules [3 and 4] due to procedural reasons. He voiced his country’s support for the work of AC.4 and expressed the expectation that Romania would adopt these rules once domestic procedural conditions would allow. He also said that it is difficult to implement at national level new UN Rules having supplementary requirements compared to the European Union PTI legislation in force.

221. The representative of Hungary stated that his country was not in the position to vote on UN Rules [3 and 4] due to procedural reasons. He voiced his country’s support for the work of AC.4 and expressed the expectation that Hungary would adopt these rules once domestic procedural conditions would allow.

222. No subject was raised under this agenda item.

Working Party on Lighting and Light-signalling | Session 82 | 22-25 Oct 2019

1. The Working Party on Lighting and Light-Signalling (GRE) held its eighty-second session from 22 to 25 October 2019 in Geneva, under the chairmanship of Mr. M. Loccufier (Belgium). Experts from the following countries participated in the work according to Rule 1 (a) of the Rules of Procedure of the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29) (TRANS/WP.29/690, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/690/Amends. 1 and 2): Belgium, China, Czechia, Cyprus, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Poland, Republic of Korea, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. An expert from the European Commission (EC) participated. Experts from the following non governmental organizations also took part in the session: European Association of Automotive Suppliers (CLEPA), International Automotive Lighting and Light Signalling Expert Group (GTB), International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), International Motorcycle Manufacturers Association (IMMA), International Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers (OICA), Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE).

2. GRE considered and adopted the agenda (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/1), as reproduced in GRE-82-01 together with the informal documents distributed during the session. GRE also noted the running order proposed by the Chair (GRE-82-14).

2. GRE considered and adopted the agenda (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/1), as reproduced in GRE-82-01 together with the informal documents distributed during the session. GRE also noted the running order proposed by the Chair (GRE-82-14).

3. The list of informal documents is contained in Annex I to the session report. The list of GRE informal groups is reproduced in Annex IV to the session report.

4. GRE took note of the highlights of the June 2019 session of WP.29 and the official document submission deadline of 24 January 2020 for the April 2020 session of GRE (GRE-82-19).

5. The Chair recalled that GRE was awaiting further progress of automated/autonomous vehicles to see if their light-signalling functions could become a subject for a new UN Global Technical Regulation (UN GTR).

6. No issues were discussed under this agenda item.

7. The expert from the Informal Working Group Simplification of the Lighting and Light-Signalling Regulations" (IWG SLR) reported on their progress (GRE-82-39). He requested GRE to provide guidance on the future development of UN Regulation No. [149] concerning the light sources and reduction in the number of beams. GRE agreed with the approach envisaged by IWG SLR.

8. GRE was informed that the three new simplified UN Regulations Nos. [148] on Light-Signalling Devices (LSD), [149] on Road Illumination Devices (RID) and [150] on Retro-Reflective Devices (RRD) were expected to enter into force on 15 November 2019. GRE noted that IWG SLR had identified errors inadvertently introduced in the text of the new UN Regulation No. [149] and that a correction had been submitted to the WP.29 session in November 2019 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2019/125, GRE-82-02). GRE supported the correction.

9. The expert from IWG SLR introduced corrections of mistakes and omissions in the text of the new UN Regulations Nos. [148], [149] and [150] (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/24, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/25 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/26). GRE adopted the corrections and mandated the secretariat to submit them to WP.29 and the Administrative Committee (AC.1) for consideration at their March 2020 sessions. GRE also requested the secretariat to verify with the United Nations Office for Legal Affairs (OLA) whether the adopted corrections could be introduced in the form of corrigenda to the original versions of the three new UN Regulations.

11. At the proposal to IWG SLR, GRE adopted further corrections to UN Regulation No. [148] (GRE-82-27, GRE-82-28, GRE-82-29 and Annex II) and requested the secretariat to submit them to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their March 2020 sessions.

