World Forum
World Forum for the Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations
161st session | Geneva | 12-15 Nov 2013 Download Copy
Agenda Item 17.1. | GTR No. 2 (Worldwide Motorcycle emission Test Cycle (WMTC))
Documentation
GRPE/66 | Report of the GRPE on its 66th session
WP.29/2013/127 | Request for authorization to develop amendments to GTR No. 2 and new regulations on environmental and propulsion performance requirements for light vehicles (EU)

95. The representative of EU reported on the work progress of the IWG on Environmental and Propulsion Performance Requirements (EPPR) for L-category vehicles. He introduced a proposal to develop amendments to UN GTR No. 2 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/127), aimed at inserting environmental and propulsion performance requirements and at extending the scope to three-wheeled vehicles. He added that the proposal also aimed at developing new UN GTRs and Regulations on environmental and propulsion performance requirements for light vehicles, specifying new provisions on (i) crank case and evaporative emissions, (ii) On Board Diagnostic Systems (OBD) and (iii) propulsion unit performances (i.e. power, torque and maximum speed). He concluded his report indicating that the terms of reference and rules of procedures of EPPR had been annexed to the GRPE report ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/66. AC.3 endorsed the proposal and requested the secretariat to prepare a corresponding AC.3 document for transmission to GRPE. The Representative of IMMA stated the industry’s support to the IWG EPPR and emphasized the importance of the decision taken in the IWG to give priority to the work on two-wheelers, in particular L3 vehicles. He also emphasized the high ambition of the IWG to deliver the results and final report in 2016.

Previous Discussion(s)

Working Party on Pollution and Energy | Session 66 | 3-7 Jun 2013

2. Following a brief intervention of the secretary of WP.29, underlining the importance of the WLTP work and offering the support of the secretariat, GRPE adopted the agenda (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/5 and Corr.1). GRPE added new items on Vehicles Indoor Air Quality (VIAQ), the carcinogenicity of diesel engine exhaust gases, and tributes (as specified in GRPE-66-18-Rev.3). GRPE noted GRPE-66-01-Rev.2, on the organization of GRPE informal group meetings.

5. The secretariat informed GRPE about items discussed in the last session of the World Forum (held in March 2013) (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1102), reporting the information summarized in GRPE-66-15.

No report

13. The secretary of the WLTP informal subgroup on the Development of the Harmonized driving Cycle (DHC) introduced GRPE-66-34, containing the report on the progress made since January 2013. Having stated that almost all open issues were successfully closed, he reported that DHC successfully developed the harmonized test cycles, including the downscale procedure (even if the downscale calculation formula requires finalization after correcting minor issues), the mode construction, and the gear shift prescription (notwithstanding continued work for its improvement). A draft final report on the development of the Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Cycle (WLTC) is already available and will be included in the Technical Report.

20. The Chair of the informal group on MACTP reported that the MACTP group did not meet before the GRPE proper session and requested a meeting in conjunction with the next ordinary GRPE session, in January 2014. The expert from the EC added that the first round of pilot testing was successfully finalized, notwithstanding some issues related with the recirculation strategy of one of the vehicles being tested and the need to repeat the test with manual recirculation settings.

22. Having introduced ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/11, containing a proposal for the transposition of the Euro 6 legislation on the exhaust emissions of pollutants into the UN Regulation No. 83 (as explained also in GRPE-66-22), the expert from the EC explained that further amendments to the Euro 6 regulations are expected to be agreed upon in July 2013. The original plan was to include these amendments in UN Regulation No. 83 with the adoption of ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/11 (as amended by GRPE-66-04-Rev.1, concerning the choice of tyres) during the current GRPE session, and to submit the changes that will be agreed upon in July 2013 to the January 2014 session of GRPE.

No report

31. The secretary of the HDH group introduced GRPE-66-23 and GRPE-66-24, containing information on the HDH work progress. He summarized the thirteenth and fourteenth group meetings, underlining the decision to include a new annex in UN GTR No. 4, amending it. Having explained the status of validation test programmes, he required further input from Contracting Parties, by October 2013, on the assessment of chassis dynamometer and power-pack testing. He acknowledged that the Environmental Protection Agency of the USA requested to include powertrain testing and verification in the UN GTR and expressed the interest to take part in the second validation test programme. A drafting group for the UN GTR has been established, although the nomination of a technical secretary is still outstanding. A draft will be submitted to the next ordinary GRPE session, in January 2014, when a final report will also be submitted. The official submission of the text amending UN GTR No. 4 is expected for June 2014.

34. Following an overview on the work of the REC group (GRPE-66-42), the Chair of the REC group illustrated ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/6, a proposal for a new UN Regulation on REC, as well as: (i) GRPE-66-28, superseding GRPE-66-06 and modifying ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/6 to introduce limit values and to include a set of flow charts in its Annex 8; and (ii) a draft proposal for the 01 series of amendments to the UN Regulation on REC (GRPE-66-07). These texts aim at facilitating the improvement of the ambient air quality via the reduction of the emissions of particulate matter and/or NOX. They address the emissions of NO2 via four classes of systems. The only outstanding issue for the 01 series of amendments concerns the NO2 emission requirements of traps that allow for a restricted increase of the direct emissions of NO2 (GRPE-66-08).

35. GRPE adopted ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/6, as amended by GRPE-66-28, and requested the secretariat to submit the resulting proposal to WP.29 and AC.1, for consideration at their November 2013 sessions.

36. GRPE also requested the REC informal group to submit an updated version of the first amendment to the UN Regulation on REC (GRPE-66-07), reflecting the updates emerging from further discussions, so that the secretariat can prepare an official document for the GRPE session of January 2014.

No report

45. GRPE did not receive any new proposal to amend UN Regulations Nos. 96 and 120.

46. There were no proposals to amend UN Global Technical Regulation No. 11.

No report

58. GRPE did not receive any new proposal to amend UN Regulations Nos. 40 and 47.

59. GRPE did not receive any new proposal to amend UN GTR No. 2.

60. The secretary of the informal group on EVE introduced GRPE-66-38, reporting on recent meetings and the development of the regulatory reference guide. He gave details on the review of a questionnaire, the use of definitions, the involvement of OICA in the review process and the drafting phase. He underlined the importance of coordination with other GRPE working groups, mentioning specifically the VPSD, WLTP, HDH and EPPR. The group is now considering potential regulatory gaps concerning vehicle energy efficiency and range, battery performance and durability. Regulatory incentives, standards, and electric vehicle charging will also be included in the guide. Having invited stakeholders to submit information that can contribute to the improvement of the recommendations, he concluded with a brief overview on the forthcoming meetings and activities of the group.

61. GRPE acknowledged the progress made by the group.

62. The Chair of GRPE and the VPSD informal group introduced GRPE-66-29, containing a report on the development of a framework system of definitions regarding vehicles, powertrains, energy converters (e.g. internal combustion engine, electric machine, fuel cell), and energy storage systems (e.g. fuel tank, fuel cylinders, battery). The definitions, developed in close cooperation with WLTP, will be submitted to GRPE, WP.29 and AC.3 to be introduced as annexes to R.E.3 and S.R.1. This will be accompanied by an explanatory report on the VPSD work. The terms and structure of the main definitions are now agreed, even if some open issues are still under consideration. A document will be submitted to GRPE in January 2014.

63. GRPE acknowledged the progress made by the group and agreed to submit to WP.29 the request for an extension of its mandate to March 2014.

64. Following a summary of the GRPE Chair, recalling that recommendations on fuel quality have been included in R.E.3 and S.R.1, the expert from OICA underlined the importance to link cleaner vehicles with cleaner fuels. He stressed that the latter are enabling the introduction of effective pollutant emission control technologies on the former and reported that an informal document on these issues will be submitted to the next ordinary session of GRPE, in January 2014.

65. GRPE agreed to maintain fuel quality on the agenda of its next ordinary session.

66. Having acknowledged the withdrawal of the comments from OICA (GRPE-66-33), the IWVTA ambassador introduced GRPE-66-13. He recalled that the sixty-sixth GRPE session represents a deadline for GRPE to decide about the level of priority of the UN Regulations listed in GRPE 66-13. He reminded GRPE about the need to review the candidate items applicable to IWVTA and recalled the necessity to identify sponsors for the development of each IWVTA candidate item. He did not receive any comment from Contracting Parties on changes to the expected amendments of UN Regulations.

67. The expert from OICA confirmed the withdrawal of GRPE-66-33 and expressed agreement with the A-priorities outlined in GRPE-66-13.

68. Reviewing the candidate items, GRPE confirmed that the indications on the priorities contained in GRPE-66-13 are correct. GRPE considered that the sponsors for items No. 52 and 56 cannot be identified until the WLTP UN GTR is adopted and transposed in UN Regulations Nos. 83 and 101 or into a new UN Regulation. The IWVTA requirements will need to be taken into account at the moment of transposition of the WLTP UN GTR. The sponsors in charge of the transpositions will be in charge of assuring the coherence with the IWVTA requirements.

69. Following the GRPE session of January 2013, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/50, containing a proposal for a new Regulation on recyclability of motor vehicles, has been submitted for consideration to the session of WP.29 to be held on 25-28 June 2013.

70. The expert from the Russian Federation introduced GRPE-66-37, containing a proposal to include provisions on the inclusion of labelling of plastic components and the release of information on the use of heavy metals. The expert from OICA introduced GRPE-66-41, containing some changes to the proposal in GRPE-66-37. He suggested some modifications for the labelling of plastic components, and more substantial amendments on heavy metals. The latter suggest addressing the management of material and substance restrictions for lead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium through contractual arrangements with suppliers, in order to avoid substantial administrative burdens. The expert from the EC announced the EC availability to discuss the proposed amendments with the aim to find a suitable compromise. He also reported that, due to administrative issues, the EC will not be in the position to vote for this UN Regulation in the June 2013 session of WP.29.

71. GRPE invited interested stakeholders to reach an agreement, encouraging them to do so before the next WP.29 in June 2013. If agreement is reached, GRPE expressed its support for an adoption by WP.29 in November 2013. This proposal will be transmitted back to GRPE in January 2014 for further consideration if an agreement is not reached amongst the interested parties.

72. As required by WP.29, GRPE considered a proposal to amend UN Rule No. 1 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/64). The Contracting Parties of the 1997 Agreement did not express negative comments on it. GRPE endorsed the proposal.

74. In compliance with Rule 37 of the Rules of Procedure (TRANS/WP.29/690 and Amend.1), and taking into account for the extraordinary nature of the GRPE session scheduled for November 2013, GRPE unanimously re-elected Mr. C. Albus (Germany) and Mr. S. R. Marathe (India) as its Chair and Vice-Chair, respectively, for the sessions of the year 2014. They will also remain in charge for the extraordinary GRPE session of November 2013.

No report

73. GRPE did not receive any new proposal to share information under this agenda item. As agreed while discussing agenda item 4(a), GRPE invited the expert from the EC to provide an update on the European policy concerning CO2 emissions from heavy duty vehicles in the next ordinary GRPE session, in January 2014.

No report

81. Learning that Mr. Yannick Souchet (France) and Mr. Aldo Bassi (Italy) would no longer attend the sessions because of their retirement, GRPE acknowledged their considerable contributions to the activities of the group and wished them all the best.

3. The informal documents distributed during the GRPE session are listed in Annex I [of the meeting report]. Annex II contains a list of the informal meetings held in conjunction with the GRPE session. Annex III lists GRPE informal working groups, task forces and subgroups, giving details on their Chairs, secretaries, and on the end of their mandate.

1. The Working Party on Pollution and Energy (GRPE) held its sixty-sixth session from 3 to 7 June 2013, with Mr. Christoph Albus (Germany) as Chair and Mr. Shrikant Marathe (India) as vice-Chair.

Experts from the following countries participated in the work following Rule 1(a) of the Rules of Procedure of the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29) (TRANS/WP.29/690, as amended):

Austria; Belgium; Canada; China; France; Germany; Hungary; India; Italy; Japan; Netherlands; Norway; Poland; Republic of Korea (Korea); Russian Federation; South Africa; Spain; Sweden; Switzerland; United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (UK); United States of America (USA). Experts from the European Commission (EC) also participated.

Experts from the following non-governmental organizations took part in the session:

Association for Emissions Control by Catalyst (AECC); Association of European Manufacturers of Internal Combustion Engines (EUROMOT); European Association of Automobile Suppliers (CLEPA/MEMA/JAPIA); European Federation for Transport and Environment (T&E); European Liquefied Petroleum Gas Association (AEGPL); European Tyre and Rim Technical Organization (ETRTO); International Association for Natural Gas Vehicles (IANGV/NGV Global); International Automobile Federation (FIA); International Motorcycle Manufacturers Association (IMMA); and International Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers (OICA).

Upon the special invitation of the Chair, the experts from the following entities also attended:

Environmental Industries Commission (EIC); European Association for Advanced Rechargeable Batteries (RECHARGE), Horiba Limited; Hyundai Mobis; Korea Automobile Manufacturers Association (KAMA); Technical Committee of Petroleum Additive Manufacturers in Europe (CEFIC-ATC).

4. The secretariat introduced GRPE-66-14-Rev.1, with general information about the session. An extraordinary GRPE session will take place on 14 November 2013. The deadline for the submission of official working documents is 22 August 2013. The next ordinary GRPE session will take place on 7-10 January 2014. The deadline for the submission of official working documents for the January 2014 session is 15 October 2013. Chairs and secretaries of informal working groups were invited to approach the secretariat to define the calendar of meetings of informal working groups for the ordinary session.

6. No documents were transmitted by GRPE for adoption by WP.29 in March 2013.

7. Considering the 1997 Agreement on Periodical Technical Inspections, WP.29 adopted a revised road map (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1102, Annex II), developed by the Russian Federation and the International Motor Vehicle Inspection Committee (CITA), for the update of UN Rules. The World Forum also requested its subsidiary Working Parties (including GRPE) to consider ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/64, containing a proposal to amend UN Rule No. 1.

8. Prior to the consideration at its June 2013 session, the World Forum asked GRPE to provide technical input to the report on diesel exhaust emissions, taking into account the incorporation of the comments and the inclusion of recommendations in the latest draft.

9. WP.29 adopted the Environmentally Friendly Vehicles (EFV) summary report and decided to freeze the activities of the EFV informal working group and the EFV task force group.

10. WP.29 acknowledged the nomination of the expert from Spain as the GRPE Ambassador for issues concerning the International Whole Vehicle Type Approval (IWVTA) and considered a first draft of the revised 1958 Agreement (WP.29-159-19). A final draft is expected in November 2013, when the submission of a first draft of the Regulation No. 0 (containing requirements for the whole vehicle type approval) is also scheduled.

11. Following an update on the status of the work on the Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Procedures (WLTP), WP.29 confirmed to the GRPE Chair its availability to provide guidance at its June 2013 session, in case of remaining issues.

12. The updated terms of reference of the informal working group on Electric Vehicles and the Environment (EVE), adopted by GRPE in its last session (January 2013), will be considered in the June 2013 of WP.29.

14. Responding to a question by the expert from Italy, the expert from the EC clarified work for regional weighting factors is ongoing in the European Union. He specified that Contracting Parties do not need to apply regional weighting factors for the harmonized cycle, even if there is a possibility to apply regional weighting factors if this is justified by regional driving characteristics. Having mentioned that the application of regional weighting factors can be further discussed, he added that this is not envisaged at the moment and he agreed with the GRPE recommendation to clarify this issue also in Part A of the UN GTR text.

15. The Chair of the informal subgroup on the Development of the Test Procedure (DTP) reported on the work status of the subgroup (GRPE-66-36). He stated that there are a number of remaining open issues that need to be addressed. According to the mandate documents (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/AC.3/26 and Add.1) three phases are included in the WLTP terms of reference: phase I, concerning the development of the UN GTR (test cycle and test procedure); phase II, concerning on-board diagnostics (OBD) and additional tests (e.g. on pollutants other than CO, NOX, hydrocarbons and particulate matter); and phase III, about reference fuels and performance requirements. Phase I can be further divided in two stages, with the aim to continue work on still open issues and to improve and correct the text of the GTR based on validation and experience. The issues that are foreseen to be solved in phase I, stage 1, include: (i) Rechargeable electric energy storage system Charge Balance (RCB) correction; (ii) the warm-up procedure for the road load and dynamometer setting; (iii) the speed trace violation, concerning deviations from the test cycle beyond the prescribed tolerances; (iv) the definition of the predominant mode for vehicles with multimode gearboxes; and (v) the temperature correction for regional representative conditions for the CO2 emission determination. Other issues could be finalized in phase I, stage 1, or eventually (in a fall back solution) postponed to stage 2: (i) the table of running resistances, concerning default values to be used in the dynamometer settings if the road load cannot be determined; (ii) the ambient temperature for coast-down (the latest discussions were settling on 5 to 40°C ± 5°C); and (iii) utility factors on electric vehicles. If an agreement is not reached in phase 1, stage 1, the issues will need to be defined regionally. Concluding his intervention of the status of the DTP subgroup, the DTP Chair reported that, even if the coast down and wheel torque methods are agreed, the wind tunnel and the comparison of road load determination methods are likely to be addressed in phase I, stage 2.

