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WP.29 Agreement
1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic

Convention on Road Traffic

The 1968 Vienna Convention covers road traffic safety regulations and as such establishes principles to govern traffic laws. One of the fundamental prinicples of the Convention has been the concept that a driver is always fully in control and responsible for the behavior of a vehicle in traffic.

With the advent of automatic systems to direct the behavior of various vehicle systems such as lighting, but increasingly towards collision avoidance, this basic principle is no longer completely in concert with advanced vehicle technologies.

Consequently, WP.29 has engaged in discussions with Working Party 1, which is responsible for the Convention, to address inconsistencies between the Convention and WP.29 regulations.

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1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic Texts and Status

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Related News and Information

25 Aug 2016 25 Aug 2016 | Self-driving cars hit European speed bump EC and EU European Commission and European Union Convention on Road Traffic The 1968 Vienna Convention covers road traffic safety regulations and as such establishes principles to govern traffic laws. One of the fundamental prinicples of the Convention has been the concept that a driver is always fully in control and responsible for the behavior of a vehicle in traffic. With the advent of automatic systems to direct the behavior of various vehicle systems such as lighting, but increasingly towards collision avoidance, this basic principle is no longer completely in concert with advanced vehicle technologies. Consequently, WP.29 has engaged in discussions with Working Party 1, which is responsible for the Convention, to address inconsistencies between the Convention and WP.29 regulations. 1968 Vienna Convention 1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic United Nations Agreement 1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic and To one degree or another, automated driving technologies take over functions previously assured entirely by the driver. At one level, driver assistance systems aid the driver in controlling the vehicle. However, technologies have advanced to the point where automated systems propose to replace the driver in controlling various aspects of vehicle behavior. For example, lane-keeping assistance systems propose to intervene in the steering of the vehicle in order to maintain the vehicle within a lane of travel. At the furthest point in the spectrum, autonomous vehicles propose to assume full responsibility for vehicle behavior without any driver intervention. As a result, such technologies undermine the fundamental assumption that the driver is responsible for the vehicle and thus present the regulatory community with a host of unprecedented opportunities and challenges in ensuring road safety. WP.29 has undertaken to address these issues on a global basis in order to seek uniform worldwide responses that will promote the use of these technologies while ensuring their safe introduction into road traffic. Automated Driving Automated Driving and Autonomous Vehicles WP.29 Regulatory Project Automated Driving and Autonomous Vehicles
23 Mar 2016 23 Mar 2016 | UNECE paves the way for automated driving by updating UN international convention Convention on Road Traffic The 1968 Vienna Convention covers road traffic safety regulations and as such establishes principles to govern traffic laws. One of the fundamental prinicples of the Convention has been the concept that a driver is always fully in control and responsible for the behavior of a vehicle in traffic. With the advent of automatic systems to direct the behavior of various vehicle systems such as lighting, but increasingly towards collision avoidance, this basic principle is no longer completely in concert with advanced vehicle technologies. Consequently, WP.29 has engaged in discussions with Working Party 1, which is responsible for the Convention, to address inconsistencies between the Convention and WP.29 regulations. 1968 Vienna Convention 1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic United Nations Agreement 1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic, To one degree or another, automated driving technologies take over functions previously assured entirely by the driver. At one level, driver assistance systems aid the driver in controlling the vehicle. However, technologies have advanced to the point where automated systems propose to replace the driver in controlling various aspects of vehicle behavior. For example, lane-keeping assistance systems propose to intervene in the steering of the vehicle in order to maintain the vehicle within a lane of travel. At the furthest point in the spectrum, autonomous vehicles propose to assume full responsibility for vehicle behavior without any driver intervention. As a result, such technologies undermine the fundamental assumption that the driver is responsible for the vehicle and thus present the regulatory community with a host of unprecedented opportunities and challenges in ensuring road safety. WP.29 has undertaken to address these issues on a global basis in order to seek uniform worldwide responses that will promote the use of these technologies while ensuring their safe introduction into road traffic. Automated Driving Automated Driving and Autonomous Vehicles WP.29 Regulatory Project Automated Driving and Autonomous Vehicles, and Uniform Provisions Concerning the Approval of Vehicles with regard to Steering Equipment Steering Equipment Steering Equipment UN Regulation No. 79 UN R79