12. GRE also noted draft consolidated proposals for amendments to UN Regulation Nos. [148] and [150] (GRE-82-30 and GRE-82-26). The Chair invited GRE experts to review these documents and send their comments to IWG SLR.

13. The expert from Italy proposed to correct a wrong reference in UN Regulation No. [149] (GRE-82-33). GRE adopted the correction (Annex III) and requested the secretariat to submit it to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their March 2020 sessions.

14. GRE recalled that, according to the mandate of IWG SLR, the requirements in the original series of the three new UN Regulations should be totally identical to the requirements in the device UN Regulations which had been frozen in the course of the simplification process. Therefore, GRE was of the view that eventual discrepancies should be corrected by means of supplements or corrigenda to the original series of the new UN Regulations, while substantial changes should only be introduced by the 01 series of amendments and supplements therein.

15. The expert of IWG SLR recalled that, in the course of the SLR process, the device UN Regulation had been “frozen” by introducing new series of amendments which did not require changes in the approval number (TRANS/WP.29/815, para. 82). He requested the secretariat to include a corresponding footnote in the final consolidated versions of the device UN Regulations.

16. The experts from France and Germany presented an updated proposal for amendments to UN Regulations Nos. 48 and 148, which introduce conditions for the use of logos of the vehicle or body manufacturer inside the illuminating surface of a signalling lamp (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/28 and GRE-82-32). The expert from CLEPA proposed adding the logo of the lamp manufacturer (GRE-82-20). The expert from OICA suggested a modified definition of “manufacturer logo” (GRE-82-36).

17. Several experts expressed their preference to completely prohibit the use of logos inside the lamps on safety concerns, while some others pointed out that road safety would not be compromised, as the lamps should meet all requirements in the respective UN Regulations. Some experts wondered whether the use of letters inside the logos was allowed. Following an in-depth discussion, GRE agreed that the “manufacturer logo” definition would need further clarification and invited the experts from France and Germany to submit a revised proposal for consideration at the next session. Pending the outcome of this discussion, GRE invited type approval authorities to refrain from granting type approvals to signalling lamps with logos inside the illuminating surface.

18. The expert from Germany presented an updated proposal which introduces requirements for testing the sun load impact into UN Regulation No. [148] (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/22). He further indicated that these amendments should be introduced by a new 01 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. [148], together with transitional provisions. The proposal received comments from Japan (GRE-82-38). The experts from the United Kingdom, CLEPA and OICA requested justification for additional testing in ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/22. Finally, GRE invited the expert from Germany, in cooperation with Japan, CLEPA and OICA, to complement the document with transitional provisions and research justification.

19. The expert from IWG SLR reported on the challenges of implementing the Unique Identifier (UI) in the new simplified UN Regulations (GRE-82-31) in the light of the progress of IWG on Database for the Exchange of Type Approval Documentation (DETA). GRE reiterated its view that for lighting and light-signalling devices, approval markings should be replaced by UI. At the same time, GRE noted that the access rights currently proposed by IWG DETA would not be sufficient for the efficient use of UI for the lighting and light-signalling UN Regulations. GRE mandated IWG SLR and the Chair to bring the specific GRE needs for the DETA access rights to the attention of IWG DETA and WP.29 at their forthcoming sessions in November 2019.

20. The expert from GTB proposed amendments to light source categories L1A/6 and L1B/6 in the Consolidated Resolution on the common specification of light source categories (R.E.5), together with an associated amendment to UN Regulation No. 128 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/15, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/16). GRE adopted both proposals and requested the secretariat to submit them, as appropriate, to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their March 2020 sessions as draft amendment 5 to R.E.5. and Supplement 10 to the original version of UN Regulation No. 128.

21. The expert of the Task Force on Substitutes and Retrofits (TF SR) presented their progress report (GRE-82-17-Rev.2) and sought the consent of GRE for the following activities of TF SR:

  • Not include Light Emitting Diode (LED) retrofits in UN Regulation No. 128.
  • Make UN Regulation No. 37 performance based and technology neutral by amending its scope to also include other light generating technologies, e.g. LED.
  • Allow interchange of light sources in the same category, as approved according to UN Regulation No. 37, independent of the technology used for light generation.