16. Reporting on the development of the WLTP regulatory text, the DTP Chair explained that a draft UN GTR was uploaded to the UNECE website prior to the GRPE session (GRPE-66-02). He recalled that there are a number of major open drafting points and outlined the schedule of forthcoming meetings and milestones for the completion of the drafting work. He specified that: (i) the analysis of results emerging from the GRPE discussion will be completed before end of June 2013; (ii) a meeting for the solution of outstanding issues is foreseen for the end of June 2013 in Brussels; (iii) the draft UN GTR will be circulated to WLTP members in early July 2013; (iv) a drafting group meeting will take place between 19 July 2013 and the last week of July 2013; (v) the finalisation of the draft of the UN GTR will be completed before the submission deadline for the working documents of the November 2013 session of GRPE. WP.29 is then expected to consider the text in March 2014. On the content of the regulatory text, he confirmed that the UN GTR will include an explanatory section (part A). A technical report on the UN GTR will be available as an informal document for the November 2013 session of GRPE.

17. The DTP Chair and the expert from the EC agreed that part A will be drafted by the EC, while the technical report will be delivered by an expert contracted in the framework of the DTP activities. Both these documents will be circulated to Contracting Parties for their inputs. The expert from the EC mentioned that the text of part A will be finalized by the end of July 2013. Given the involvement of OICA for the WLTP development, the expert from OICA informed GRPE about his availability and interest to contribute the preparation of the text of part A and the technical report.

18. Having recalled the mandate documents (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/AC.3/26 and Add.1) and the information on the status of the DTP work, the GRPE Chair concluded indicating that the adoption of the UN GTR will conclude the first stage of phase I, while the second stage will result in an amendment of the UN GTR.

19. GRPE agreed that the work plan shall include the adoption of the UN GTR in the extraordinary GRPE session of November 2013. The start of the work on the first UN GTR amendment shall take place right after the UN GTR adoption and after the approval, by AC3, of a request by the co-sponsors for a mandate to develop it under the WLTP informal working group. GRPE stressed the need to define, in part A of the regulatory text, which parts of the work will be tackled in stage 2 of phase I, and agreed that: (i) part A shall be distributed at the end of July 2013 and included in the working document submitted in August 2013; and (ii) the technical report shall be submitted, as an informal document, in November 2013. In case of adoption by GRPE, both these documents can then be considered as working documents by WP.29 in March 2014.

21. GRPE acknowledged the work progress.

23. The expert from OICA suggested postponing the approval of ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/11 (and related modifications, including those contained in GRPE-66-32, concerning requirements for daytime running lamps and clerical errors) due to the potential confusion caused by the forthcoming amendments to the Euro 6 regulatory texts.

24. The experts from Germany and the Netherlands supported the approach suggested by OICA. The expert from Germany also stated that the Euro 6 requirements concerning vehicles using a mixture of hydrogen and natural gas as fuel shall follow the introduction of safety-related requirements. The expert from the EC clarified that, in the European Union, setting the emission requirements does not lead to the possibility to type approve the whole vehicle, since this will only be feasible once the safety provisions are defined and adopted. Following the warning of the expert from OICA about the absence of whole vehicle type approval requirements in the UN regulatory framework, he added that, if deemed necessary, the introduction of emission requirements for vehicles using a mixture of hydrogen and natural gas as fuel in UN Regulation No. 83 could be reconsidered.

25. GRPE agreed that all modifications introduced in the current session of GRPE to ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/11, as well as those emerging from the discussion scheduled for July 2013 in the European Union framework and other eventual changes, shall be incorporated in a new working document that will be submitted for the January 2014 session of GRPE.

32. Focusing on the issue of CO2 emission measurement (which is part of the HDH mandate), and having considered that Contracting Parties have their own regional heavy duty CO2 regulations in place, he reported that the informal working group will develop a procedure for CO2 determination in a way that will allow its use as an input for the regional CO2 regulations, if needed. GRPE agreed with the approach outlined by the HDH Chair.

33. Following a request from the expert from Korea on the status of the CO2 emission regulation on heavy duty vehicles in the European Union, GRPE invited the expert from the EC to provide an update in the next ordinary GRPE session, in January 2014.

47. Building on the presentation contained in GRPE-66-21-Rev.1, the PMP Chair summarized a proposal containing the terms of reference for the activities of the group (GRPE-66-30) and presented an overview of the related work programme. He explained that the scope of the terms of reference was intentionally kept as wide as possible (for example, non-exhaust particle emissions were also included) while the proposed work programme was limited to the items that were deemed to have the highest priority. The mandate for the work of the group on Particle Measurement Programme should be completed by June 2017. He added that addressing emerging issues such as the development and validation of new test procedures (such as particle number measurement systems compatible with Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS)) and the consideration of issues like tyre/brake wear would require an extension of it.

48. The expert from India asked about the possibility to consider engines running on gaseous and blended fuels. The PMP Chair clarified that emissions from all engines types are already within the PMP group scope. Replying to a second question, on the possibility to analyse the particle nature and their danger for health, the PMP Chair explained that tackling these tasks would require not only specific equipment and expertise, but would also involve significant scientific challenges. Responding to comments and questions by the Russian Federation and CLEPA on tyre and brake wear, he confirmed that, even if these subjects were within the PMP scope, the current activities could concentrate mainly on early steps like a literature review.

49. GRPE acknowledged the work progress and approved the updated PMP terms of reference, as reproduced in Annex V, confirming the broad definition of the scope and agreeing with the priorities proposed by the PMP Chair, understanding that work cannot be conducted, at the same time, on all the issues.

26. The expert from OICA introduced GRPE-66-16, containing a proposal to amend the 06 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 83 in order to align the emission requirements for social needs vehicles (currently based on M vehicles) with those enforced in the European Union (also contemplating N1, class 3 limits).

27. GRPE requested the secretariat to distribute GRPE-66-16 as an official document for consideration at the GRPE session of January 2014.

37. The Chair of the informal group on Gaseous Fuelled Vehicles (GFV) introduced: (i) ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/7, a proposal to amend the 05 series of amendments of UN Regulation No. 49 to extend the Euro V pollutant emission requirements to dual-fuel heavy duty engines and vehicles; and (ii) GRPE-66-25 (presented concisely in GRPE-66-39), a revision of the calculation methods also in use for the Euro VI dual-fuel engines, an update of hydrocarbon emission limits and some editorial modifications.

28. Presenting GRPE-66-22, the expert from the EC explained that the implementation of the Euro 6 legislation also justifies the proposals (contained in ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/9 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/10, respectively) to amend UN Regulations Nos. 101 and 103.

29. The expert from OICA introduced GRPE-66-17, explaining that it contains modifications to ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/9 and additional amendments to the 01 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 101 regarding the requirement for daytime running lamps and the fuel consumption of fuel cell vehicles.

30. GRPE adopted ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/9, as amended by GRPE-66-17, and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/10, not amended. GRPE requested the secretariat to submit the adopted proposals to WP.29 and AC.1, for consideration at their November 2013 sessions, respectively as Supplement 3 to the 01 series of amendments to Regulation No. 101 and Supplement 4 to the 00 series of amendments to Regulation No. 103.

41. GRPE did not receive any new proposal to amend UN GTRs Nos. 4, 5 and 10.

44. GRPE did not receive any new proposal to amend UN Regulation No. 85.

38. The expert from the EC introduced ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/8 and GRPE-66-10, containing modifications to the 06 series of amendments of UN Regulation No. 49 that aim to reduce the risks of misinterpretations of the regulatory text.

39. The expert from OICA presented GRPE-66-35-Rev.1, introducing the possibility to temporarily disable the OBD system for very low temperatures (first suggesting -18°C as a threshold, and later agreeing to use -22°C), arguing that only a fraction of vehicle km are run in these conditions and that the accuracy of the OBD devices is hampered at very low temperatures. Notwithstanding the need to ensure that the regulation of pollutant emission needs to be enforced also in the coldest regions and cities, the expert from Sweden accepted the proposal with a -22°C threshold. The expert from Norway supported the Swedish statement. The expert from the EC also supported the Swedish position, underlining that the deactivation shall be limited to the period of time during which the temperatures remain below the deactivation threshold.

40. GRPE adopted ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/7, as amended by GRPE-66-25, and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2013/8, as amended by GRPE-66-10 and GRPE-66-35-Rev.1. GRPE requested the secretariat to submit the resulting proposals to WP.29 and AC.1, for consideration at their November 2013 sessions, respectively as Supplement 6 to the 05 series of amendments to Regulation No. 49 and Supplement 2 to the 06 series of amendments to Regulation No. 49.

50. The Chair of the informal group on GFV reported on the work progress made by the group (GRPE-66-26). He explained that the work of the Heavy Duty Dual-Fuel Task Force (HDDF TF) focused on the proposals discussed under agenda items 4(c) (UN Regulation No. 49). The GFV group also developed the proposals discussed under agenda item 5 (UN Regulation No. 115) and the request by the Working Party on General Safety (GRSG) to GRPE to review, with respect to environmental issues, the proposal to amend UN Regulation No. 110 (specific equipment for CNG/LNG) adopted at its 104th session (GRPE-66-05). He explained that forthcoming work of the GFV group will be aimed to develop a new UN Regulation for heavy duty dual-fuel retrofit.

51. Focusing on the GRSG request, the GFV Chair briefly introduced GRPE-66-20 and GRPE-66-27, prepared by the Liquefied Natural Gas Task Force (LNG-TF). The documents contain information on environmental aspects underlying the GRSG request to GRPE concerned the issue of venting Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) into the atmosphere.

52. The expert from Italy supported the proposal to develop a new UN Regulation for heavy-duty dual-fuel retrofit. The expert from OICA underlined the need to make sure that the scope of this new UN Regulation is restricted, initially, to heavy duty road vehicles and diesel-gas fuels. The possibility to broaden its boundaries (e.g. to non-road mobile machinery) shall be explored at a later stage.

53. GRPE acknowledged the progress made by the group, endorsed its proposal to develop a new UN Regulation for heavy-duty dual-fuel retrofit, and, considering the GRSG request, agreed that no regulatory action with respect to the environmental issues shall be taken. GRSG will be informed through the GRPE report.

42. The GFV Chair illustrated a proposal to amend UN Regulation No. 115 (GRPE-66-19), correcting an error and aligning its provision to the corresponding ones in UN Regulation No. 83. Given the nature of the amendment, the expert from Italy suggested submitting the proposal, on an exceptional basis, directly to WP.29.

43. GRPE asked the secretariat to submit GRPE-66-19, as reproduced in Annex IV, as a working document directly to WP.29 and AC.1, for consideration at their November 2013 sessions, as Supplement 6 to UN Regulation No. 115.

54. The Chair of the EPPR group introduced GRPE-66-11, updating the terms of reference and rules of procedure of the informal group considered by GRPE in January 2013, aiming for an approval. Presenting GRPE-66-31, he outlined the main areas of work, provided information on the ongoing discussions taking place in recent meetings, and illustrated a draft road map sketching the work of the group in the forthcoming months. Having underlined that the work address issues both under the 1998 and the 1958 agreement, he mentioned that evaporative emissions, OBD requirements and tailpipe emissions are the first priorities to be considered by the group.

55. The EPPR Chair introduced GRPE-66-12, containing the request for a mandate to amend UN GTR No. 2 and to develop new UN GTRs and UN Regulations in the area of Environmental and Propulsion Performance Requirements (EPPR) for light vehicles. He explained that this follows the ongoing revision of environmental and propulsion performance requirements for the type approval of L-category vehicles in the European Commission and aims to increase global harmonization on the subject.

56. Answering to the question raised by IMMA on the need for mandate to develop new UN GTRs, the EPPR Chair suggested following the same route undertaken for the UN GTR development, as in the case of OBD. Responding to a request for clarifications by the expert from Italy on the intentions of the EPPR group on vehicle classifications and the extension to mopeds of the WMTC, the EPPR Chair confirmed that there is an intention to redefine classifications and the scope of UN GTR No. 2, adding that detailed decisions on these subject require further discussions with interested stakeholders.

57. GRPE approved the updated EPPR terms of reference, as reproduced in Annex VI of the GRPE meeting report. GRPE also considered GRPE-66-12, supporting its submission for consideration by WP.29 and AC.3 in their next session and endorsing the request for a mandate to amend UN GTR No. 2, to develop new UN GTRs (if necessary), and to amend and/or develop UN Regulations.

75. The expert from Korea introduced GRPE-66-03, containing a proposal to develop a new UN GTR on Vehicles Indoor Air Quality (VIAQ), in order to secure consumers’ health and safe driving environment against harmful substances, minimizing emission of the harmful substances upon manufacturing vehicles. The proposal was supported by a presentation (GRPE-66-40) on recent research on the subject.

76. The expert from the USA expressed his interest in the proposal. Answering specific questions from the experts from the USA and the Russian Federation, the expert from Korea clarified that the tests for vehicle indoor air quality were carried out on new vehicles and in laboratory conditions.

77. GRPE agreed to report on this proposal to WP.29 in June 2013. GRPE also recalled that the requests for mandates to amend and/or develop UN GTRs shall be submitted directly by contracting parties to WP.29 and AC.3, inviting Korea to do so.

78. The secretariat introduced GRPE-66-09-Rev.1, a revised draft paper looking at diesel vehicles and engines in the context of air quality, impacts of the emission of pollutants on the environment and health. The secretariat explained that the paper, based on GRPE-65-05, incorporates the comments received by the end of March 2013, as agreed during the GRPE session of January 2013. In particular, it includes an update of information related with WP.29 activities, a reorganization of the contents to improve the presentation of the policy discussion, an extension of the geographical scope to include information on North America and Japan, and the inclusion of conclusions and recommendations.

79. Canada, the Russian Federation and OICA welcomed the improvements in the document. A number of comments were addressed to the secretariat by these delegations and Euromot. They concerned the importance of fuel quality as enabler of cleaner vehicle technologies, the opportunity to consider particulate emissions from tyres, the need to update the information on the PMP activities – taking into account the updated scope of the PMP group, the correction of specific statements, as well as other issues addressing the WHO decisions. Having reiterated the need to restrict the paper to technical matters without questioning the WHO conclusions, the secretariat welcomed the comments and invited interested stakeholders to provide constructive contributions in a written form within a week, in order to have the time to include them in an updated version of the document for consideration by WP.29 in its June 2013 session. The GRPE Chair underlined the need to make sure that the comments provide constructive contributions to improve the paper. The expert from Germany supported the inclusion of a recommendation concerning cleaner fuels as enablers of technologies allowing the emission mitigation.

80. GRPE supported the document. Taking into account of the tight schedule needed for the consideration of the document in the UN framework, GRPE agreed that the secretariat should submit an updated version of the document to WP.29 for consideration at its next session (June 2013), taking into account the comments that will be received.

World Forum for the Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations | Session 160 | 25-28 Jun 2013

22. The World Forum noted the final draft (WP.29-160-15) of the design principles for control systems for Advanced Diver Assistance Systems (ADAS), which included the comments received by GRE (WP.29-160-03), GRSG (WP.29-160-10), GRB and GRSP (WP.29-160-23) and GRRF (WP.29-160-24). The World Forum adopted WP.29-160-15 with the modifications indicated below. WP.29 agreed to transmit it to the Working Party on Road Safety (WP.1). It was also agreed that the World Forum would decide, at its next session, how the adopted design principles would be published, either as an annex to R.E.3 and to S.R.1 or as a final document.

  Throughout the text for “minimum [provisions/recommendations]” read “main recommendations”.

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26. The Secretary reported that ITC had approved guidelines for the biennial evaluation and the programme of work (ECE/TRANS/2010/10/Rev.1, ECE/TRANS/2012/9/Rev.1). On the basis of these documents, he had prepared the biennial evaluation and the programme of work of the World Forum (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/5 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/38). WP.29 agreed in general with the proposals and requested the secretariat to update both documents with the decisions taken during the current session and those expected for the November 2013 session. WP.29 noted that the biennial evaluation and the programme of work should be transmitted to the Inland Transport Committee (ITC) for final approval.

27. The World Forum recalled the oral report of the Chair of GRSP given during the 159th session (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1102, paras. 23–27) and approved the report.

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28. The World Forum recalled the oral report of the Chair of GRPE given during the 159th session (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1102, paras. 28-34) and approved the report.