9 Feb 2016 9 Feb 2016 | U.S. tells Google computers can qualify as drivers NHTSA and USA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and United States of America Convention on Road Traffic The 1968 Vienna Convention covers road traffic safety regulations and as such establishes principles to govern traffic laws. One of the fundamental prinicples of the Convention has been the concept that a driver is always fully in control and responsible for the behavior of a vehicle in traffic. With the advent of automatic systems to direct the behavior of various vehicle systems such as lighting, but increasingly towards collision avoidance, this basic principle is no longer completely in concert with advanced vehicle technologies. Consequently, WP.29 has engaged in discussions with Working Party 1, which is responsible for the Convention, to address inconsistencies between the Convention and WP.29 regulations. 1968 Vienna Convention 1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic United Nations Agreement 1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic and To one degree or another, automated driving technologies take over functions previously assured entirely by the driver. At one level, driver assistance systems aid the driver in controlling the vehicle. However, technologies have advanced to the point where automated systems propose to replace the driver in controlling various aspects of vehicle behavior. For example, lane-keeping assistance systems propose to intervene in the steering of the vehicle in order to maintain the vehicle within a lane of travel. At the furthest point in the spectrum, autonomous vehicles propose to assume full responsibility for vehicle behavior without any driver intervention. As a result, such technologies undermine the fundamental assumption that the driver is responsible for the vehicle and thus present the regulatory community with a host of unprecedented opportunities and challenges in ensuring road safety. WP.29 has undertaken to address these issues on a global basis in order to seek uniform worldwide responses that will promote the use of these technologies while ensuring their safe introduction into road traffic. Automated Driving Automated Driving and Autonomous Vehicles WP.29 Regulatory Project Automated Driving and Autonomous Vehicles
8 Jan 2016 8 Jan 2016 | Liability for autonomous vehicles To one degree or another, automated driving technologies take over functions previously assured entirely by the driver. At one level, driver assistance systems aid the driver in controlling the vehicle. However, technologies have advanced to the point where automated systems propose to replace the driver in controlling various aspects of vehicle behavior. For example, lane-keeping assistance systems propose to intervene in the steering of the vehicle in order to maintain the vehicle within a lane of travel. At the furthest point in the spectrum, autonomous vehicles propose to assume full responsibility for vehicle behavior without any driver intervention. As a result, such technologies undermine the fundamental assumption that the driver is responsible for the vehicle and thus present the regulatory community with a host of unprecedented opportunities and challenges in ensuring road safety. WP.29 has undertaken to address these issues on a global basis in order to seek uniform worldwide responses that will promote the use of these technologies while ensuring their safe introduction into road traffic. Automated Driving Automated Driving and Autonomous Vehicles WP.29 Regulatory Project Automated Driving and Autonomous Vehicles and Convention on Road Traffic The 1968 Vienna Convention covers road traffic safety regulations and as such establishes principles to govern traffic laws. One of the fundamental prinicples of the Convention has been the concept that a driver is always fully in control and responsible for the behavior of a vehicle in traffic. With the advent of automatic systems to direct the behavior of various vehicle systems such as lighting, but increasingly towards collision avoidance, this basic principle is no longer completely in concert with advanced vehicle technologies. Consequently, WP.29 has engaged in discussions with Working Party 1, which is responsible for the Convention, to address inconsistencies between the Convention and WP.29 regulations. 1968 Vienna Convention 1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic United Nations Agreement 1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic
4 Sep 2015 4 Sep 2015 | Autonomous driving takes back seat as connected car rules prepared EU, Germany, and UK European Union, Germany, and United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland Convention on Road Traffic The 1968 Vienna Convention covers road traffic safety regulations and as such establishes principles to govern traffic laws. One of the fundamental prinicples of the Convention has been the concept that a driver is always fully in control and responsible for the behavior of a vehicle in traffic. With the advent of automatic systems to direct the behavior of various vehicle systems such as lighting, but increasingly towards collision avoidance, this basic principle is no longer completely in concert with advanced vehicle technologies. Consequently, WP.29 has engaged in discussions with Working Party 1, which is responsible for the Convention, to address inconsistencies between the Convention and WP.29 regulations. 1968 Vienna Convention 1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic United Nations Agreement 1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic and To one degree or another, automated driving technologies take over functions previously assured entirely by the driver. At one level, driver assistance systems aid the driver in controlling the vehicle. However, technologies have advanced to the point where automated systems propose to replace the driver in controlling various aspects of vehicle behavior. For example, lane-keeping assistance systems propose to intervene in the steering of the vehicle in order to maintain the vehicle within a lane of travel. At the furthest point in the spectrum, autonomous vehicles propose to assume full responsibility for vehicle behavior without any driver intervention. As a result, such technologies undermine the fundamental assumption that the driver is responsible for the vehicle and thus present the regulatory community with a host of unprecedented opportunities and challenges in ensuring road safety. WP.29 has undertaken to address these issues on a global basis in order to seek uniform worldwide responses that will promote the use of these technologies while ensuring their safe introduction into road traffic. Automated Driving Automated Driving and Autonomous Vehicles WP.29 Regulatory Project Automated Driving and Autonomous Vehicles
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Development of the Regulation

Pending Changes to 1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic

Latest Documents

3 Oct 2018
Report of the Global Forum for Road Traffic Safety on its 77th session | WP.1/165
15 Jun 2018
Draft updated terms of reference for the PTI informal group | WP.29-175-10
14 Jun 2018
Minutes of the 11th PTI informal group session | PTI-11-02
See all 53 related documents

Latest Meeting Discussions

World Forum for the Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations | Session 176 | 12-16 Nov 2018
Working Party on Lighting and Light-signalling | Session 80 | 23-26 Oct 2018
Working Party on Road Traffic Safety | Session 177 | 18-21 Sep 2018
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