22. GRE agreed to the above activities.

23. The expert of TF SR proposed introducing requirements for LED substitute light sources into the new UN Regulation No. [149] on Road Illumination Devices (RID) (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/19). GRE adopted the proposal and recalled its general view on amending the three new simplified UN Regulations with substantially new provisions (see para. 14 above). Therefore, GRE decided to postpone the submission of ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/19 to WP.29 and AC.1 and to include it the future 01 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. [149] .

24. GRE recalled that, for UN Regulation No. [148], the new provisions on substitute light sources had already been submitted to the November 2019 sessions of WP.29 and AC.1 as part of draft Supplement 1 to the original series (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2019/81). Following the same approach, GRE agreed that these provisions should be removed from the original series of UN Regulation No. [148], once the 01 series of amendments is established.

25. GRE addressed a proposal by the expert of TF SR that introduced a new LED substitute light source category H11/LED in R.E.5 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/21, GRE-82-03 and GRE-82-12). The experts from France and the United Kingdom expressed concerns about the thermal behaviour of this category. The expert from IEC provided additional explanations (GRE-82-45). Nevertheless, GRE requested TF SR to address the raised issues at its next session on 10 December 2019 and invited all concerned experts to take part in the meeting.

28. The expert from the Special Interest Group (SIG) introduced a new draft series of amendments that defines the switching conditions of dipped-beam and Daytime Running Lamps (DRL) and the variable intensity of rear lamps in conjunction with traffic conditions (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/20 and GRE-82-07). The experts from Japan and EC proposed to reduce the speed threshold in paragraph 6.2.7.5.1. from 25 to 15 km/h (GRE-82-21). GRE supported this modification.

29. The expert of OICA proposed a new version of paragraph 6.19.7.4. (GRE-82-35-Rev.1) on switching of the rear position lamps together with DRLs. Some experts were of the view that the rear position lamps “shall be on” (i.e. always on) when DRLs are on, while others expressed preference to “may be on”, for the sake of reducing the energy consumption. Having extensively discussed this issue, GRE agreed that the rear position lamps “shall” be on in case of adverse weather conditions, however, the list of such conditions would need to be improved. GRE also noted that the transitional provisions in ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/20 had to be clarified. GRE invited SIG to consider the comments received and to submit a revised document to the next session.

30. On behalf of SIG, the expert from OICA introduced a proposal for a new series of amendments which clarifies the definitions of “switching” and “activation” and introduces the mandatory use of Emergency Stop Signal (ESS) (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/29, GRE-82-06 and GRE-82-11). The experts from EC and OICA suggested modified transitional provisions (GRE-82-23, GRE-82-34 and GRE-82-44-Rev.1). Finally, GRE adopted the proposal, as amended by Annex IV, and requested the secretariat to submit it to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their March 2020 sessions as draft 07 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 48.

31. The expert from IWG SLR recalled the previous discussions on the aiming diagram in paragraph 6.2.6.1.2. (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/81, para. 10 and Annex II) and presented GRE-82-25, which had been prepared in line with the GRE request. The expert from Poland proposed a revised diagram (GRE-82-43). For the diagram in GRE-82-25, the experts from Japan, Poland and the United Kingdom expressed their preference to maintain the 2000 lm criteria for automatic levelling and headlamp cleaning. The experts from Germany and the United Kingdom pointed out the need to consider the aiming tolerance for the purposes of, respectively, Periodic Technical Inspections (PTI) and Conformity of Production (CoP). GRE requested IWG SLR to consider the above elements and to prepare a revised document for the next session of GRE.

26. The expert from Germany tabled a proposal that allows the manual switch-off of all lighting devices in vehicles used by authorities responsible for maintaining public order (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/14 and GRE-82-41-Rev.1). Some experts were of the view that such a derogation should be addressed in the framework of national or regional rather than international law. Several experts indicated practical difficulties in identifying those vehicles when at the stage of type approval and manufacturing. GRE agreed to revert to the issue at the next session.