29. The World Forum recalled the oral report of the Chair of GRB given during the 159th session (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1102, paras. 35-37) and approved the report.

Proposal adopted.

Proposal adopted.

Proposal adopted.

64. The World Forum considered the draft amendments under agenda items 4.6.1 to 4.6.6 and recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting.

Proposal adopted.

Proposal adopted.

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103. Submitted for consideration and vote, the proposed Amendment 1 to UN Global Technical Regulation (UN GTR) No. 12 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/34, Amend.1, and Amend.1/Corr.1) was established in the UN Global Registry on 27 June 2013 by consensus vote of the following Contracting Parties present and voting: Australia, Canada, China, European Union (voting for Cyprus, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom), India, Japan, Norway, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, South Africa, Turkey and United States of America.

104. The technical report (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/35) and the adopted proposal for the development of the UN GTR (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/AC.3/35) will be appended to the established amendment to the UN GTR.

98. Submitted for consideration and vote, the proposed draft UN Global Technical Regulation (UN GTR) (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/41) was established in the UN Global Registry on 27 June 2013 by consensus vote of the following Contracting Parties present and voting: Australia, Canada, China, European Union (voting for Cyprus, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom), India, Japan, Norway, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, South Africa, Turkey and United States of America.

99. The technical report (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/42) and the adopted proposal for the development of the UN GTR (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/AC.3/17) will be appended to the established UN GTR.

30. The World Forum recalled the oral report of the Chair of GRRF given during the 159th session (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1102, paras. 38-42) and approved the report.

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69. The World Forum considered the draft corrigendum under agenda item 4.10.1 and recommended its submission to AC.1 for voting.

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72. The World Forum agreed that the draft Regulation on recyclability under agenda item 4.13.1 would be reconsidered, at its November 2013 session, for a possible adoption. It was noted that the amendments to the draft Regulation included in informal document GRPE-66-41 needed to be reviewed by the Contracting Parties. The representative of EU confirmed that the draft proposal (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/50) as amended by GRPE-66-41 is also acceptable for the EU. The secretariat was requested to consolidate both documents for consideration and voting at the November 2013 session.

66. The World Forum considered the draft amendments under agenda item 4.8.1 and recommended its submission to AC.1 for voting, subject to the correction mentioned in para. 67 below.

67. Agenda item 4.8.1, Regulation No. 117, document ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/55, add at the end:

Annex 4, the title, insert the reference to footnote 1 and footnote 1, to read:
1 The specifications for the test site reproduced in this annex are valid until the end of the period indicated in paragraph 12.9.”

74. The representative of the Russian Federation gave a presentation (WP.29-160-35) justifying the proposal for a new UN Regulation on e-call systems (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/67). The representative of EU informed WP.29 that the European Commission had presented a proposal to develop a regulation on this matter. He welcomed the idea to develop an international regulation in this area. He suggested that GRSG be in charge of the development of such a Regulation, to be annexed to the 1958 Agreement, and supported the establishment on an IWG. The representative of the United Kingdom expressed his willingness to support this initiative, but stated that the provisions of the UN Regulation should be technologically neutral to allow innovation. The delegation of Japan stated that, although his country was in the research phase, he supported the observations made by the representative of the United Kingdom and added that the solutions should be applicable worldwide.

75. The representative of OICA noted that various countries and regions had already expressed interest for emergency call systems. Therefore, OICA generally welcomes any effort to reach harmonized provisions in the framework of the 1958 Agreement, including a detailed analysis of the appropriate scope and technical requirements by an expert group, taking also into account that a number of the technical specifications and test procedures needed to be developed. He added that OICA was prepared to actively contribute to the development of the UN Regulation as proposed by the Russian Federation. He pointed out that other stakeholders needed to be consulted, since not only motor vehicles are involved. Finally, he invited Contracting Parties to review and possibly adapt their regulatory plans to avoid the introduction of non-harmonized specifications and stressed the urgency to finalize the UN Regulation.

76. WP.29 agreed that GRSG should develop the new UN Regulation and, given the time constraints, authorized that an IWG on automatic emergency call system start work on this subject under the chairmanship of the Russian Federation, Mr. Denis Zagarin (e-mail: Zagarin@autorc.ru). WP.29 invited all interested experts to inform Mr. Kaganov (Deputy Director of Department, Ministry of Industry and Trade, Russian Federation) (e-mail: Kaganov@minprom.gov.ru) on their interest and intention to participate in the IWG and to provide him detailed information on the subject as soon as possible.

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65. The World Forum considered the draft amendment under agenda item 4.7.1 and recommended its submission to AC.1 for voting.

68. The World Forum considered the draft amendments under agenda items 4.9.1 to 4.9.3 and 4.9.5 and recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting. The proposal under agenda item 4.9.4 should be considered at the November 2013 session.

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The proposal under agenda item 4.9.4 should be considered at the November 2013 session.

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70. The World Forum considered the draft corrigenda under agenda items 4.11.1 and 4.11.2 and recommended their submission to AC.1 for voting.

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71. The World Forum considered the draft corrigendum under agenda item 4.12.1 and recommended its submission to AC.1 for voting.

[The World Forum agreed to keep this proposal on the agenda for consideration at its November 2013 session.]

[The World Forum agreed to keep this proposal on the agenda for consideration at its November 2013 session.]

[The World Forum agreed to keep this proposal on the agenda for consideration at its November 2013 session pending reconfirmation of the proposed limit values by GRRF at its September 2013 session.]

78. The World Forum noted the consolidated document containing the status of the Agreement (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1073/Rev.7) as well as the status of priorities of the 1998 Agreement and items on which the exchange of views should continue (WP.29-160-04). The secretariat encouraged the Contracting Parties to send, in due time, their status reports and final reports on the progress of transposition of the UN GTRs into domestic law. The World Forum noted that the monitoring of the 1998 Agreement would be considered under agenda item 20 (see paras. 96 and 97 below).

79. The World Forum agreed that agenda items 5.2 to 5.5 should be considered by the Executive Committee AC.3.

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82. The representative of Italy, Chair of GRSG, informed the World Forum that his group had endorsed two corrigenda to the draft amendments of UN Rules Nos. 1 and 2, respectively WP.29-160-11 to ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/64 (UN Rule No. 1–environment) and WP.29-160-12 to ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/32 (UN Rule No. 2–roadworthiness). The representative of the United Kingdom, Chair of GRRF, recalled that his group recommended deferring the adoption of the amendment to UN Rule No. 2 awaiting the final revision of the corresponding EU Directive 2010/48/EU to fully harmonize them. The representative of the Russian Federation noted that other GRs endorsed, in principle, the two proposals. He volunteered to update them in cooperation with CITA and other CPs to the Agreement, integrating the comments received.

84. Referring to WP.29-160-19-Rev.1, the secretariat informed the World Forum on the emissions of air pollutants due to vehicles and engines, focusing on diesel exhaust emissions and providing an overview of the WP.29 activities carried out in this field. Following a recommendation by WP.29 in November 2012, GRPE had considered earlier versions of this document in January and June 2013. The secretariat clarified that WP.29-160-19-Rev.1 incorporates and addresses additional comments received after the June 2013 session of GRPE. The GRPE Chair supported the document. The World Forum endorsed WP.29-160-19-Rev.1 and agreed that the document should become part of the contribution of the Transport Division to the UNECE position on diesel exhaust emissions.

85. The Secretary of the Working Party on Road Safety (WP.1) informed the World Forum that his group continued considering WP.29 proposals to amend the 1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic in view of aligning its provisions with those of the vehicle regulations developed in the framework of the 1958 and 1998 Agreements. Referring to Annex V to the Convention, he added that WP.1 would consider an updated version of ECE/TRANS/WP.1/2011/4/Rev.1 at its September 2013 session. He expected that WP.1 would continue consideration of the requirement specifying that “every driver shall at all
times be able to control his vehicle” as well as the “Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS)” definition on the basis of ECE/TRANS/WP.1/2012/8 and the documents submitted by Germany (WP.29-160-31) and by Belgium, France, Italy, Sweden and the United States (WP.29-160-32). The latter contained the result of the discussion of the WP.1 informal expert group. The representative of OICA introduced a proposal (WP.29-160-16) on the subject of the driver’s control, converging in principle with WP.29-160-31. Therefore, the World Forum invited the representatives of Germany and OICA to submit a joint proposal for consideration at the September 2013 session of WP.1.

86. WP.29 noted the agenda of the meeting of the IWG (WP.29-160-28) scheduled to be held in the afternoon of 27 June 2013.

87. The secretariat introduced the terms of reference (WP.29-160-06) and the draft self-evaluation on the activities of the Vehicle Regulations and Transport Innovations Section of the UNECE Transport Division servicing the World Forum, covering the period January 2012–30 June 2013 (WP.29-160-07). WP.29 congratulated the secretariat for the detailed self-evaluation and approved it. The World Forum requested the secretariat to annex the adopted self-evaluation document to the session report as an addendum.

88. The representative of the Republic of Korea reported on the results of the twenty-third Enhanced Safety of Vehicles (ESV) Conference held in Seoul from 27 to 30 May 2013. The theme of the Conference was research collaboration to benefit safety of all users. Details of the Conference results are in WP.29-160-25. He informed WP.29 that the next ESV Conference would be hosted by Sweden from 8–11 June 2015 in Goteborg. The Chair offered the cooperation of WP.29 representatives for the preparation of this Conference.

89. WP.29 considered and adopted the proposal by GRPE for Amendment 4 to R.E.3 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/52) and requested the secretariat to publish it. WP.29 noted ECE/TRANS/WP.29/78/Rev.2/Amend.3 updating the list of Contracting Parties to the 1958 Agreement as well as their corresponding E symbols.

95. The thirty-eighth session of the Executive Committee (AC.3) was held on 27 June 2013. The representatives of 12 of the 33 Contracting Parties to the Agreement attended or were represented.

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100. The representative of the United Kingdom, Chair of the IWG on the UN GTR on Tyres, informed AC.3 that five questions were still unresolved. He confirmed that two Contracting Parties were still in the process of reviewing the text of the draft UN GTR. Referring to the final report on the development of the UN GTR (WP.29-160-09), he stated that, in the case of disagreement at the September 2013 session of GRRF, an optional test procedure should be included in addition to the two optional modules.

101. The representative of EU stated that a really long list of controversial provisions had been solved by March 2013 and, due to the five remaining unresolved questions, the UN GTR could not be adopted during the current session. He urged the Contracting Parties to make an effort to solve the pending issues at the September 2013 session of GRRF, thus allowing for voting on the draft UN GTR at the November 2013 session of AC.3.

102. The secretariat was requested to distribute WP.29-160-09 with an official symbol for consideration at the November 2013 session of AC.3.

105. Submitted for consideration and vote, the proposed Amendment 1 to UN Global Technical Regulation (UN GTR) No. 2 (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/53) was established in the UN Global Registry on 27 June 2013 by consensus vote of the following Contracting Parties present and voting: Australia, Canada, China, European Union (voting for Cyprus, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom), India, Japan, Norway, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, South Africa, Turkey and United States of America.

106. The technical report (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/54) and the adopted proposal for the development of the UN GTR (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/AC.3/34) will be appended to the established amendment to the UN GTR.

130. The representative of the Republic of Korea presented WP.29-160-38 on including a new priority in the AC.3 programme of work for developing a new UN GTR on Vehicle Indoor Air Quality. Due to the lack of time, AC.3 agreed to continue consideration of this matter at its next session in November 2013.

126. Referring to the discussion on the draft UN GTR on Electric Vehicles, the Chair of GRPE (Germany) recalled that the mandate of the IWG on EVE did not foresee the drafting of a UN GTR, but the development of a regulatory reference guide on electric vehicle technologies. The representative of China supported this statement, adding that the regulatory reference guide was expected at the June 2014 session of GRPE. AC.3 agreed that future developments of the UN GTR would be possible, subject to a revised mandate. She mentioned that at the sixth meeting of the IWG the reference items to develop a UN GTR were discussed and invited interested parties to provide research data. Finally, she informed AC.3 that the seventh meeting of the IWG was scheduled in Beijing on 17 October 2013.

125. The United States representative informed AC.3 about the IWGs work progress. He clarified that the IWG believed that a main conclusion of its activity was that the WorldSID 50th percentile male dummy would be ready for incorporation into the PSI UN GTR as a reliable test tool.

124. No new information was provided for this agenda item.

123. No supplementary information was provided beyond agenda item 2.3 (see paras. 22 to 24 above).

122. No new information was provided for this agenda item.

120. The representative of the United States, Chair of the IWG on Quiet Road Transport Vehicles (QRTV), reported on the progress made by the group. He informed AC.3 that the third meeting of the group had been held at the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA) offices in Brussels on 16-18 April 2013. He added that the American expert had presented a complete proposal that covered many of the key elements necessary for mitigating the risks to pedestrians that quiet EV and hybrid electric vehicles present. A key part of that proposal (Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM)) was being contemplated by the United States for a minimum sound requirement. He added that the IWG had discussed several questions that car manufacturers had raised.

121. The representative of the United States added that the blind community had raised concerns on the perception of moving vehicles and had suggested solutions to allow precautionary measures to protect themselves. He added that industry had argued that it was not possible to determine the influence of background noise during a test run and those heavy vehicles and motorcycles might be excluded by the scope of the QRTV IWG. He finally announced that the next meeting would take place at the US Department of Transportation (DOT), NHTSA Head Quarter in Washington, D.C. on 16-18 July 2013.

117. The representative of Japan, Secretary of the IWG on electric vehicle safety (EVS), informed AC.3 that the group had agreed on an outline of the draft UN GTR to address all safety issues. He added that two options were considered: (i) a two-step approach or (ii) a single step approach on the road map to have a comprehensive UN GTR covering a broader range of technologies. He finally announced that a draft road map would be provided at the November 2013 session of AC.3.

118. The representative of EU stated that further research was still needed in the field of the safety of batteries. The representative of OICA stated that, in view of the growing importance of new propulsion systems, in particular electric vehicles, OICA strongly supported the development of a UN GTR on Electric Vehicle Safety as currently conducted by the IWG. He stated that, while the goal was to complete the development of the GTR by the end of 2014, some Contracting Parties were in the process of conducting further research, and consequently feared that this would compromise the timely completion of all the work. Therefore, OICA had proposed a two-step approach, with a quick completion of the GTR in step 1, using the available work, knowledge and experience gained from the development of UN Regulation No. 100 under the 1958 Agreement. The UN GTR could then be further developed in step 2 on the basis of the research currently conducted in some Contracting Parties on issues that they consider as insufficiently addressed in step 1. He asked for a renewed commitment by all parties to complete the work before the end of 2014 and to agree on a two-step approach, if necessary. The representative of Italy agreed with a two-step approach.

119. AC.3 agreed to resume discussion on this subject on the basis of a progress report and timeline plan drafted by the IWG on EVS.

115. The representative of Australia, Chair of the IWG, informed AC.3 that GRSP at its May 2013 session had recommended the draft UN GTR and the final report (see Annex 2 of ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRSP/53) for adoption by AC.3 at its November 2013 session. He clarified that the draft UN GTR (WP.29-160-14) was submitted to the current session of AC.3 to initiate consideration for voting at the next session. Accordingly, he encouraged AC.3 representatives to undertake all preparations necessary to ensure a unanimous vote for the establishment of the UN GTR at the November 2013 session. He informed AC.3 that his country had already initiated the task of transposing the UN GTR into a UN Regulation, pending clarification from GRSP in December 2013, whether the UN GTR would be part of an amendment to UN Regulation No. 95 or a new UN Regulation.

116. The representative of Australia informed AC.3 (see para. 44 of this report), that the secretariat had prepared WP.29-160-36-Rev.1 amending the draft UN GTR, suggesting the removal of ISO references and other related changes, and recommended its adoption. AC.3 requested the secretariat to distribute WP.29-160-14 with an official symbol at its November 2013 session for consideration and vote, as amended by WP.29-160-36-Rev.1.

114. The Chair of GRPE (Germany) reported on behalf of the other two co-sponsors (Japan and European Union) on the development of the WLTP UN GTR. He added that work was progressing successfully, and that GRPE had considered the draft GTR on the basis of an informal document (GRPE-66-02) at its June 2013 session. He said that the subgroup for the development of the test procedure (DTP) was still working on some of the open issues and that the drafting group would further work on improvements of the text of the UN GTR until the deadline for submission of the working document by the end of August. He added that the technical report would be available, as an informal document, at the November session 2013 of GRPE. He mentioned that this approach had been agreed by the Contracting Parties in GRPE. AC.3 noted, that an adoption of the first version of the WLTP UN GTR was expected at the extraordinary GRPE session in November 2013 and finally at the session of AC.3 in March 2014.

113. The representative of OICA indicated that Phase 2 of the UN GTR should still address some open issues such as electric safety. The representative of EU announced that actions were already underway at the European level for the effective transposition of the UN GTR in the EU. The representative of Germany confirmed his intention to step down as project manager of the IWG on HFCV activities and clarified that only the safety part would need a road map for further development. The representative of China requested an increase in the number of technical sponsors for developing Phase 2 of the UN GTR. The representative of the United States of America requested that the consideration of new Terms of Reference for the IWG, sponsors and the way forward be included in the agenda of the next session of AC.3. AC.3 finally agreed to resume consideration on this subject at its November 2013 session.

112. The representative of Japan, Vice-Chair of the IWG on Phase 2 of UN GTR No. 9, introduced the fourth progress report of the group (WP.29-160-13) together with a presentation (WP.29-160-37). He explained that the IWG had made good progress and that an official proposal for incorporating the flexible pedestrian legform impactor would be submitted to the December 2013 session of GRSP. AC.3 adopted the fourth progress report and requested the secretariat to distribute it with an official symbol at its November 2013 session.

111. The representative of the United Kingdom, on behalf of the Chair of the IWG on UN GTR No. 7 Phase 2, gave an oral report on the work progress. He informed AC.3 that, as a result of its activities, the group had agreed on: (i) an effective head restraint height measurement procedure and (ii) an appropriate dynamic test, including the test procedure and the associated corridors for the Biofidelic Rear Impact Dummy (BioRID II). However, he added that the development of injury criteria for the use of the BioRID II was at a critical point, because medical research in the United States was still progressing but not as rapidly as was expected. As the deadline of the IWG is December 2013, he sought AC.3 guidance on whether the upcoming proposal of UN GTR could be delayed by more than one year to encompass as a whole the two above-mentioned issues or to proceed in two steps: adopt (i) the measurement of height of head restraint and then (ii) the dynamic test procedure with the dummy and the associated injury criteria. AC.3 preferred to proceed in a one-step approach, to consider a complete proposal, including a draft Addendum to M.R.1 and agreed to extend the mandate of the IWG until the end of 2015.

110. The representative of EU reported that a drafting group for the work on UN GTR No. 4 had been established. He expected that GRPE would submit, at its January 2014 session, a draft amendment to UN GTR No. 4, including the draft report on the work undertaken. Consideration by WP.29 was foreseen for November 2014.

108. AC.3 noted that guidance was not requested.

38. The Chair of GRSG, Mr. Erario, informed WP.29 about the results achieved during the 104th session of GRSG (for more details see the report of the session ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRSG/83).

42. On behalf of Ms. Versailles, Chair of GRSP, the representative of the United States of America informed WP.29 about the results made by GRSP during its fifty-third session (for details see the session report ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRSP/53).

45. The Chair of GRPE reported on the results of the sixty-sixth session of GRPE (for details, see the report of the session ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/66).

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53. The World Forum noted that the update of the status of the 1958 Agreement and the list of modifications to ECE/TRANS/WP.29/343/Rev.21 were available on the WP.29 website. The secretariat informed the World Forum that an updated informal version of the status document would be available as soon as OLA issues the Depositary Notifications regarding the entry into force of the new Regulations and amendments to existing ones adopted at the November 2012 session.

56. The representative of France, chairing the IWG on IWVTA, reported on the outcome of the meetings held in Paris prior to the WP.29 session. On behalf of the Chair of the IWVTA subgroup on the 1958 Agreement, the representative of EU presented the status on the review of the revised 1958 Agreement (WP.29-160-27). He outlined that the main part of the Agreement would remain unchanged and highlighted the new elements of the revision. He announced the intention of the informal group to finalize, at its forthcoming session in September 2013, the draft Revision 3 of the Agreement for consideration by WP.29 at the November 2013 session. WP.29 noted that it would be proposed that the current text of the Agreement on self-certification would remain unchanged. The representative of the Russian Federation expressed concerns on the new safeguard in view of the lack of objective criteria.

57. The World Forum noted that some remaining open issues have still to be resolved by the IWG on IWVTA: (i) level of ambition with respect to the “substantial and editorial” amendments to the Agreement and (ii) the legal status of the so-called placeholder specifying the administrative and procedural provisions applicable to all UN Regulations annexed to the 1958 Agreement.

58. WP.29 urged the IWVTA subgroup on the 1958 Agreement to resolve the open issues and agreed to have a detailed discussion on this subject at the November 2013 session. In this respect, the Chair invited all interested delegates from the Contracting Parties to the Agreement to participate in the subgroup’s forthcoming meeting in September 2013.

62. WP.29 noted that this matter had been considered under agenda item 4.3.

63. The Chair of the IWG on DETA presented an interim report (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/65) and recalled that his group had concluded the first stage. WP.29 agreed on the need to establish the DETA database following the principles of the above-mentioned document, excluding those related to the Unique Identifier as well as all the questions related to the IWVTA and the UN Regulation No. 0, which would be considered instead by the IWG on IWVTA. The secretariat stated that the final decision for hosting the DETA server was still under consideration by UNECE.

129. The representative of Italy introduced a proposal to amend UN GTR No. 3 (WP.29-160-22) and offered to be the sponsor for this amendment. The representative of Canada raised concerns related to some new provisions to be incorporated in the amended UN GTR that could not be applied in a self-certification system. The representative of IMMA supported the proposal. AC.3 requested the secretariat to distribute WP.29-160-22 with an official symbol at its next session for a detailed consideration.

77. The World Forum agreed that the proposal for Supplement 3 to the 06 series of amendments to Regulation No. 48 (WP.29-160-21) should be considered at its November 2013 session and requested the secretariat to distribute it with an official symbol.

127. The representative of EU reported that the IWG on environmental and propulsion performance requirements (EPPR) for L-category vehicles had met three times before this session. He introduced WP.29-160-18 containing a request for a mandate to amend UN GTR No. 2 (including its scope and purpose, if necessary) and to develop one or more new UN GTRs within the terms of reference of the EPPR group. He stressed the importance of developing UN Regulations and UN GTRs as well as transposing them into domestic law.

128. The representative of IMMA expressed his support for this proposal. AC.3 requested the secretariat to distribute WP.29-160-18 with an official symbol at its next session for further consideration.

2. The Director of the Transport Division welcomed the representatives and presented the strategic orientation of the Division. She provided an outlook on the development of transport to 2020–2030 and the projected global increase of the middle class population, which would result in an increasing demand for individual mobility. She, therefore, welcomed the work done by the World Forum and encouraged the adoption of the UN GTR on Hydrogen and Fuel Cell vehicles as a sustainable solution to address these future needs. She reported on the outcome of the second UN Global Road Safety Week (6-12 May 2013, Geneva). She informed WP.29 about on-going activities to increase the safety at road/railway crossings, about cooperation with the insurance industry and, finally, welcomed the work of the World Forum on e-call systems.

3. Addressing especially the Asian delegations, the Director invited the representatives to attend the session of the Working Party on Road Safety (WP.1) in New Delhi on 4-6 December 2013. She added that WP.1 continues to address the real or perceived issue of “consistency”, i.e. relation between the provisions of the 1968 Vienna Conventions and the vehicle regulations developed in the framework of the 1958 and 1998 Agreements. She also reported on on-going activities in Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS). She recalled the workshop on “Intelligent transport systems in emerging markets” jointly organized by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) which will take place in the ITU Headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, on 27 June 2013. Finally, she underlined the importance of transport for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and that the World Forum representatives were invited to support the establishment of a Sustainable Development Goal on transport in the post 2015 process.

4. Mr. Pérez Cajilema, Deputy Secretary of Rail and Road Transportation, Ministry of Transport and Public Works, Ecuador informed WP.29 about the intention of his country to participate to the activities of the World Forum. He stated that his government had recently decided to undertake regulatory activities to increase vehicle safety on the basis of international regulations, including those developed by the World Forum. He, thus, indicated that his country would prioritize these initiatives, especially on passive and active safety. WP.29 welcomed the initiative and wished a fruitful collaboration in view of a possible accession to the Agreements under its responsibility.

5. Mr. Calleja-Crespo, Director General of DG Enterprise and Industry of the European Commission (EC), confirmed the commitment of the EC to contribute to the global and challenging tasks of the World Forum. He underlined the importance of the regulatory activities of WP.29 as a platform for gathering contributions from all countries worldwide, the automobile industry and many other stakeholders. He stated that a strong industry policy results in an enhanced competiveness and in a dynamic industry. He added that the industry, especially the automotive sector, had a strategic role to play to overcome crisis, by contributing to the economic growth and fostering employment. On the need for future mobility, he recalled the Cars 2020 strategy for a competitive and sustainable automotive industry in Europe based on the four pillars: innovative technologies, international cooperation, good skills and smart regulations. He added that in the latter one, WP.29 was at the centre of this strategy: providing worldwide harmonized regulations, integrating in a neutral way the technological development and better promoting the dialogue between countries and industry. He recognized the success of WP.29 through the past years, in anticipating regulatory needs such as regulations on Electric Vehicles as well as Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles. He underlined that future challenges would be of a higher complexity and that WP.29 is the proper forum to deliver a regulatory framework for technical solutions.

6. Mr. David Strickland, Administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), addressed the World Forum. He acknowledged the sustained international collaboration of all members of WP.29 and AC.3 as well as the expertise of its subsidiary Working Parties in the global harmonization of vehicle regulations involving safety, fuel efficiency, and environmental protection. He emphasized his organization’s commitment to the World Forum. He underscored the role of WP.29 in the development of the new draft UN GTR on hydrogen and fuel cell vehicles. Furthermore, he thanked both Germany and Japan for co-sponsoring the GTR with the United States of America as well as their industry for their contributions.

7. Closing his address, Mr. Strickland recognized the work done by the WP.29 secretariat and presented Mr. Ramos, Chief of the WP.29 secretariat, with a commemorative NHTSA award “in recognition of the outstanding contribution of the Secretariat of the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, to the advancement of global technical regulations for motor vehicle safety under the 1998 Global Agreement”. His presentation is reproduced in Annex I to this report. WP.29 representatives welcomed his remarks.

8. On behalf of the current and former members of the WP.29 secretariat, Mr. Ramos thanked Mr. Strickland for the appreciation and expressed the sustained commitment of the secretariat to serve the World Forum.

9. The provisional annotated agenda for the session (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1103, Adds.1–2) was adopted with the amendments noted below:

(a) Addition of agenda items:
4.16.WP.29-160-21Proposal for Supplement 3 to the 06 series of amendments to Regulation No. 48
8.8.Meeting of the Informal Working Group on UN lithium battery testing requirements
19.1.Proposal to develop amendments to gtr No. 2 (Worldwide Motorcycle emission Test Cycle (WMTC)
WP.29-160-18
19.2.Proposal to develop amendments to gtr No. 3 (Motorcycle brakes)
WP.29-160-22
(b) Addition and correction of document references for items:
2.3.WP.29-160-03Comments by GRs on WP.29-157-06, for GRs read GRE
2.5.add ECE/TRANS/2012/9/Rev.1 and ECE/TRANS/2012/10/Rev.1
4.5.add ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/65/Corr.1 (E only)
4.15.add ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/67
8.7.for Proposal for Amendment 5
read Proposal for Amendment 4 (twice)
add ECE/TRANS/WP.29/78/Rev.2/Amend.3
14.1.for ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2011/47
read ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2011/147
14.3.add ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/34/Amend.1/Corr.1
for ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2012/AC.3/35
read ECE/TRANS/WP.29/AC.3/35
14.4.for ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2012/AC.3/34
read ECE/TRANS/WP.29/AC.3/34

10. The list of informal documents is reproduced in Annex II to the session report.

11. The 112th session of WP.29/AC.2 was held on 24 June 2013, chaired by Mr. B. Gauvin (France) and was attended, in accordance to Rule 29 of the terms of reference and rules of procedure of WP.29 (TRANS/WP.29/690 and Amends.1-2), by the Chairs of WP.29 (France), GRB (France), GRE (Canada), GRSP (United States of America), GRPE (Germany), GRRF (United Kingdom), GRSG (Italy), the Administrative/Executive Committees of the three agreements administered by WP.29 (France, Russian Federation and the United States of America), by the representatives of the European Union, Japan and the United States of America and by the Vice-Chairs of WP.29 (Russian Federation), GRSG (Hungary) and GRSP (Republic of Korea).

12. The Committee reviewed the provisional agenda of the 160th session of the World Forum and recommended the amendments as indicated in para. 9 above. The Committee also recommended that agenda item 5.1 be considered by the World Forum and that the rest of the agenda items regarding the 1998 Agreement be considered by the Executive Committee of the 1998 Agreement (AC.3). It was also recommended that the Administrative Committee of the 1997 Agreement (AC.4) not hold its session. WP.29/AC.2 reviewed the draft agenda for the 161st session of the World Forum, scheduled to be held in Geneva from 12 to 15 November 2013.

13. The Administrative Committee reconfirmed the recommendation made at the last sessions that a representative of the Russian Federation be proposed as Vice-Chair of GRB (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1099, para. 9). WP.29/AC.2 also noted that GRE did not have, at the moment, any candidates for Chair or Vice-Chair for 2014, and that efforts were being made to resolve the issue.

14. The Administrative Committee noted that the ECE had approved the revision of the ECE reform and invited the secretariat to report to the World Forum under agenda item 2.4 (see para. 25 below).

15. The Administrative Committee considered the guidelines and procedures for ECE bodies, and recommended continuing their detailed consideration at its next session in November 2013. AC.2 underlined the need of having well-experienced Chairs and Vice-Chairs to correctly fulfil the tasks of WP.29 and its subsidiary Working Parties.

16. The Administrative Committee considered a secretariat document on possible solutions for amendments to UN Regulations when there are several series of amendments simultaneously in force due to a long period of transitional provisions. It was noted that several similar amendments had been adopted on previous occasions (i.e. UN Regulations Nos. 48 (June 2012), 19, 48 and 94 (November 2011), 83 (November 2010) and 48 (March 2010)). The Committee also noted that the Office of Legal Affairs (OLA) had requested the secretariat to be sufficiently clear for the application of amendments to different series of amendments and requested a document for each amendment. AC.2 considered that a common position should be taken in all the GRs and recommended resuming consideration of this issue at its next session.

17. The Administrative Committee noted the intention of GRSP to submit an amendment to UN GTR No. 9 (Pedestrian safety) for Phase 1 and another amendment for Phase 2 at the same session of the Executive Committee of the 1998 Agreement (AC.3). WP.29/AC.2 was of the opinion that this procedure could be followed.

18. The representative of the Russian Federation introduced a document (WP.29-160-39) containing data on release of particulates by transport vehicles that included not only engine emissions, but also tyre wear and brake pads wear. The Committee recommended referring this document to GRPE for consideration by its IWG on Particulate Matter Programme (PMP) and to GRB and GRRF for information and requested the secretariat to take the necessary actions.

19. The Committee continued consideration of simplifying the insertion of provisions for granting revisions and extensions to type approvals in the UN Regulations. WP.29/AC.2 invited the Chairs of the GRs to find a common solution. As a result, the Chairs of the GRs suggested inserting the new provisions on revisions and extensions into the consolidated Resolution on the Construction of Vehicles (R.E.3) and referring in UN Regulations to that part of R.E.3.

20. The World Forum adopted the report of the Administrative Committee on its 112th session and its recommendations.

21. The World Forum noted the revised programme of work and documentation (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/1/Rev.1). WP.29 representatives were invited to review the document and to communicate to the secretariat any amendments deemed necessary. The secretariat presented the list of informal working groups of WP.29 and its subsidiary Working Parties (GRs) (WP.29-160-01). WP.29 agreed to fix 31 December 2015 as the expiry date of the groups not having an agreed upon date. The secretariat presented the draft calendar of sessions for the year 2014 (WP.29-160-02). The World Forum agreed with the proposal to modify the autumn session of GRSG (30 September–3 October 2014). It was noted that the proposed calendar should be confirmed by UNOG Conference Services.

25. The secretariat reported on the ECE session (9-11 April 2013). The World Forum noted with satisfaction that ECE had decided to reinforce the Transport Division with two professional (P) posts (one at P2 and one at P4 level) to work primarily for the secretariat of WP.29. The secretariat thanked the representatives of the World Forum for their support. WP.29 noted that the ECE report would be made available at the UNECE website.