27. The expert from Poland proposed modifications to provisions on the rear registration plate lamps (GRE-82-08). Following a brief exchange of views, GRE invited the expert to submit a formal document for consideration at the next session.

32. On behalf of the Task Force on Electromagnetic Compatibility (TF EMC), the expert for OICA presented their status report (GRE-82-24).

33. The expert from the Netherlands proposed improving the text of paragraph of 3.1.8. (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/27). GRE adopted this proposal and requested the secretariat to submit it to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their March 2020 sessions as draft Supplement 1 to the 06 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 10.

34. The expert from India proposed making optional the fitment of front position lamps (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/18). The experts from France, Germany and the Netherlands were not in a position to support the proposal. The expert from India invited GRE to consider only the modification to paragraph 5.10. in ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/18. Following a brief exchange of views, GRE invited the expert from India to submit a separate document on the issue.

35. The expert from IMMA presented a consolidated text of the draft 03 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 53 which had incorporated the latest modifications to the 01 and 02 series (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/23 and GRE-82-16). GRE noted that these modifications had been also included in the draft 03 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 53 submitted for consideration of WP.29 and AC.1 in November 2019 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2019/80).

36. The expert from IMMA recalled the requirements on Adaptive Driving Beam (ADB) in UN Regulation No. 48 and proposed similar provisions for amending UN Regulation No. 53 (GRE-82-13, GRE-82-18, GRE-82-46-Rev.1). Following a brief exchange of views, the Chair invited GRE experts to send their comments to IMMA with a view to preparing an official document for consideration at the next session.

37. The expert from EC recalled the draft 03 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 53, which were submitted for consideration of WP.29 and AC.1 in November 2019 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2019/80) and proposed to shorten its transitional period from 1 September 2023 to 1 September 2021 (GRE-82-22). The expert from IMMA pointed out the technical challenges of implementing the 03 series of amendments and suggested that the original transitional provisions should be maintained (GRE-82-37). Following an in-depth discussion, GRE decided to keep the transitional period unchanged. At the same time, GRE agreed to scrutinize all future requests for long transitional provisions by the industry.

38. The expert from Poland proposed to clarify the definition of the “on” time for the case of a group of flashes (GRE-82-09). The expert from GTB pointed out that the GTB Working Group Photometry had recently considered an alternative wording for the same purpose. GRE invited both experts to submit a new proposal to the next session.

39. The expert from GTB proposed corrections (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/2019/17). GRE supported the amendments but decided to postpone their submission to WP.29 and AC.1, in order to combine them with the results of the discussion reflected in the previous paragraph.

40. GRE was briefed on the activities of IWG on the International Whole Vehicle Type Approval (IWVTA).

41. The Secretary of the Global Forum for Road Traffic Safety (WP.1) reported on the outcome of its session in September 2019. WP.1 had extensively discussed the amendments and decided to resume at the next session with the points (i), (j), (r), (t), 34, 35 and 36 in ECE/TRANS/WP.1/2017/1/Rev.1, and take into account Informal document No. 8 (March 2019), ECE/TRANS/WP.1/2019/10 (submitted by Slovakia) and ECE/TRANS/WP.1/2019/11 (submitted by Laser Europe).

42. He suggested that GRE should appoint a resource person who could participate in WP.1 sessions and would reply to technical questions from WP.1 participants. He also briefed GRE on the WP.1 activity on highly and fully automated vehicles. The Chair recalled the GRE and WP.29 discussions on the signalling requirements for automated/autonomous vehicles (see para. 53 below) and sought the opinion of WP.1 on this matter. To this end, the WP.1 Secretary invited an expert from a contracting party to the Convention on Road Traffic (Vienna, 1968) to submit to the next session of WP.1 in March 2020, a short informal document on the pros and cons of different positions. The expert from Germany volunteered to prepare the paper.