59. The representative of Japan, chairing the IWVTA subgroup on the development of UN Regulation No. 0, reported on the work progress made by the group. He highlighted that the subgroup had been discussing, among others, three very important issues; obligation of CPs applying the UN Regulation No. 0 to apply all the UN Regulations listed in UN Regulation No. 0, right of the CPs to issue IWVTA if such CPs are not applying all the UN Regulations listed in UN Regulation No. 0, and the treatment of optional requirements in UN Regulations listed in UN Regulation No. 0 within the scope of IWVTA. He sought the advice of WP.29 on the principles of mutual recognition of IWVTAs granted by Contracting Parties applying the future UN Regulation No. 0, even if they do not apply all the UN Regulations listed in the annex of UN Regulation No. 0. Finally, he announced the subgroup’s intention to resume, at the forthcoming meeting in September 2013, its deliberation with a view to solve all the three issues in its session so that the subgroup could finalize a first proposal on UN Regulation No. 0 for consideration by WP.29 at its November 2013 session, and encouraged all CPs and potential new CPs to contribute to and participate in the next subgroup meeting.

60. Following further observations, it was agreed that a full discussion would be arranged at the next session of the World Forum and delegates were requested to consider the issue with their administrations in preparation to provide their views on this important topic.

61. The World Forum acknowledged the progress made by the IWVTA and its subgroups. The secretariat was requested to further clarify with the above-mentioned principles of rights and obligations of CPs applying the future UN Regulation No. 0.

1. The World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29) held its 160th session from 25–28 June 2013 chaired by Mr. B. Gauvin (France). The following countries were represented, following Rule 1(a) of the Rules of Procedure of WP.29 (TRANS/WP.29/690 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/690/Amend.1 and Amend.2):

AustraliaBelgiumBosnia and Herzegovina
CanadaChinaColombia
Czech RepublicEcuadorFinland
FranceGermanyHungary
IndiaIndonesiaItaly
JapanLatviaLuxembourg
MalaysiaNetherlandsNorway
Republic of KoreaRomaniaRussian Federation
SerbiaSlovakiaSouth Africa
SwitzerlandThailandTurkey
United Kingdom of Great Britain
and Northern Ireland
United States of AmericaViet Nam

Representatives of the European Union (EU) participated.

The following intergovernmental organization (IGOs) also participated: International Telecommunications Union (ITU).

The following nongovernmental organizations were also represented:
Association for Emission Control by Catalyst (AECC)
European Tyre and Rubber Manufacturers’ Association (ETRMA);
European Tyre and Rim Technical Organisation (ETRTO);
International Motor Vehicle Inspection Committee (CITA);
European Association of Automotive Suppliers (CLEPA/MEMA/JAPIA)2;
International Automotive Lighting and Light-Signalling Expert Group (GTB);
Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA);
Foundation for the Automobile and Society (FIA Foundation);
International Motorcycle Manufacturers Association (IMMA);
International Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers (OICA);
International Organization for Standardization (ISO);
Union of Technical Assistance for Motor Vehicle and Road Traffic (UNATAC).

23. The representative of ITU informed WP.29 about the upcoming joint ITU/UNECE workshop on “Intelligent transport Systems in emerging markets – drivers for safe and sustainable growth”, scheduled to be held on Wednesday 27 June 2013 at the ITU premises in Geneva. He underlined the importance of vehicle to vehicle communication systems in reducing a large proportion of road accidents as well as the relevance of driver distractions. Therefore, he encouraged cooperation among ITS stakeholders, ITU and the automotive industry. Moreover, he added that the use of mobile devices by drivers in moving vehicles creates risks of vehicle accidents; while mobile devices continued to increase in numbers and capabilities, this trend increased the risk of driver distraction issues in moving vehicles. He stated that ITU would expect that the issues of driver distraction by mobile devices be addressed by: (i) legal promulgations in various jurisdictions prohibiting certain actions by drivers with their mobile devices, (ii) regulations by various vehicle and mobile regulators to prescribe requirements for new vehicles and new mobile devices, and (iii) technical implementations to enforce legal prescriptions and regulations covering the use of mobile devices by drivers in moving vehicles. He expressed his wish for a fruitful cooperation with WP.29.

24. The representative of the United States informed the World Forum that his country had developed extensive research on vehicle to vehicle communication systems and that regulatory initiatives would likely follow. He introduced WP.29-160-34 on NHTSA’s driver distraction guidelines showing the serious consideration taken by his country to consider this issue. He concluded with appreciation for ITUs perspective and offered his cooperation. However, he underlined that developing solutions involving smart phone applications that prevent crashes fell within the framework of regulatory activities of vehicle safety regulators in his country. He also informed the World Forum about the status of potential national regulatory activities on automatic crash notification systems.

31. On behalf of Mr. Gorzkowski, Chair of GRE, the representative of Canada reported on the results of the sixty-ninth session of GRE (for details see the report of the session (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRE/69). He drew attention to the on-going discussion on new concepts of direction indicators with expanding apparent surfaces and the challenge to preserve uniformity and clarity of light signals.

32. [The GRE chair’s representative] informed WP.29 about the report made by the Secretary of WP.1 to GRE on the progress made by WP.1 in reviewing GREs proposal (adopted and submitted by WP.29 to WP.1 several sessions ago) to amend the 1968 Vienna Convention. WP.1 had finished the first reading of this proposal and would proceed to its second reading at its sixty-sixth session scheduled for September 2013.

33. [The GRE chair’s representative] announced that GRE had agreed to establish a Special Interest Group (SIG) to work on simplifying UN Regulations on lighting and light-signalling. The European Commission would chair the group and GTB would provide secretarial support. WP.29 endorsed this proposal.

34. [The GRE chair’s representative] confirmed that GRE fully endorsed the establishment of the electronic Database for the Exchange of Type Approval documentation (DETA) as this system would be essential for simplifying the marking provisions on lighting and light-signalling.

35. [The GRE chair’s representative] reported that GRE had proposed establishing an IWG to amend UN Regulation No. 86 on the installation of lighting and light-signalling devices for agricultural tractors to improve the conspicuity of such vehicles on public roads. The group would be co-chaired by Germany and the Netherlands. CEMA had volunteered for the secretariat functions. WP.29 endorsed the establishment of this IWG.

36. [The GRE chair’s representative] informed WP.29 that GRE had supported the proposals tabled by the Russian Federation amending UN Rules Nos. 1 and 2. He announced that GRE had endorsed the comments made by OICA on the guidelines for Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS).

37. Finally, [the representative of Canada] announced that Canada would no longer support the chairmanship of GRE. Therefore, GRE would need to find a Chair for 2014. The representative of EU acknowledged Mr. Gorzkowski’s valuable contributions and his successful chairmanship during the recent years on improving and simplifying UN Regulations on lighting and light-signalling.

39. [The chair of GRSG] added that several amendments concerning Regulations Nos. 67, 107 and 110, had been adopted and would be submitted to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their November 2013 sessions. In particular, he underlined the importance of the amendment to Regulation No. 110, which would allow the approval of vehicles using Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) in their propulsion system.

40. [The GRSG chair] also informed WP.29 about the on-going activities of the IWG on Plastic Glazing and requested the extension of its mandate until October 2014.

41. WP.29 noted the report of Mr. Erario and agreed to this extension.

43. [The representative of the GRSP chair] informed WP.29 that GRSP expected to recommend that Amendment 2 (Phase 2) of the UN GTR on pedestrian safety, aimed at including the Flex-PLI and the definition of the head form impact point be included into the UN GTR No. 9 test. These provisions would also be included into UN Regulation No. 127. He also announced the submission of an Amendment 1 (Phase 1) to the UN GTR on pedestrian safety on an updated definition of the head form impact point.

44. [The GRSP chair’s representative] informed the World Forum that GRSP had recommended a proposal and a final report to AC.3 for consideration and vote at its November 2013 session on the development of a UN GTR on pole side impact (PSI). However, he added that a parallel proposal for Addendum 2 to Mutual Resolution No. 1 (M.R.1) introducing drawings and specifications of the World Side Impact Dummy (WorldSID) 50th percentile male would be submitted at a later stage to GRSP and to WP.29 for adoption. Finally, he added that GRSP had agreed, as an interim solution, to reference these specifications to the pertinent website of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Accordingly, he sought the guidance of WP.29 and AC.3 on this subject and to find a solution for the location of the dummy specifications until the addendum to M.R.1. could be approved (see para. 116 below).

46. [The GRPE chair] reminded the World Forum about the extraordinary session of GRPE in November 2013 on finalizing the work on the UN GTR on the Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicles Test Procedure (WLTP).

47. [The GRPE chair] informed WP.29 that the terms of reference, timelines, and rules of procedures of the Particle Measurement Programme (PMP) and Environmental and Propulsion Performance Requirements (EPPR) for L-category vehicles informal working groups had been approved by GRPE and annexed to the GRPE report.

48. [The GRPE chair] added that GRPE had decided to develop a new UN Regulation for heavy-duty dual-fuel retrofit instead of amending UN Regulation No. 115.

49. [The GRPE chair] sought WP.29’s endorsement to extend the mandate of the IWG on Vehicle
Propulsion System Definitions (VPSD) until June 2014. WP.29 consented.

50. [The GRPE chair] announced the intention of the Republic of Korea to propose developing a new UN GTR on Vehicles Indoor Air Quality (VIAQ) for consideration by WP.29 and AC.3 (see paras. 130 below).

51. WP.29 noted that Mr. C. Albus (Germany) had been re-elected as Chair of GRPE for the sessions of 2014 and that Mr. S. Marathe, nominated by the government of India, had been re-elected as Vice-Chair.

52. The representative of the Russian Federation underlined the importance of atmospheric pollution in urban areas due to the emission particles caused by tyre use and brake wear. WP.29 endorsed the recommendation by WP.29/AC.2 (see para. 18 above).

54. The representative of the United Kingdom reminded the World Forum that GRRF had sought guidance about referencing private standards in UN Regulations, UN Global Technical Regulations and UN Rules. He stated that the non-availability of former and draft versions of such standards as well as the non-availability of the referenced standards free of charge, would affect the transparency of the regulations. He encouraged dialogue with major international standard organizations in addressing these issues. WP.29 shared these concerns.

55. The Chair of WP.29 requested the secretariat to contact the concerned organizations to consider this issue. He suggested that the Chair of ISO/TC 22 on Road vehicles should be involved in this process. WP.29 agreed to continue consideration of this matter at its November 2013 session.

73. The World Forum considered the pending proposals for amendments to existing Regulations under agenda items 4.14.1 to 4.14.3 and agreed to keep them on the agenda for consideration at its November 2013 session.

80. No new information was provided under this agenda item.

81. The World Forum noted the updated document on the status of the Agreement (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1074/Rev.4/Amend.1), including the status of the UN Rules annexed to the Agreement, the list of the Contracting Parties to the Agreement and of their Administrative Departments. WP.29 noted that the notifications regarding the Administrative Authorities and Technical Services were not sent by all the Contracting Parties (CPs) to the Agreement. Concerned CPs were invited to send these notifications to the secretariat at their earliest convenience.

83. No new information on the subject was given during the session.

90. Interested WP.29 representatives were invited to participate in the IWG meeting on UN lithium battery testing requirements, scheduled to be held in Washington, D.C. on 2–4 October 2013. More details about the meeting are available at the UNECE website. WP.29 representatives were informed that before registering for the meeting, they should get in touch with the Head of delegation of their country at the ECOSOC Sub-Committee. Upon request, the list of participants for the session of the ECOSOC Committee, with the head of delegations, could be obtained from the secretariat of the Transport of Dangerous Goods and Special Cargoes section. The secretariat was requested to transmit this information to the GRSP experts.

91. The World Forum adopted the report and its annexes on the basis of a draft prepared by the secretariat.

92. Of the 51 Contracting Parties to the Agreement, 38 were represented and established AC.1 for its fifty-fourth session held on 26 June 2013.

93. AC.1 invited Mr. B. Gauvin, Chair of WP.29, to chair the session.

96. AC.3 noted the information, as of 13 June 2013, regarding the status of the 1998 Agreement (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1073/Rev.7). It was noted that WP.29-160-29 and WP.29-160-30 updated the information of the United States and the Republic of Korea respectively. The representatives of the Contracting Parties were reminded of their obligation to send to the secretariat, the mandatory reports on the transposition process through their Permanent Missions in Geneva via the “1998 AGREEMENT-MISSIONS List” electronic system to ensure updating of the status document which is the monitoring tool of the Agreement. Assistance may be obtained from the secretariat (Mr. F. Guichard). It was indicated that WP.29-159-07 and WP.29-159-08 could be taken as examples of simplified ways to notify the information on the transposition of the UN GTRs into the national laws of the Parties.

107. AC.3 noted that no request was submitted for consideration.

109. AC.3 noted that this matter had been considered under agenda item 14.2 (see paras. 100–102 above).

131. No other business was raised.

132. Following the recommendation made by the Administrative Committee WP.29/AC.2 for the coordination of work, AC.4 did not hold its session (see para. 12 above).

133. No other business was raised.

Oral statement of the Honorable David Strickland before the Executive Committee (AC.3) of the 1998 Agreement

Thank you, Chairman, ladies and gentlemen. It is my honor and privilege to join you today at the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29). Before we proceed with today’s session of the Executive Committee of the 1998 Agreement and voting, it is my great pleasure to acknowledge the dedication and hard work of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicle GTR Working Group.

Your collective skills, knowledge, and efforts have enabled you to overcome extremely complex challenges and advance the important work of our community. Your contribution is a shining example of international collaboration at its very best. There is no doubt in my mind that sustained collaboration is the most powerful tool available to our global community for advancing our shared interest in harmonization, across all borders and among all nations.

Under the auspices of WP.29, we all benefit from the contributions of technical experts from all the contracting parties and from the industry-including automakers, component manufacturers, and safety standard experts. Our alliance is stronger and more effective because our member nations share data and science-based knowledge, rather than expending resources on efforts to develop standards and regulations individually.

In the broadest sense, research and data-sharing shape every aspect of vehicle innovation. At the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, I have seen the benefits of collaboration and transparency in our long-term work with research partners to increase fuel efficiency, enhance the crash-worthiness of vehicles, and advance both vehicle-tovehicle and vehicle-to infrastructure technologies.

Sharing data internationally is even more important now that many countries in the increasingly motorized world are seeing more vehicles on the road and a rise in highway fatalities and injuries. Through our work with the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum, I have been privileged to collaborate with representatives of most APEC member Economies in workshops designed to enable them to build a strong foundation of traffic safety, including data collection and analysis.

The commitment to share data, experience, ideas, and expertise is a powerful resource that is moving our international community toward many common goals, including the vital work to establish a comprehensive set of global technical vehicle regulations.

When fully realized, these regulations will help to inform and enable consumers throughout the world: In every country it will be clear that vehicles produced under the regulations are the most advanced in terms of safety, fuel efficiency, and environmental protection.

The hydrogen and fuel cell vehicle Global Technical Regulation, sponsored by Germany, Japan, and the United States is an excellent example of the power of collaboration. The hard work and cooperative spirit among contracting parties and industry have produced a GTR that is performance- and science-based, well-supported by excellent research, and grounded in credible scientific data. The GTR will advance development and international deployment of safe hydrogen and fuel cell vehicles, and ultimately enable our community to achieve its shared goals of decreasing our dependence on fossil fuel, reducing carbon emissions, and enabling clean, reliable power generation.

As you know, in the United States we have entered a transitional period which will bring new leadership to the Department of Transportation in the near future. I want to emphasize that during the transition and going forward that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration will remain fully and enthusiastically engaged in the vital work of WP.29.

It is my pleasure to extend special thanks to our co-sponsor nations, Germany and Japan, especially Mr. Christoph Albus, the Task Manager, and Mr. Kazuyuki Narusawa, the co-chair of the Informal Working Group, for their consistent and invaluable contributions.

But our work would not be complete without the hard work of another team: the UNECE WP.29 Secretariat. On a daily basis, this team of dedicated individuals provides their support and expertise to the meetings of all GRs and Working Groups. And when our work is done, theirs continues: They are the ones who format, edit, and translate the texts of every report and GTR.

It is now my pleasure and honor to acknowledge the enormous and important work that this relatively small team does with a small token of appreciation:

“In recognition of the outstanding contribution of the Secretariat of the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, to the advancement of global technical regulations for motor vehicle safety under the 1998 Global Agreement,” it is my honor to present this plaque to the WP.29 Secretariat.

Thank you."

97. The representative of EU provided an example of how the new UN GTR on Hydrogen and Fuel-cell vehicles, once adopted, would be transposed into EU legislation (WP.29-160-26): through a new UN Regulation annexed to the 1958 Agreement and amendments to UN Regulations Nos. 12, 94 and 95. He expected to conclude this process by the June 2014 session of WP.29 at the earliest. He announced that Annex 4 to the framework Directive 2007/47/EC would be modified accordingly.

Electric Vehicles and the Environment | Session 6 | 3 Jun 2013

The Chair thanked EVE members for their participation.

Mr. Michael Olechiw, Chair of the informal working group, welcomed participants to the meeting. There were approximately 50 participants in the room representing Contracting Parties, vehicle manufacturers and industry organizations from around the world. Ms. Chen Chunmei, Co-chair, and a few others participated in the meeting by conference call.

The Agenda for the meeting (EVE-06-02-Rev2e) was reviewed. Upon request from China, an additional agenda item (3) was added to discuss logistics for the upcoming EVE-07 meeting in Beijing. The revised and final Agenda for the meeting is document EVE-06-02-Rev3e.

The Secretary reviewed document EVE-05-15e covering Agenda item 2 with a focus on action items. The Secretary detailed which action items were completed or ongoing, including:

EVE-5 Action 1, ongoing: The Secretary continues to invite participants to present on standardization at the EVE IWG meetings.

EVE-5 Action 2, ongoing: The Secretary continues to coordinate input to the VPSD document from EVE IWG membership.

EVE-5 Action 3, completed: Participants were invited to submit any further comments to the Reference Guide Outline to the Secretary prior to the EVE-6 meeting.

EVE-5 Action 4, completed: Mr. Michael Olechiw provided further clarification on utility factors for California in response to a question by Mr. Kazuyuki Narusawa.

EVE-5 Action 5, completed: The Secretary invited the chairs of other IWGs to participate in a discussion on priorities for EVE at the EVE-6 meeting.

EVE-5 Action 6, ongoing: Mr. Stéphane Couroux continues to inquire on available EV test data in Canada.

EVE-5 Action 7, completed: The leadership committee discussed what information will be made available as part of the Reference Guide; participants were informed that questionnaire information submitted by contracting parties will not be made available.

EVE-5 Action 8, completed: The Secretary modified document EVE-04-06e (EVE IWG roadmap) to include deadlines for submitting draft and final versions of the Reference Guide to EVE IWG, GRPE and WP.29. The revised roadmap is EVE-06-03e.

EVE-5 Action 9, ongoing: Funding is secured by the US EPA to hire a consultant to support continued development of Reference Guide; the contracting process was nearly complete at the time of the EVE-6 meeting. Once a consultant is secured, drafting of the reference guide will begin.

EVE-5 Action 10, completed: The Secretary sought participation of volunteers to develop draft Reference Guide; OICA has planned to review the first draft. There were no other volunteers.

EVE-5 Action 11, completed: The Secretary posted and sent the EVE-6 agenda to EVE participants ahead of the meeting. The Secretary arranged for a conference call line at the EVE-6 meeting.

EVE-5 Action 12, completed: Ms. Chen Chunmei gave an overview of the EVE-7 meeting location and date during EVE-6 agenda item 3.

EVE-5 Action 13, completed: Participants were informed of the EVE-7 meeting date at
the EVE-6 meeting during agenda item 3.

ACTION 1: Mr. Michael Olechiw will provide updates on the contracting process to secure a consultant for Reference Guide drafting as needed.

The Secretary provided an update similar to that given at the EVE-5 meeting on the approval of the terms of reference by AC.3. The Secretary reminded participants that at the 158th session of the WP.29, held in November 2012, the AC.3/WP.29 requested that the Terms of Reference and a Progress Report for the EVE be presented at the 159th session, to be held in March 2013. The EVE Secretariat has submitted and obtained approval of documents GRPE-65-03 and GRPE-65-04 by GRPE in January 2013. The Terms of Reference were subsequently added to the GRPE 65th session report for presentation at AC.3. The GRPE report was, however, not submitted in time for presentation to AC.3 at the 159th session in March 2013 and will instead be considered at the 160th session in June.

It was confirmed that a member of the EVE leadership committee would present an update on the EVE IWG activities at the 160th WP.29 session, which the Secretary will help coordinate.

ACTION 4: The Secretary will coordinate with the EVE leadership committee who will present at the 160th WP.29 session and provide appropriate materials for the update.

Two EV information-sharing presentations were made during the EVE-6 meeting that overlapped with priority areas of interest identified by the group in Reference Guide development (EVE-06-04e).

First, Denis Naberezhnykh (Senior ITS Consultant, Sustainable Mobility Group, TRL, United Kingdom) presented on the impact of inductive charging of electric buses on the distribution network (EVE-06-06e). The presentation was well received and some follow-up questions were posed concerning practicality of plug-in charging, wireless charging during motion, and types of bus routes.

Second, Jean-Pol Wiaux (Director General, Recharge, The European Association for Advanced Rechargeable Batteries, Belgium) presented on Service Life Parameters of lithium ion batteries (EVE-06-05e). This presentation was also well received with a few follow-up questions concerning the impact of temperature of storage on range, costs, and battery chemistries.

ACTION 5: The Secretary will follow-up with Mr. Wiaux concerning cold temperature data for inclusion in Reference Guide analysis.

a. Report drafting progress

Timelines for the report drafting process were reviewed under item 6.c. Participants were informed under item 2 that at the time of the EVE-6 meeting a consultant was being hired to complete this work.

b. Discussion: Analysis of guide information in the context of conclusions and recommendations to the GRPE

Using document EVE-06-04e, EVE IWG Prioritization Discussion Points, the Chair informed participants that the intent of the document was to prioritize issues identified during the Reference Guide questionnaire completion phase that could be suitable for focusing the conclusions and recommended areas for future work in the Guide; such conclusions and recommendations could include the development of a gtr. Priority areas may also be used to identify where future EV testing and data gathering efforts could be focused.

The Chair sequentially went through each issue identified in the document, asking participants to provide comments and indicate if they do not agree with the inclusion any of the issues in the priority list. EV energy efficiency and range (issue 1) and EV battery performance and durability (issue 2) were noted to be higher priority items than regulatory incentives, regulatory standards and EV charging (issues 3 – 5). Participants were requested to submit any relevant EV data and/or literature to support the development of Guide conclusions and recommendations.

Concerning issue 1.a., Cabin heating, the group was asked if anyone could confirm that this issue would be covered in the WLTP gtr phase 2; as no confirmation was given, the Secretary agreed to follow-up with the WLTP IWG.

Concerning issue 1.b., Air Conditioning, It was noted by the Mobile Air Conditioning IWG Chair that EVs are not included in their proposal. Andrew Oneski (Canada) clarified that Zeolite is a thermal storage chemical that can be used to improve efficiency. There were no comments concerning issue 1.c. and d. With respect to issue 1.e., road gradient, the Chair asked the group whether EV test cycles and procedures are reflective of regenerative energy captured over the tests. No answer or comments were made.

During discussion of issue 1.f., energy equivalency conversion methods, it was suggested by China to consider adding energy consumption limits. The Chair noted that this was more of a regional issue, and that to set an energy consumption threshold would be outside of the EVE IWG mandate. A representative from Ford and Christoph Albus (Germany) supported the EVE Chair in his view and do not support limit value discussions.

Concerning issue 2), there were no comments or discussion on a) battery durability effect on range and b) potential battery durability effect on kWh/km. For issue 2c) battery performance effect on emissions, there was some discussion about certification of electric-only range by EV manufacturers.

There was limited discussion on regulatory incentives and regulatory standards (issues 3 and 4). There was brief discussion as to whether EV charging (issue 5) should be moved up in the priority list as it is linked to vehicle performance. Christoph Albus (Germany) clarified that charging is not under the WP.29 mandate, but the effects of charging on vehicle performance do need to be considered; the Secretary noted performance-related charging issues would be integrated into issues 1 and 2.

A clarification was made by the Chair in response to a question from OICA about the origin of the issues in the document; the issues were derived from the attributes outlined in the questionnaire submitted to contracting parties for completion (EVE-05-03e).

As a result of this discussion the document EVE-06-04e, EVE IWG Prioritization Discussion Points, was accepted in principle by the EVE IWG.

ACTION 6: The Secretary will follow-up with the WLTP IWG to identify which issues in document EVE-06-04e, EVE IWG Prioritization Discussion Points, will be addressed by the WLTP gtr in phase 2.

ACTION 7: All EVE participants were requested to submit as soon as possible any relevant EV data and/or literature to support the development of the Reference Guide conclusions and recommendations. The Secretary will include this request in the EVE-7 meeting invitation.

ACTION 8: The Secretary will integrate performance-related charging issues into priority issues 1 and 2 for drafting of the reference guide.

c. Review EVE IWG roadmap, Next Steps

Using document EVE-06-03e, Revised EVE Roadmap – May 2013, the Secretary went over the key dates and deadlines. The first draft of the Reference Guide will be reviewed by the EVE IWG at the EVE-7 meeting in Beijing, China (October 17 – 18, 2013), a revised second draft of the Guide will be submitted to the GRPE for first review at the January 2014 session and approval at the GRPE session in June 2014, with the goal of submitting the Guide in August 2014 for WP.29 approval at the November 2014 session. A comment was noted by OICA that the date in item 3.8 needs to be changed from October 2012 to October 2013; the date in item 4.0 also needs to be adjusted to January 2014.

ACTION 9: The Secretary will revise and post the revised version of document EVE-06-03e.

The Chair presented the draft EVE-07 meeting agenda (EVE-06-07e). There were no changes or comments to the proposed agenda.

ACTION 10: The Secretary will finalize and post the agenda ahead of the EVE-07 meeting.

The EVE Secretary led a roundtable discussion of relevant work occurring in other GRPE IWGs:

a. Electric Vehicle Safety (EVS) IWG- update given by Kazuyuki Narusawa (Japan)

The 3rd EVS meeting was held in Tokyo, Japan on April 16 – 18, 2013 and meeting minutes are in document EVS-03-25e. The meeting was successful, with over 50 participants. An important outcome of the meeting was that the proposed gtr outline (EVS-03-02e) was accepted and a draft gtr justification document was presented by OICA. The EVS terms of reference define that a gtr will be produced in three years, but this gtr would likely need to be revised; there is no consensus on whether to produce a more complete gtr in a longer timeframe, or to remain consistent with the timeline in the terms of reference.

b. Worldwide harmonized Light duty Test Procedure (WLTP) IWG- update was given by Per Ohlund (Sweden)

At the time of the EVE-6 meeting, an updated draft of the WLTP gtr was posted as an informal document (GRPE-66-02e). There has been progress made by the EV WLTP subgroup, who concluded open issues for this draft of the gtr at their last meeting in Brussels, May 16 -17, 2013. The WLPT IWG meetings that were scheduled after the EVE-6 IWG meeting were expected to provide more detail as to which open issues remain in finalizing the gtr.

c. Heavy Duty Hybrid (HDH) IWG- update was given by Petter Asman (Sweden)

The HDH group was also having an IWG meeting after the EVE-6 meeting and invited the EVE group to attend. The 13th HDH IWG meeting was held on March 21 – 22, 2013 in Sweden and a drafting group was established, but without a technical secretary. The new Annex 8 to gtr No. 4 will include HILS method based on Japanese regulation and a powertrain method based on US EPA procedure. Validation test program 1 is largely completed, and validation test program 2 started in May 2013, which will include vehicle testing, and will be finalized by September 2013. The next HDH IWG meeting is on October 24 – 25, 2013 in San Francisco, hosted by ICCT.

d. Vehicle Propulsion System Defintions (VPSD) IWG- update was given by Christoph Albus (Germany)

Two documents are currently available for review: VPSD-02-03e contains all comments received from other IWG on proposed draft definitions, while VPSD-02-04e contains comments from the European Commission. The draft WLTP gtr contains some of the agreed upon VPSD definitions, and the EVE IWG is invited to comment on the latest proposed draft definitions. It was noted by the EVE IWG Secretary that the group intends on using VPSD definitions in the EVE Reference Guide as appropriate.

e. Environmental and Propulsion Performance Requirements of L-category vehicles (EPPR)- update was given by Petter Asman (Sweden)

The EPPR IWG initiated work during the January 2013 GRPE session and held a second meeting in Brussels in April 25 – 26, 2013. The focus of work has been on developing a terms of reference and mandate to develop a gtr; updated versions of these documents (GRPE-66-11 and GRPE-66-12) were to be discussed at the 3rd EPPR IWG meeting on June 7th, 2013 in Geneva and presented during the 66th GRPE session. The fourth EPPR session is scheduled for October 8 – 9, 2013 in India.

The EVE Secretary closed this discussion by emphasizing that the EVE group is open to assisting and collaborating with other IWGs on EV issues.

Environmental and Propulsion Performance Requirements for L-category Vehicles | Session 3 | 7 Jun 2013

The draft Minutes of 2nd meeting, (document EPPR-02-11e) were adopted.

EPPR Terms of Reference and rules of Procedure and Request for EPPR mandate have been submitted as informal documents for the 66th session of GRPE (documents GRPE-66-11 and GRPE-66-12).

GRPE adopted the Terms of Reference and agreed to the Request for mandate. The ToR document will be annexed to the report from GRPE and the Request for Mandate should be submitted for approval to WP29 (AC1 and AC3) by the sponsor (EU, represented by the European Commission).

The European Commission presented document EPPR-03-05e:

  • Test type I emission laboratory test equipment can be commonly used for 2-, 3- or 4-wheeled vehicles.
  • The only differentiation for 2-, 3- or 4-wheeled vehicles that needs to be made, is for the determination of the test bench settings: ‘coast down’ provisions and equivalent inertia mass & running resistances.
  • The EC proposes all types of L-category vehicles (2-, 3- or 4-wheels) should follow the same test cycle, the WMTC.

Part of this suggestion is to replace conventional ECE47 test cycle used to type approve L1e (mopeds and light scooters), L2 (three-wheel mopeds) and L6e (light quadricycles) with a new test cycle based on urban, low vehicle speed, part 1 of WMTC test cycle.

The EC explained that R47 is an artificial test cycle: It contains idle, wide open throttle, constant speed phases (20 and 40 km/h) and some accelerations in between, but does not allow sufficient assessment of emission performance in the part-load area. Phase 1 of the WMTC is applied for 50 cm3 motorcycles and should therefore also be applied for 49 cm3 mopeds, allowing a more realistic emission verification of low displacement vehicles operated simulating dynamic conditions occurring in modern urban traffic.

Following the EC’s explanation for Type I, IMMA expressed its concern that the group is losing the agreed emphasis for OBD and EVAP.

The chair disagreed and confirmed that OBD and EVAP remain top priorities as requested by Japan.

The chair added it was his understanding from previous working group meeting that OBD and EVAP would be dealt with as first together with Type I.

Hungary asked for a justification to change the current test cycle for mopeds.

India explained that WMTC was designed for L3 vehicles and that driving data was collected for the creation of it. India considered EC’s synthesis a paper exercise. For expansion to other categories, India suggested collecting data or at least doing a validation.

NL suggested that EC should not only address the problem of mopeds not able to reach the maximum speed of WMTC part 1. NL doubted that mopeds with 1 or 2 horsepower would be able to follow the trace and suggested this needs to be looked at, stating also there would be no time to do this.

D-Heinz Steven explained that the specific dynamic behavior of vehicles cannot be ignored. If WMTC part one would need to be applied to mopeds, the whole cycle would need to be rescaled.

The EC saw no need to collect data, as lots of data was collected for WMTC. The EC stated that the border at at 50 cc is arbitrary and is not technically justified. 50cc motorcycles are already in the scope but are only limited to a certain maximum speed.. The EC said a test cycle is a compromise between regions and the same compromise for mopeds should be made.

The European Commission presented earlier document EPPR-03-05e:

  • For regulatory structure of the EPPR-output under the 1998 Agreement, the EC proposed:
    • Expand scope of GTR2:
      1. Include engine displacement < 50 cm3

      2. Add durability (type V) apart from cold start pollutant emissions (type I), idle (II) and CO2 (VII). The EC noted India’s proposal to create a new GTR for durability, for reason of test fuel. But EC suggested to find a creative solution for the test fuel issue.

    • New GTR for crankcase and evaporative emissions (types III and IV)

    • New GTR for test type VIII, to be discussed if functional OBD can be included. In EU, OBD includes functional safety.

    • New GTR for propulsion performance (max vehicle design speed, max torque and power)

  • For regulatory structure of the EPPR-output under the 1958 Agreement:
    • The EC sees 2 options:
      1. Replicate structure of R83 & R101 (include all environmental test types in one new UN Regulation and the propulsion performance requirements into another new one); or

      2. Mimic structure as proposed for 1998 Agreement in new “shadow” Regulations.
        EC is neutral, and is open to any of the two options above.

    • The EC proposed to consider upgrading R40 and R47 with measurement equipment requirements (NOT the test cycles) from GTR No 2.
      The EC suggests to discuss if categories L6 and L7 (light 4-wheel vehicles) can be included in the scope of new UN Regulations (58 Agreement only). As a principle, EC suggests to consider applying provisions for 3-wheel vehicles also to 4- wheelers.

TRL showed document EPPR-03-07.