43. No new information was reported under this agenda item.

44. The secretariat reported that ITC, at its eighty-first session in 2019, had adopted the ITC Strategy until 2030, invited its subsidiary bodies to follow-up by aligning their work with the strategy and requested the secretariat to take the necessary actions to promote the implementation of the strategy (ECE/TRANS/288, paras. 15 (a), (c) and (g)). Furthermore, the Committee had expressed its concern for the limited progress in meeting the Sustainable Development Goal targets on road safety and those of the United Nations Decade of Action for Road Safety (ibid, para. 64) (GRE-82-42).

45. GRE noted that, in order to help countries, particularly new contracting parties, to further implement legal instruments in the area of road safety, the secretariat had prepared the draft ITC Recommendations for Enhancing National Road Safety Systems for comments by the Working Parties. GRE stressed the importance of this document and invited GRE experts to transmit their comments to the secretariat by 5 November 2019 at the latest.

46. Due to lack of time, GRE decided to postpone this issue to the next session.

47. The expert from GTB presented driver assistance projections as a new feature of the adaptive driving beam with the aim to increase driver’s comfort and road safety (GRE-82-40). The presentation was accompanied by a live demonstration of three vehicles equipped with the new feature. To allow for the driver assistance projections, the expert proposed amendments to UN Regulations Nos. 48 and [149] (GRE-82-04, GRE-82-40).

48. GRE welcomed both GTB presentation and demonstration. Several experts were of the view that the new system could bring safety benefits provided that:

  • Road projections symbols are standardized (e.g. according to UN Regulation No. 121).
  • Road projections symbols do not distract other drivers.

49. The expert from Japan informed GRE about his intention to commission a study on the reaction time when symbols are used. The expert of Finland recalled an ongoing discussion on the field view assistant within the Working Party on General Safety Provisions (GRSG) and called for cooperation between GRE and GRSG. GRE invited GTB to consider the comments made and decided to revert to the issue at the next session.

50. The expert from Poland proposed to add a reference to DRL in paragraph 4.4.1. of UN Regulations No. [148] (GRE-82-10-Rev.1). The expert from IWG SLR stated that this proposal would be included into the consolidated package of amendments to the above UN Regulation.

51. The expert from India proposed deleting the prohibition to use lighting and light-signalling devices other than those prescribed in UN Regulations Nos. 53 and 74 (GRE-82-15). Several experts disagreed with this proposal and therefore GRE did not support it.

52. The secretariat drew the attention of GRE to the fact that the new definition of “External status indicator”, which had been introduced by Supplement 11 to the 06 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 48 (paragraphs 2.7. and 2.37 of ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/84), was left out of Supplement 12 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2018/99/Rev.2). GRE requested the secretariat to submit a rectifying document to the March 2020 sessions of WP.29 and AC.1.

53. The secretariat reported on the WP.29 considerations, at its June 2019 session, of the signalling requirements for automated/autonomous vehicles (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1147, paras. 47–50). GRE noted that WP.29 had not been in a position to reach a common position and had referred this issue to WP.1. GRE noted that the Committee for Coordination of Work (WP.29/AC.2) had invited the WP.29 Working Parties (GRs) to identify their priorities with a view to including them into the Programme of Work of WP.29 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2019/1/Rev.1). GRE requested IWG SLR to prepare a draft list of GRE priorities.

55. GRE agreed to keep the same structure of the provisional agenda with the new UN Regulations Nos. [148], [149] and [150] becoming sub-items of item 4.

56. In compliance with Rule 37 of the Rules of Procedure (TRANS/WP.29/690 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/690/Amend.1), GRE called for the election of officers. The representatives of the contracting parties, present and voting, elected unanimously Mr. M. Loccufier (Belgium) as Chair and Mr. D. Rovers (Netherlands) as Vice-Chair for the sessions of GRE scheduled in the year 2020.