The chair summarized the positions:

  • First priority: OBD, EVAP and Type I
  • Main priority: L3, also acknowledge to have L1 in the scope

IMMA supported a broad scope for EPPR, but expressed a concern regarding feasibility to discuss L3 and L1 at the same time, considering the number of subjects. IMMA proposed to work sequentially, dealing first with L3 because this is the most important and biggest class of vehicles looking at the worldwide market. IMMA explained that only EU and China have mopeds (L1) and moped share in China is 11%, but a strong decline is observed in China as ICE-mopeds are replaced by electric vehicles.

EC said there is an artificial threshold between L3 and L1, and added that there is no difference between them that justifies a different assessment methodology of the environmental and propulsion performance of a 49 cm3 moped compared to a 50 cm3 motorcycle.

The chair proposed to combine discussions for L3 and L1 as much as possible and to work sequential on a case by case basis if there is a clear difference, focusing in that case on L3 first.

The group accepted the proposal that chair and the secretary will draft a more detailed roadmap.

The chair explained his intention to have a phone/web conference in the 2nd of 3rd week of September. More
details to follow.

EPPR-04 will take place in India on 8-9 October. An invitation has been uploaded, see doc. EPPR-04-01e.

EPPR-05 is expected to take place 8 Jan 2014, PM in Geneva, in conjunction with the GRPE-68.

The chair repeated his requested for stakeholders to step forward for hosting future meetings.

Terms of Reference was adopted and Request for mandate document were agreed by GRPE 66th session and will
go to WP29.

Following structure and deliverables were agreed:

  • Structure under the ’98 agreement:

    Type I (Tail pipe), Type II (Idle) and Type VII (CO2)amendment to GTR2
    EVAP and crankcase (Type IV and III)new GTR
    OBD (Type VIII)new GTR
    Durability (Type V)Open issue:
    EC proposed to put under GTR2.
    India preferred to create a separate GTR due to different market fuels in the different world regions
    Propulsion/Performance testnew GTR
    Note: 2-, 3-wheel in the same gtr’s, as separate annexes if deemed necessary, unless found not feasible.
  • Two- and three-wheel vehicles to be put under common GTR’s, as separate annexes, unless found not
    appropriate
  • Quadricycles to be discussed under the ‘58 agreement first.

EVAP, OBD and Type I will be given 1st priority. The chair and secretary will draft a proposal for a complete roadmap to be discussed at a phone/web conference in September.

Technical discussions on prioritized subjects should start in the meeting in October in India.

None.

Japan presented document EPPR-03-04e:

  • Domestic EVAP and OBD draft regulations for L3 vehicles are to be finalized by end of 2013. As such, Japan suggests to put priority on EVAP and OBD in the EPPR working group.
  • Japan suggested having a detailed discussion in the next meeting in India. Japan outlined a draft EVAP test flow, indicating identified points for discussion.
  • For OBD, Japan will report at next meeting.

The chairman confirmed EVAP and OBD are highest priority for the group.

India presented their revised proposal, document EPPR-03-02e:

  • India prefers to give priority for GTR’s first and subsequent transposition to ECE for categories covered both in SR 1 and RE3.
  • India suggested discussing quadricycles first under the ’58 agreement, as these vehicles are not included in the categorization of SR1.
  • India proposed:
    • To group tailpipe emissions: Cold start pollutant emissions (type I), Idle (II) & CO2 (VII), and make an amendment to GTR2.
    • To group EVAP and crankcase emissions in a new GTR
    • To create a separate, new GTR for OBD
    • To create a separate, new GTR for durability
    • To create a separate, new GTR for performance related tests
  • India proposed to give priority to EVAP, OBD and tailpipe emissions.
  • India suggested to put 2-wheel (L1, L3 & L4-categories) and 3-wheel vehicles (L2 & L5-categories) under a common GTR, but separated in different annexes of the GTR. India added L3 can be given priority.

TRL presented doc. EPPR-03-06e suggested following priorities:

  • First:
    • Test type I: Emissions after cold start
    • Test type IV: Evaporative emissions
    • Test type VIII: OBD

  • Second
    • Test type V: Durability of pollution control devices
    • Test type III: Crankcase emissions
  • Third
    • Test type VII: Energy efficiency, i.e. CO2 emissions, fuel/energy consumption, electric range
    • Test type II: Idle emissions

  • Fourth
    • Propulsion performance requirements

  • Fifth
    • Classification of vehicles and definitions

TRL recommended also the chair and secretary to maintain a definitions list and made reference to a revised detailed roadmap ( EPPR-03-07e.xlsx) they had developed and were proposing to the group based on the discussions in the 2nd meeting.

With regards to structure of regulations under the ’98 agreement, TRL said durability (Type V) and OBD (Type VIII) could either be grouped in GTR2, or put into separate new GTRs.

For propulsive performance TRL remained to have the idea that R68 and R85 could be expanded.

Following the proposal by India to have 2- and 3-wheel vehicles as separate annexes in a common GTR, the chairman asked if the group could agree to amend GTR2 in order to include 3-wheel vehicles.

IMMA raised a study reservation, and said they need to check from a technical point of view if current WMTC is suitable for 3-wheelers.

The chairman suggested to follow a similar approach as used in the Heavy Duty Hybrid working group (under GRPE): Describe in the EPPR work plan/roadmap that the intention is to have 2- and 3-wheel vehicles as separate annexes in a common GTR, but if ‘on the road’ any problem is discovered with this approach, we remain having the option to split 2- and 3-wheel vehicles in separate GTR’s.

Following a discussion, the chairman confirmed the positions as basis for the structure:

  • Japan and India prefer priority is given on specifications 2-wheelers, especially for L3 category. They can accept to include L1 and to have 2 and 3-wheeler specifications in a same GTR.
  • EC can accept to focus on L3, but prefers also to have L1 (lower powered vehicles) included.

The chairman summarized the position of the group for structure under the ’98 agreement:

Type I, Type II and CO2 (Type VII)amendment GTR2
EVAP and crankcase (Type IV and III)new GTR
OBD (Type VIII)new GTR
Durability (Type V)Open issue:
EC proposed to put under GTR2.
India preferred to create a separate GTR due to different market fuels in the different world regions
Propulsion/Performance testnew GTR
Note: 2-, 3-wheel in the same gtr’s, as separate annexes if deemed necessary, unless found not feasible.

The proposal by India to discuss quadricycles under ‘58 agreement first was accepted by the group.

Working Party on Pollution and Energy | Session 68 | 7-10 Jan 2014

1. The Working Party on Pollution and Energy (GRPE) held its sixty-eighth session from 7 to 10 January 2014, with Mr. Christoph Albus (Germany) as Chair and Mr. Shrikant Marathe (India) as vice-Chair. Experts from the following countries participated in the work following Rule 1(a) of the Rules of Procedure of the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29) (TRANS/WP.29/690, as amended): Austria; Belgium; Canada; China; France; Germany; Hungary; India; Italy; Japan; Netherlands; Norway; Poland; Republic of Korea (Korea); Russian Federation; South Africa; Spain; Sweden; Switzerland; United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (UK); United States of America (USA). Experts from the European Commission (EC) also participated.

Experts from the following non-governmental organizations took part in the session: Association for Emissions Control by Catalyst (AECC); Association of European Manufacturers of Internal Combustion Engines (EUROMOT); European Association of Automobile Suppliers (CLEPA/MEMA/JAPIA); European Garage Equipment Association (EGEA); European Liquefied Petroleum Gas Association (AEGPL); European Tyre and Rim Technical Organization (ETRTO); International Motorcycle Manufacturers Association (IMMA); and International Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers (OICA); Truck and Engine Manufacturers Association (EMA). Upon the special invitation of the Chair, the experts from the following entities also attended: Environmental Industries Commission (EIC); European Tyre & Rubber Manufacturers Association (ETRMA); Technical Committee of Petroleum Additive Manufacturers in Europe (CEFIC-ATC); FEV Group.

2. Having welcomed the participants in conjunction with the GRPE Chair and Vice-Chair, the GRPE secretary announced his forthcoming change of duties. The secretary of WP.29 explained the subsequent organizational changes, introducing to GRPE the secretary appointed on a temporary basis for the June 2014 session and informing GRPE that the recruitment process for a new GRPE secretary has started. GRPE acknowledged the excellent support given by the secretary, Mr. Pierpaolo Cazzola during his tenure and wished him all the best in his new assignment.

3. GRPE adopted the agenda (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/1, Adds.1 and 2), as consolidated in GRPE-68-02. GRPE also noted GRPE-68-01-Rev.2, on the organization of GRPE informal working group meetings.

4. The informal documents distributed during the GRPE session are listed in Annex I [of the session report]. Annex II contains a list of the informal meetings held in conjunction with the GRPE session. Annex III lists GRPE informal working groups, task forces and subgroups, giving details on their Chairs, secretaries, and the end of their mandates.

5. The secretariat introduced GRPE-68-05, announcing that the next ordinary GRPE session would take place on 2-6 June 2014 and recalling that the deadline for the submission of official working documents is 7 March 2014. The Chairs and secretaries of informal working groups were invited to approach the secretariat to define the calendar of meetings of informal working groups for the June 2014 GRPE session.

6. Introducing GRPE-68-06, the secretariat informed GRPE about items discussed in the 160th and 161st sessions of the World Forum (held in June 2013 and November 2013) (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1104 and Add.1, ECE/TRANS/WP.29/1106).

7. The reports of the sixty-fifth and sixty-sixth GRPE sessions were approved by WP.29. All documents transmitted by GRPE, including in particular the two new UN Regulations on Retrofit Emission Control (REC) and on the recyclability of motor vehicles, were adopted by the World Forum.

8. AC.3 agreed with the proposal by the EC and Japan to start working on the development of the first amendment to the WLTP UN GTR (as defined in ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2014/27, filed for consideration and possible adoption by WP.29 in March 2014, jointly with ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2014/28, the final report on this activity). The formal endorsement of ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2014/30, containing detailed information on the organization of the WLTP informal working group and a proposal for the extension of its mandate until the November 2016 is scheduled for the March 2014 session of WP.29.

9. AC.3 endorsed ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/127, a proposal by the EC to develop amendments to UN GTR No. 2, eventually contemplating the possibility to develop new UN GTRs and UN Regulations. The results and the final report on this activity are expected in 2016.

10. Following the information on the development of the activities of the EVE informal working group, WP.29 agreed with the proposed schedule of the circulation of the EVE regulatory reference guide (draft in the current GRPE session, official document for the June 2014 session of GRPE, and consideration by WP.29 in November 2014). In order to define how to address future regulatory aspects that have implications for both the WLTP and EVE informal working groups, the World Forum also recommended setting up a coordination meeting between the Chairs and secretaries of the two informal working groups.

11. WP.29 agreed to extend the VPSD informal working group mandate to June 2014.

12. The World Forum endorsed WP.29-160-19-Rev.1 as contribution of the Transport Division to the UNECE position on the issue of diesel exhaust emissions. Following the submission of informal documents by the Russian Federation, WP.29 also agreed with the GRPE decision to assign the follow-up of the issues concerning the emissions of particles from tyre and brake wear to the PMP informal working group.

13. Following the presentation by the Republic of Korea of a proposal to consider regulatory actions on VIAQ and the subsequent discussion, WP.29 agreed that it is necessary to collect more information on the subject and analyse it further before deciding upon the eventual development a UN GTR.

14. The GRPE Chair recalled that the WLTP UN GTR (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2014/27) is scheduled to be considered by WP.29 in March 2014, jointly with the technical report on this activity (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2014/28). He noted that the technical report is referencing the detailed reports on the activities of the WLTP subgroups on the Development of the Harmonized Cycle (DHC) and the Development of the Test Procedure (DTP) (GRPE-68-03 and GRPE-68-04). GRPE endorsed GRPE-68-03 and GRPE-68-04.

15. Speaking on behalf of the co-sponsors, the EC and Japan, the expert from the EC presented ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2014/30, containing a proposal to extend the mandate of the WLTP informal working group until November 2016 to develop a first amendment to the WLTP UN GTR. He outlined an indicative road map defining the development of these activities and explained that it foresees a longer period of work with respect to WP.29-161-14 and GRPE-67-06, respectively circulated at the November sessions of WP.29 and GRPE. GRPE endorsed ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2014/30.

16. The Chair of the WLTP introduced the status report of the group (GRPE-68-15). He explained that the Chair and the Drafting Coordinator are experts from the European Union, the Vice-Chair and a Technical Secretary are experts from Japan, and a second Technical Secretary representing OICA. He explained that the group is currently structured as a subgroup on E-Lab and task forces addressing emerging open issues. Having outlined parallel activities being carried out in the EU, he invited Contracting Parties to provide feedback on these subjects by mid-February 2014, in order to update the list of issues that need to be addressed by the WLTP group. He concluded informing GRPE about the next meetings of the group and requested the secretariat to reserve a room for a meeting to be held during the June 2014 GRPE session.

17. The Chair of the informal group on MACTP reported that the MACTP group did not meet before the GRPE session proper, explaining that the meeting originally planned did not take place because of delays in the development of this work. GRPE acknowledged the status of these activities.

18. The expert from the EC introduced ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/2 and a corrigendum contained in GRPE-68-08, outlining a proposal to amend UN Regulation No. 83 in order to align its requirements with those of the European Union Regulation (EC) Nos. 715/2007, 692/2008, 566/2011, 459/2012 and 630/2012.

19. The expert from Germany stressed the need to combine safety-related provisions on H2NG flex fuel vehicles with the provisions included in the proposal. The expert from France supported this statement. She underlined that, while Europe has a whole vehicle type approval procedure in place and capable to ensure that the safety issues are also taken into consideration, this is not the case in Contracting Parties that are not subject to the European homologation procedure.

20. The expert from OICA introduced GRPE-68-07-Rev.1, proposing to modify ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/2 in order to avoid misinterpretations in the practical implementation of the UN Regulation. GRPE-68-07-Rev.1 contains modifications regarding the inclusion of: i) pure electric vehicles and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles in the table on the application of test requirements for type approval and extensions; ii) requirements of UN Regulation No. 85 in UN Regulation No. 83; iii) aspects related with real driving conditions (currently being discussed in the EU); iv) a limit of validity of type-approvals clause and v) the concept of H2NG flex fuel vehicles. It also addresses the requirements for daytime running lamps and for vehicles equipped with compression-ignition engines. The expert from OICA underlined that GRPE-68-07-Rev.1 addresses the concerns on H2NG flex fuel vehicles raised by the experts from Germany and France.

21. The expert from Japan supported GRPE-68-07-Rev.1. The expert from the EC agreed to remove the references to the hydrogen and natural gas (H2NG) fuel from ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/2. The expert from Italy agreed with this solution, but he also underlined the need to consider H2NG in future developments of UN Regulation No. 83 and other regulatory texts. Following a comment by the expert from the United Kingdom, a reference to vehicles required to be equipped with daytime running lamps, originally included in the OICA proposal (amending section 3.2.7. of Annex 4a), was removed from GRPE-68-07-Rev.1.

22. GRPE adopted ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/2, as amended by GRPE-68-08 and GRPE-68-07-Rev.1 (without the amendment of section 3.2.7. of Annex 4a), requesting the secretariat to combine these modifications and submit the resulting text to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their June 2014 sessions as the 07 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 83.

23. The expert from OICA introduced ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/9, updating the On-Board Diagnostics (OBD) requirements in ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/2 (07 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 83). He also explained that ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/8 contains similar changes for the 06 series of amendments. The expert from CLEPA mentioned that the consequences of these proposals are currently being scrutinized. The expert from the EC expressed the need to analyse the proposals in further detail, also stating that the position of all stakeholders affected by these modifications needs to be taken into account. The expert from Germany also expressed concerns on the content of the proposals. The expert from OICA sought the GRPE advice for their future consideration. GRPE endorsed the invitation by the expert from the EC to consider ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/8 and ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/9 in an expert meeting with interested stakeholders with the aim to find a compromise. GRPE also requested the expert from the EC to provide information on the development of this discussion in the June 2014 session of GRPE.

24. The expert from OICA introduced ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/3, a proposal to amend the 06 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 83 in order to align the emission requirements for “social needs” vehicles (currently based on M vehicles) with those enforced in the EU (also contemplating N1, class 3 limits), also clarifying the need to amend the footnote to the table with emission limits. Introducing ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/7, he also outlined a proposal for complementary modifications to the 06 series of amendments of UN Regulation No. 83 to clarify its compatibility with the scope of UN Regulation No. 49.

25. GRPE adopted ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/3, amended as follows:

Page 2, Table 1, the text of note 2, amend “special social needs” to read “specific social needs”.

GRPE also adopted ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/7, not amended. GRPE requested the secretariat to combine the modifications adopted to a single proposal and to submit the resulting text to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their June 2014 session as Supplement 4 to the 06 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 83. Following the consideration by expert from the Netherlands on the need to exclude vehicles with specific social needs from the 07 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 83, GRPE invited the EC, the Netherlands and OICA to consider the submission of a proposal for an amendment addressing this aspect in the June 2014 session of GRPE.

26. The expert from the EC introduced ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/5, a proposal to align the requirements of UN Regulation No. 101 with the latest changes in the regulatory framework of the European Union in relation to the specifications of new reference fuels E10 and B7, explaining that this is related with the provisions of ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/2.

27. GRPE adopted ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/5, not amended, and requested the secretariat to submit it to WP.29 and AC.1 for consideration at their June 2014 sessions as Supplement 4 to the 01 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 101.

28. The expert from Germany introduced GRPE-68-18, illustrating recent findings on the emission performance of approved replacement pollution control devices. He showed that the performance of the devices currently available on the market can vary to a high extent and sought guidance from GRPE on the preparation of a proposal to amend UN Regulation No. 103.

29. The experts from the EC, France, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland welcomed the contribution from Germany, agreeing that this subject requires further investigation. The experts from France and Spain also underlined some difficulties in the applications of UN Regulation No. 103. GRPE agreed with the initiative announced by the expert from Germany to submit a proposal for the setup of an informal working group tackling this issue in the June 2014 GRPE session.

30. The Chair and the secretary of the HDH group introduced GRPE-68-14 on the HDH work progress. The HDH Chair summarized the fifteenth and sixteenth group meetings. Having explained the status of validation test programmes, he announced that the validation expected to be completed by the end of March 2014. Following an overview of the remaining open issues, having confirmed that the official submission of the text amending UN GTR No. 4 is expected for June 2014 session of GRPE and having expressed his confidence about the possibility to meet this deadline, he announced that there is a risk of not being able to do so if the validation fails, or if the open issues not solved to the satisfaction of the group. In this case, an extension of the HDH informal working group mandate will be requested at the June 2014 GRPE session.

31. [The HDH Chair] focused on the draft amendment to UN GTR No. 4 (GRPE-68-12) by providing details on the definitions, the concept of hybrid powertrain family, the approach considered, the content of Annex 8 (hardware in the loop simulation method) and 9 (powertrains method), as well as amendments aligning UN GTR No. 4 with UN GTR No. 11. The endorsement of GRPE was needed on this last point, since this is beyond the original HDH mandate.

32. [The HDH Chair] announced that, contrary to what was announced in earlier GRPE sessions, the technical report could not be finalized and submitted at the current GRPE session because the work programme would not be completed by March 2014. He suggested that it will be submitted as informal document to the next GRPE session and concluded by asking the secretariat to reserve a room for half a day for the HDH meeting to be held in conjunction with the June 2014 GRPE session.

34. GRPE endorsed the proposal of the HDH Chair to widen the mandate of the group to include amendments aligning UN GTR No. 4 with UN GTR No. 11. GRPE requested the sponsor (EU) to submit an informal document illustrating the choice to widen the mandate to the March 2014 session of WP.29 and AC.3, amending document ECE/TRANS/WP.29/AC.3/29.

33. The expert from OICA emphasized the importance to clarify before the end of January 2014 whether the system work or the engine work should be considered for the development of the regulatory text. GRPE endorsed the proposal by the expert from Sweden to set up a meeting of interested stakeholders in the EC framework to solve this issue.

35. The Chair of the REC group illustrated ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/4, as updated by GRPE-68-17-Rev.2, containing a proposal for the 01 series of amendments to the UN Regulation on REC. This includes a revision in the definitions of the REC devices, stricter limit values (reduction levels) for REC systems, transitional provisions for the type approval of REC systems that meet the requirements of the REC Regulation in its original form, as well as a revision of the test sequence for particulate reduction and the equivalence matrix for the UN Regulation No. 49 standard series.

36. GRPE adopted ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/4, as amended in the informal document GRPE-68-17-Rev.2, and requested the secretariat to submit the resulting proposal to WP.29 and AC.1, for consideration at their June 2014 sessions as the 01 series of amendments to the UN Regulation on REC.

37. The expert from OICA introduced ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/6, a proposal aiming to align the scope of the 05 series of amendments to UN Regulation No. 49 with that of the 06 series.

38. GRPE adopted ECE/TRANS/WP.29/GRPE/2014/6, not amended, and requested the secretariat to submit it to WP.29 and AC.1, for consideration at their June 2014 sessions as Supplement 7 to the 05 series of amendments to Regulation No. 49.

40. GRPE did not receive any new proposal to amend UN Regulations No. 85 and 115.

39. GRPE did not receive any new proposal to amend UN GTRs Nos. 4, 5 and 10.

71. There were no proposals to discuss other business.

70. Speaking on behalf of GRPE, the Chair GRPE paid a tribute to Mr. Aldo Bassi and Mr. Stanislaw Radzimirski, who passed away in 2013, acknowledging their considerable contributions to the activities of the group.

69. GRPE agreed that the introduction of the CCAC activities, suggested following the discussion of the agenda item on fuel quality, shall be considered under this agenda item in the next GRPE session.

67. Providing an update on the European policy concerning CO2 emissions from heavy-duty vehicles, the expert from the EC provided information of the development of a methodology for the assessment of the fuel-, energy consumption and CO2 emissions of Heavy Duty Vehicles (HDVs). Its core component is the VECTO tool, currently existing as a prototype. The tool allows for the simulation of HDV CO2 emissions using a number of technical component specific and vehicle specific parameters (engine, other drive train components, superstructure, and auxiliaries) over several standard test cycles, which are specific for the use of the vehicle (i.e. mission profile specific cycles such as city delivery cycle, long haul delivery cycle and others). The new simulation tool will be made available to the public as an element for their purchase decision to allow operators to simulate the fuel consumption and CO2 emission performance of different HDVs for their individual purpose. Further regulatory actions will be considered at a later stage, notably the introduction of CO2 emission limits (as for light vehicles) or possibly other options such as the possible inclusion of road transport emissions in the EU Emission Trading System. The development of UN Regulations or UN GTRs addressing CO2 emissions from HDV is not foreseen at the moment.

68. The expert from OICA underlined the difficulty to link the energy consumption and CO2 emission performances, the usage profiles of vehicles and type approval requirements. The expert from the EC clarified that legislative instruments to associate the use of the VECTO tool for the emissions with type approval process is currently on-going. A proof of concept study was performed by the EC in collaboration with Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) in order to demonstrate the plausibility of this certification approach, the effectiveness of the experimental procedures introduced and the accuracy of the model. Results were very promising with simulated CO2 being within ±3.5% of measured values over several different operating conditions. Nevertheless, should the VECTO’s specific mission profile cycles be considered inappropriate for type approval certification, he reported that it is also possible to test the HDV on the road, using a pre-determined test cycle. A proposal is expected over the course of 2014.

66. GRPE did not receive any new proposal to consider amendments to UN Rule No. 1.

65. Having recalled the WP.29 decision to seek more information on VIAQ before taking decisions upon the development of a UN GTR on the subject (as reported under agenda item 2), the GRPE Chair announced that the VIAQ expert from Korea wished to share a presentation on the subject (GRPE-68-11). Unfortunately, he could not attend this session. GRPE agreed to postpone the introduction of GRPE-68-11 to its next session, in June 2014, maintaining this item on the agenda.

64. As mentioned by the secretariat under agenda item 2, the new UN Regulations on the recyclability of motor vehicles (ECE/TRANS/WP.29/2013/125) was adopted by the World Forum in its November 2013 session. GRPE agreed to remove this item from the agenda of its next session, including the discussion of proposals for the amendment to this new UN Regulation under the agenda item dealing with UN Regulations Nos. 85 and 115.

63. The GRPE Chair and the IWVTA Ambassador reported on the IWVTA development process, explaining that the objective to extend the mutual recognition of vehicle systems and components to whole vehicles could not be achieved in a single step. UN Regulation No. 0 will therefore allow, in a first step, a partial IWVTA, limited to M1 category of vehicles and requiring completion by national or regional approvals. The possibility of a complete whole vehicle approval is foreseen for a later stage. The structure of UN Regulation No. 0 includes two tentative lists with UN Regulations that would need to be complied with for obtaining a Whole Vehicle Type Approval: thirty-nine UN Regulations could already be included in the first step of the partial IWVTA (list A), while fourteen UN Regulations (list B) need amendment before their inclusion into list A. The GRPE Chair clarified that no action is needed from GRPE at the moment. Future action needs for GRPE shall be monitored and reported to GRPE by the GRPE Chair and IWVTA Ambassador.

41. The expert from EUROMOT introduced GRPE-68-09, containing a proposal to amend UN Regulation No. 96. This aims to allow the engine manufacturers to obtain approvals, even in Contracting Parties that apply more recent series of amendments, for engines that need to be marketed in Contracting Parties applying previous series of amendments. He clarified that this is in line with the provisions of UN Regulation No. 49.

42. The experts from Italy and the United Kingdom supported the proposal.

43. GRPE requested the secretariat to distribute GRPE-68-09 as an official document for consideration at the GRPE session of June 2014.

44. There were no proposals to amend UN Global Technical Regulation No. 11.

45. The Chair of the PMP provided an overview of the latest activities of the informal working group, focusing primarily on emissions of sub 23 nm particles and particles from tyre and brake wear. He focused first on sub 23 nm particles (GRPE-68-21), reporting that the PMP informal working group does not see an urgent need to revise the current measurement cut-off size of 23 nm. He mentioned that the literature review on the emission of particles from tyre and brake wear (GRPE-68-20) has been completed. He cautioned about the numerous measurement techniques, the important differences between light and heavy duty vehicles, the importance of driving conditions and the lack of a clear definition of non-exhaust emissions. Overall, he reported that exhaust and non-exhaust sources are estimated to contribute almost equally to total traffic-related PM10 emissions. The relative contribution of non-exhaust sources is expected to increase in the coming years due to the tendency of decreasing exhaust emissions. He provided information on the mass and number size distributions, the chemical characterization of particles from tyre and brake wear, providing estimations of the emission factors applicable to them. He underlined that brake particles are always linked to the vehicles, while particles from tyre wear result from the interaction of the vehicle and the road. Having mentioned current research activities being carried out by the industry, he concluded that knowledge at present is not sufficient in these areas and several open questions remain. He warned that, should the PMP meeting keep working on tyre and brake wear, it will be necessary to revise the mandate of the informal working group, since this is currently limited to the literature work presented at this GRPE session.

46. Having recalled the submission of GRPE-65-20, WP.29-160-39 and WP.29-161-22 on tyre and brake wear and vehicle indoor air quality, the expert from the Russian Federation introduced GRPE-68-10. He argued that the estimates about tyre and brake wear presented in it are significantly higher than the limits set by the Euro 6 pollutant emission regulations. He underlined that the importance of tyre and brake wear estimated in it is significantly higher than earlier estimates on the subject. He provided insights on the impact of the estimations of the contents of particulate matter within vehicles and in the outdoor air in urban driving conditions, and concluded that increased attention to the equipment of vehicles with instruments improving the indoor air quality needs to be taken into consideration.

47. GRPE acknowledged the information provided by the PMP informal working group and the Russian Federation and requested the PMP group to propose in the June 2014 session of GRPE a possible roadmap on how to proceed further with the issue of particles from tyre and brake wear.

48. The Chair of the informal working group on GFV reported on the work progress made by the group (GRPE-68-23), mentioning the recent meetings that led to the adoption of GFV-related texts in 2013 by WP.29. He recalled the decision to develop a new UN Regulation for heavy duty dual fuel retrofit, providing information on the recent development of this task and reporting that an informal document on the subject is expected for the June 2014 GRPE session. Official consideration by GRPE is currently scheduled for January 2015, and WP.29 consideration for June 2015. A task force for the retrofit of heavy duty dual fuel has already been established. Issues recently discussed include the scope of the text, the concept of families, aspects related with the need for the type approval of retrofitted dual fuel engines. The question of using the retrofit notations with or without the presence of substantial modification to the emission strategies of heavy duty engines has been discussed in detail. An agreement to maintain the retrofit wording also for modifications with substantial effects on emission strategies has been reached with OICA. Future activities will focus on the consideration of fundamental principles, the liability of original equipment manufacturers after the engine conversion, and the research of solutions to address other open issues. The GFV Chair concluded by requesting the secretariat to reserve a room for a brief meeting during the June 2014 GRPE session.

49. GRPE acknowledged the progress made by the group.

50. Introducing GRPE-68-24, the Chair of the EPPR informal working group informed GRPE about recent meetings. He listed the topics that need to be addressed by the informal working group, clarifying that the initial focus of the work on two wheelers and that the evaporative emissions test and on-board diagnostics environmental verification tests are the current priorities. He reported that a draft text addressing evaporative emissions is expected to be ready in April 2014. On OBD, he reported that, even if a draft text is expected by April 2014, the complexity of this subject may lead to the postponement of some of the aspects to a later stage. He concluded by outlining the schedule of future meetings and requested the secretariat to reserve a room for a brief meeting during the June 2014 GRPE session.

51. The expert from IMMA expressed his support for the choices made on the prioritization of the group. The expert from Italy also expressed his appreciation for the choice to focus initially on two wheelers.

52. GRPE acknowledged the progress of the group.

53. GRPE did not receive any new proposal to amend UN Regulations Nos. 40 and 47.

54. GRPE did not receive any new proposal to amend UN GTR No. 2.

55. The secretary of the informal group on EVE introduced GRPE-68-22, reporting on recent meetings and providing information on the draft regulatory reference guide (GRPE-68-13). He focused on the recommendations that are contained in the guide, explaining that they concern the vehicle range and energy consumption testing, the method of calculation for energy consumption and CO2 emissions (including the impact of upstream losses), battery performance and durability, battery recycling. He acknowledged that the recommendation on the method estimating upstream energy use and CO2 emissions is currently the most controversial subject. Reporting on the meeting between EVE and WLTP leadership groups, he mentioned that the expert from the EC offered to suggest solution aiming to ensure that the EVE and the WLTP activities will not lead to the duplication of work. He concluded by summarizing the schedule of forthcoming meetings and requested the secretariat to reserve a room for a meeting during the June 2014 GRPE session.

56. The Chair of GRPE suggested some alternatives concerning the development of the regulatory work with an impact for electric vehicles: i) maintaining the existing structure, with two informal working groups: ii) combine the WLTP and EVE groups; or iii) restructure the reporting hierarchy of the groups, with the EVE reporting to WLTP for issues related with the WLTP UN GTR and to GRPE directly for all other issues. He considered also that future regulatory instruments may need to be developed under the current WLTP regulatory framework or as part of other UN Regulations and UN GTRs.

57. Having expressed concerns about the controversies regarding the method of stating upstream energy use and CO2 emissions, the Chair of GRPE invited Contracting Parties to seek an agreement on this topic. He recalled that, should these controversies remain unsolved at the EVE and GRPE levels, they will need to be considered by WP.29 and AC.3.

58. The secretary of the VPSD informal working group introduced GRPE-68-19, on the work progress, and informed GRPE about current open issues and discussion items. She clarified that the informal working group agreed on the development schedule for the framework system of definitions of vehicles, powertrains, energy converters and energy storage systems to be introduced as annexes to R.E.3 and S.R.1. A draft is expected to be circulated in the June 2014 session of GRPE. An official document shall be submitted in January 2015, and WP.29 consideration is foreseen for June 2015.

59. GRPE acknowledged the progress made by the group and agreed to submit to WP.29 the request for an extension of its mandate to June 2015

60. On behalf of AECC, CLEPA, EUROMOT and OICA, the expert from OICA introduced GRPE-68-16-Rev.1, containing recommendations, for inclusion in the Consolidated Resolution on the Construction of Vehicles (R.E.3) and Special Resolution No. 1 concerning the common definitions of vehicle categories, masses and dimensions (S.R.1) on the minimum quality of gasoline and diesel fuels that are expected to be introduced contextually with increasingly stringent limits of motor vehicle and non-road mobile machinery pollutant emissions. He recalled that the recommendations includes several annexes on the emission levels allowed by different series of amendments to UN Regulations, the correspondence with European emission standards, and the explanation of the importance of the parameters introduced in the recommendations with respect to pollutant emission reduction strategies. He concluded by expressing the willingness of AECC, CLEPA, EUROMOT and OICA to discuss the recommendation with other stakeholders.

61. The expert from Italy expressed his support for this proposal and requested to maintain the subject on the GRPE agenda. The expert from the USA expressed his support for the consideration of vehicles and fuels as a system when looking at strategies for the reduction of pollutant emissions. Both the experts from Italy and the USA expressed the need to involve other stakeholders in the discussion.

62. GRPE invited all stakeholders to contribute to assure progress on this topic. The expert from OICA welcomed this decision. GRPE also welcomed the proposal of the expert from Sweden to present the activities of the Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC), a global effort to treat short-lived climate pollutants such as black carbon, methane and many hydrofluorocarbons to protect human health and the environment in the next GRPE session.